What was the last movie you watched?

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
"Lights in the Dusk"


I really like this film. It’s the usual Aki Kaurismäki droll humor with minimalist storytelling, great visuals, and a character’s passive acceptance of being assigned a miserable role in life. Definitely not a popcorn movie, but I’m a Kaurismäki fan.

Also watched the BBC documentary "When Nirvana Came to Britain"

 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
Rewatching some old stuff with my mum.

My Best Friends' Wedding. (Julia Roberts, Diaz)
The Holiday (Kate Winslet, Cameron Diaz, Jude Law).
Sully (Tom Hanks)
The Walk (great movie about a tight-rope walker who spent about 45 minutes on the tightrope between the two towers/WTC)
Our Souls At Night (Redford, Jane Fonda)
 
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Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
I have time to watch just 1 of these 3 movies, which one is the best ??



 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
Meet The Parents (2000).
Ugh :eek:

They actually made two sequels to this nonsense. Poor Deniro. Must have been going through a rough time to take up such movies.
 

ChaelAZ

G.O.A.T.
Meet The Parents (2000).
Ugh :eek:

They actually made two sequels to this nonsense. Poor Deniro. Must have been going through a rough time to take up such movies.

Cat nipples weren't the only things getting milk with those sequels.
 
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Sentinel

Bionic Poster
Haha its what we call ‘time pass’ movie.

Watched The Courier on Prime
Mum wanted to re-watch The Mountain Between Us. It was not on Netflix so I procured it. But midway my new WD My Passport drive died out.
So now i am trying to get through to WD support to have it replaced.:(
 

Azure

G.O.A.T.
Mum wanted to re-watch The Mountain Between Us. It was not on Netflix so I procured it. But midway my new WD My Passport drive died out.
So now i am trying to get through to WD support to have it replaced.:(
I have no idea what you are saying - is this a contraption to run your movies on?
 

NonP

Hall of Fame
Since I missed the chance to highlight TCM's propitious Summer Under the Stars pick (hint: think Satoshi Kon's Millennium Actress) from a month ago I'll review the choice titles starring the beloved thespian in a later post. Let's proceed with the latest TCM watchlist (as usual iffy/not-so-favorite titles asterisked), sorted by the last date to watch with alternate streaming services and links to my old capsule reviews where available:

10/1 - The Barkleys of Broadway (1949), Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939), A Hard Day's Night (1964 | HBO Max, Criterion Channel), The Misfits (1961), The Young Girls of Rochefort/Les Demoiselles de Rochefort (1967 | HBO, Criterion)
10/2 - East of Eden (1955)
10/3 - Dinner at Eight (1933 | Criterion), The Man from Laramie (1955), What's Up, Doc? (1972 | HBO)
10/4 - Camille (1936), Les Girls (1957), Moonfleet (1955)
10/5 - Aparajito/The Unvanquished (1956 | Amazon Prime, HBO, Criterion, Eros Now, hoichoi), Citizen Kane (1941 | HBO), Malcolm X (1992 | HBO), Seven Days in May (1964), To Be or Not to Be (1942 | HBO, Criterion)
10/6 - The Battle of Algiers/La battaglia di Algeri (1966 | HBO, Criterion)
10/7 - Baby Doll (1956), King Kong (1933 | HBO), Tea and Sympathy (1956 | Criterion)
10/8 - The Most Dangerous Game (1932 | Prime, HBO, Paramount+, Criterion, FlixFling)
10/9 - A Fistful of Dollars/Per un pugno di dollari (1964 | Prime, HBO), For a Few Dollars More/Per qualche dollaro in più (1965 | Prime, HBO), Shall We Dance (1937)
10/11 - Born to Dance (1936), The Naked City (1948 | HBO, Criterion)
10/12 - Blind Chance (1987 | Criterion), Show Boat (1936), Sweet Smell of Success (1957)
10/14 - An Affair to Remember (1957 | Criterion), Vivacious Lady (1938)
10/15 - Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931), Susan and God (1940)*
10/16 - Dark Passage (1947), It's Always Fair Weather (1955)
10/17 - The Magician (1958 | Criterion)
10/19 - Doctor Zhivago (1965 | HBO)*, The Human Condition I: No Greater Love (1959 | Criterion)
10/20 - Simon of the Desert/Simón del desierto (1965 | Criterion)
10/21 - Forbidden Planet (1956), Smiles of a Summer Night (1955 | Criterion)
10/22 - An Autumn Afternoon (1962 | Criterion), Cheyenne Autumn (1964), The Left Handed Gun (1958), The Lusty Men (1952)
10/23 - Cat People (1942), The Curse of the Cat People (1944)
10/26 - The Corn Is Green (1945), Easy Living (1949), The Human Condition II: Road to Eternity (1959 | Criterion)
10/28 - Brute Force (1947 | HBO, Criterion, FlixFling), Network (1976)*
10/31 - The Testament of Dr. Mabuse/Das Testament des Dr. Mabuse (1933 | HBO, Criterion)

