Whatever happened to Guillermo Coria?!!

donnygg

Rookie
From wikipedia


Coria never managed to recover from the service yips that damaged his game and kept his ranking hundreds of places below his once top 10 position. On April 28, 2009, he announced his retirement from professional tennis, saying that he "didn’t feel like competing anymore."

As of 2010, Coria is coaching his younger brother Federico, and has said that he has not ruled out a return to the ATP tour.
 
^^Yes, I wondered about him years ago. His career decline was surprising. He was a lot of fun to watch. I got to watch him play at the US Clay Court Championships many years ago when he was an up and coming player. He played a young Andy Roddick back then and you could tell that he could become a very dangerous clay courter (if not great on other surfaces). He announced his retirment in 2009. See this excerpt from Wikipedia about some of the circumstances which led to his retirement.





Coria has appeared in five finals since the 2004 French Open defeat and has lost four of them, the most famous of which being the fifth set tiebreak loss to the rising king of clay, Rafael Nadal, in the 2005 Rome Masters final. The only final Coria won was on July 31, 2005, when he won in Umag, Croatia by defeating Carlos Moyà in the final. Afterwards, Coria joked that the small tournament was considered a fifth Grand Slam in his family, because his wife Carla hails from Croatia. Coria had a surprisingly consistent 2005 season, where he was one of only three players that year to reach the fourth round or better at every Grand Slam, the others being Roger Federer and David Nalbandian.
Despite Coria having a consistent season in 2005, it was during his tournament victory in Umag that he started to suffer from the service yips, a psychological condition that renders a tennis player unable to hit the ball at the correct moment when serving. At first, it wasn't really noticed but it really came to light during the 2005 US Open when Coria served a combined 34 double faults in his fourth round win over Nicolás Massú and his quarter final loss to Robby Ginepri. Against Ginepri, having already saved 5 match points, Coria was serving to take the match into a fifth set tiebreaker, when two double faults in a row from deuce gave Ginepri the win.
As the 2005 season drew to a close, Coria's form started to dip alarmingly as a result of the high number of double faults he was serving in an increasing number of his matches. Coria lost 9 of his last 11 matches of 2005.
Coria's service yips got increasingly worse in 2006, although he still managed to reach the third round of the 2006 Australian Open and later managed a victory over Novak Djokovic at the 2006 Miami Masters without serving any double faults.
At the 2006 Monte Carlo Masters, Coria came back from 1-6, 1-5 down to defeat Paul-Henri Mathieu despite serving 20 double faults in the match, and Coria then defeated Nicolas Kiefer despite serving 22 double faults, but he was then easily beaten by Rafael Nadal in the quarter finals. After Monte Carlo, Coria wins generally became fewer and further between, although he did manage a semi final in Amersfoort in July 2006.
Coria withdrew from the 2006 French Open and Wimbledon as he attempted to sort out the problems with his game, recover from an elbow injury, and rediscover his old form. In August 2006 he hired Horacio de la Peña as his tennis coach. At the 2006 US Open, Coria retired in his first round match against Ryan Sweeting after just 5 games. It would be 17 months before Coria played a match on the ATP tour again.
Coria made his return in a Challenger in Belo Horizonte Brazil on October 22, 2007. He lost the first set 6–3 to fellow Argentine Juan Pablo Brzezicki and subsequently retired with a back injury. He had been leading in the first set 3–1.
Coria finally returned to the main ATP circuit in the Movistar Open in Chile on January 28, 2008. He showed positive signs of recovering his form, but was still defeated in the first round by Pablo Cuevas 6–4, 4–6, 6–3.
In February, in his second ATP Circuit appearance of the year, Coria defeated Italian qualifier Francesco Aldi 6–4 7–5. It was his first ATP victory in 19 months.
As a result of Andy Roddick's withdrawal from the 2008 French Open due to a back injury, Coria made his first Grand Slam appearance since the 2006 US Open in taking the place of the American. He faced Tommy Robredo, the three-time quarter-finalist and #12 seed, in the first round. Coria was defeated in four sets as Robredo won 5-7, 6-4, 6-1, 6-4, but Coria's performance led to some optimism, even from Coria himself, who was close to forcing a fifth set.
Coria never managed to recover from the service yips that damaged his game and kept his ranking hundreds of places below his once top 10 position. On April 28, 2009, he announced his retirement from professional tennis, saying that he "didn’t feel like competing anymore."[2]
Coria attended preschool with David Nalbandian in Argentina.
He is a well known River Plate fan.
As of 2010, Coria is coaching his younger brother Federico, and has said that he has not ruled out a return to the ATP tour.
 
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Mustard

Talk Tennis Guru
The service yips killed Coria's career. It was bad enough in the closing months of 2005, but it got far worse in 2006 and, at times, he was unable to even stun a serve in without any pace. The more recent matches I have of Coria's were at 2006 Monte Carlo, where he beat Mathieu 1-6, 7-6, 6-4, after coming back from 1-6, 1-5 down, despite Coria having served 20 double faults in the match. Coria then beat Kiefer in the next round by the score of 6-7, 6-4, 6-3, despite having served something like 23 double faults. Nadal then crushed Coria 6-2, 6-1, in the quarter finals.

I also have one of the last matches Coria played before the service yips hit him, his 2005 Davis Cup match against Hewitt.

Despite the service yips ruining Coria's career, the myth persists amongst many tennis fans that Coria fell away from tennis because of the 2004 French Open final.
 

Meles

Bionic Poster
The service yips killed Coria's career. It was bad enough in the closing months of 2005, but it got far worse in 2006 and, at times, he was unable to even stun a serve in without any pace. The more recent matches I have of Coria's were at 2006 Monte Carlo, where he beat Mathieu 1-6, 7-6, 6-4, after coming back from 1-6, 1-5 down, despite Coria having served 20 double faults in the match. Coria then beat Kiefer in the next round by the score of 6-7, 6-4, 6-3, despite having served something like 23 double faults. Nadal then crushed Coria 6-2, 6-1, in the quarter finals.

I also have one of the last matches Coria played before the service yips hit him, his 2005 Davis Cup match against Hewitt.

Despite the service yips ruining Coria's career, the myth persists amongst many tennis fans that Coria fell away from tennis because of the 2004 French Open final.
 

Meles

Bionic Poster
Wow. Coria thinks he should have made 2003 Final:
(He concluded speaking about his French Open runs: "I could not manage my anxiety and I was not experienced in handling this situation. In the 2003 semifinal against Verkerk, he broke the racket and I lost focus and I could not keep playing and I lost a match I did not have to lose.”)

]https://www.tennisw orldusa.org/tennis/news/Rafael_Nadal/72033/we-all-knew-in-2004-that-rafael-nadal-would-dominate-coria/
 
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