Now that it's October you can expect horror titles to keep coming, but for now I see, in rough order of preference, Jacques Tourneur/Val Newton's extraordinary Cat People, its quasi-sequel The Curse of the Cat People (less horror than poetic fantasy and all the better for it) by Gunther von Fritsch and Robert Wise in the latter's directorial debut, Mamoulian's justly celebrated adaptation of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and The Most Dangerous Game. With more Tourneur/Newton and Dracula you should be set for Halloween. :happydevil::alien:

And that's not all. In honor of the inaugural National Silent Movie Day (which frankly strikes me as rather counterproductive - I would've joined forces with established film societies/organizations instead) TCM just unloaded a carefully curated batch of classics and TBDs. Here are all the silents on offer (FYI Modern Times is not part of this same batch, but still included here for the sake of programming):

10/6 - Flesh and the Devil (1926 | FlixFling), Within Our Gates (1920 | Paramount+, Criterion, MUBI)
10/7 - Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blaché (2018 | Curiosity Stream, Sundance Now), The Great Buster: A Celebration (2018), Piccadilly (1929), Sherlock, Jr. (1924 | IndieFlix), Sparrows (1926 | Paramount+), A Trip to the Moon/Le Voyage dans la Lune (1902)
10/9 - Modern Times (1936 | HBO, Criterion)
10/29 - Battleship Potemkin (1925 | HBO, Criterion, FlixFling), City Lights (1931 | HBO, Criterion), The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (1921), The Freshman (1925 | Criterion), The Passion of Joan of Arc/La Passion de Jeanne d'Arc (1928 | HBO, Criterion, FlixFling), The Wind (1928)

At least half of these - including the immortal Keaton, Méliès, Chaplin, Eisenstein and Dreyer masterpieces - are essential viewing, and while I've yet to see the rest myself I can report that they all seem to have been well received by critics past and present. Also while Be Natural is a fairly conventional (but informative) doc it's followed by three of Guy-Blaché's forward-looking shorts - Algie, the Miner (1912), A House Divided (1913) and Matrimony's Speed Limit (1913) - and chances are you have zero clue about this criminally neglected female film pioneer so make sure to check out the whole thing (yes, that's Jodie Foster narrating):


While I'm at it I'll also throw in two more worthy silents I happened to see recently. The more famous one by a country mile, indeed almost as famous as the 1959 remake among older viewers, is the first feature-length Ben-Hur (1925), sharing the same subtitle of A Tale of the Christ as Lew Wallace's 1880 novel and (mostly) directed by Fred Niblo. Since no aesthete would mistake this bloated flotsam of naive piety for high literature the movie had to make up for the kitsch in spectacle, so MGM went all in, throwing nearly $4 million into the project and thereby making it the most expensive film by far of the silent era (so expensive, in fact, that the studio still lost $698k despite $9 million in rentals). And you can rest assured the unprecedented budget wasn't wasted:


As expected the chariot race gets the lion's share of attention, and it is indeed an ingenious sequence that Wyler, one of the assistant directors, would reproduce almost frame by frame in his more familiar 1959 version, but I strongly urge you to follow this original feature from the start as its early mise-en-scène (you can catch glimpses in the above vid) is truly breathtaking. The luminous Nativity scenes illustrate why more color doesn't always mean better, while the wide shots of the imposing Roman structures evoke comparisons with the mythical architecture of Lang's grand Die Nibelungen (which was produced around the same time and released in 1924).

Hollywood extravaganzas simply don't get much better than this. Don't miss it when you get a chance.

The next recommendation, Across to Singapore (1928), isn't remotely in the same class, and I admit I probably would've skipped it but for the fact that a young Joan Crawford stars in it, but the ordinary romance is promptly upstaged by its exciting shipbound coda which serves as a textbook example of how to direct an action sequence without fancy gadgets or glitzy FX (this is the full movie so you may wanna watch sooner rather than later):


Now a couple replies:

Meet The Parents (2000).
Ugh :eek:

They actually made two sequels to this nonsense. Poor Deniro. Must have been going through a rough time to take up such movies.
Cat nipples weren't the only things getting milk with those sequels.
Haha its what we call ‘time pass’ movie.
Man y'all are trashing one of my not-so-guilty pleasures. How can you not dig this absolute howler?


Of course that's only warm-up for this classic scene:


Rob's deadpan delivery of that line is just pluperfect. Gets me every time. :-D
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
Haha its what we call ‘time pass’ movie.

Watched The Courier on Prime
Watching something called Outside In. Settled for it after much searching on Netflix.
It's offbeat, at least.

The Spanish movie I had watched the other day about four sisters who discover that their father is not the biological father is called Despite Everything. Sadly, i felt it was quite superficial.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
A short documentary titled "The Man Who Knew Too Much," which is an account of British PSYOP tactics in Northern Ireland and methods to manipulate the press domestically. Colin Wallace's knowledge of tactics is extensive and his account seems credible, but you never know, especially given his background in intelligence. The tactics mentioned reflect the adage, "The most useful propaganda causes the targets to move in the direction you desire for reasons they believe to be their own."

 

ollinger

G.O.A.T.
"Here Today" (2021)

Billy Crystal directs and stars in this melodrama about a comedy writer dealing with an illness. An overly sentimental tearjerker perhaps, but sweet and affecting.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
"The Bad and the Beautiful"


Over-the-top melodrama set in the old Hollywood scene. Schlocky, but entertaining. There are several interesting elements, including the cast (Lana Turner & Kirk Douglas) and trying to figure out who were the real people the characters were based upon.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Saturday night I finally got to see the entire Wolf of Wall Street. In honesty, I have to rate this over lengthy over the top Scorsese work as a total disappointment, maybe Marty’s worst. If I’m wanting a treatment of the excess of the financial market giants in the 70s/80s at least make me laugh. Black Monday does accomplish that and I don’t even stay on Showtime when their episodes air. Don Cheadle >>>> Leo Di.
 

Dilexson

Hall of Fame
Planning to catch the bond film this weekend.
Watched Point Break (1991) recently. Decent action film , wondering how this one turned into a cult classic though. Entertaining flick but weren't too many surprises.
Think I might binge watch the remaining Kathryn Bigelow films I haven't seen yet, she's damn good at directing action!
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Best $21.50 I have spent in a long time: watching the Craig coda in the role of James Bond in No Time To Die.

my timing was impeccable at the box office, showing up and having the option of waiting an hour for an IMAX screening OR immediately sitting for a 4DX Motion screening. I chose the latter and was immediately taken by the special effects of 4DX Motion in several of the preview trailers. The seats rock and roll in rhythm with action scenes and the glasses you wear make you feel you’re in the middle of the scene.

As to this final portrayal by Craig, he and the film did not disappoint. Great car chases and action stunts! Wonderful scenery in at least half a dozen locales from Jamaica/Cuba to London and Norwegian fjords.

Whether Craig met your tastes as a Bond, see this film. It is his best portrayal by far. His love interest is a refreshingly natural beauty, Lea Seydoux. Rami Malek is solid as the last villain Craig must deal with.

As I said, a great $21.50 spent and well worth the pandemic induced delay to see it in a cinema.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Have you considered suicide by cop? If the police where you live carry firearms it’s only going to take minimal effort by you. Grab a kitchen knife and call 911. When they knock on the door brandish the blade and they will gladly put you out of your terrible pain.
 
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