What's the protocol for string overlap on outside of frame?

#1
Sorry for another newbie question.

But this forum is so useful to me.

If, when stringing crosses, a string needs to 'overlap' other strings on the outside of the frame.

What is the protocol.

I understand that they should never cross.

But what if a cross pokes through the middle of two strings in the outside of the frame?

Cheers, Paul
 
#2
They would run side by side on the outside of the frame. Sometimes easier said than done.

EDIT: More often than not I put the tie off string above the anchor string in the tie off hole. If it goes in the bottom I flip it around the anchor string. So I want to tie off string goes over a string blocking the last cross. Blunt needles, pathfinder awls, strings cut ti a point, etc... help get the tie off string on top.
 

PBODY99

Hall of Fame
#4
Overlaps at the head of the frame are an error. At the throat, you do not risk damaging the string on court contact. If you plan ahead a scrap piece of string inserted into the cross hole , before you tie off the mains make it easier to slide the cross in. You will get it with practice.
 
#7
Great question. I was thinking about this the other day.

I've done several Pro Staff string jobs recently. In some cases the overlaps have been nice, in others they have been terrible.

But in all cases, the player has not reported any differences in feel or playability of the string job over the life of it.
 
#8
Sorry for another newbie question.

But this forum is so useful to me.

If, when stringing crosses, a string needs to 'overlap' other strings on the outside of the frame.

What is the protocol.

I understand that they should never cross.

But what if a cross pokes through the middle of two strings in the outside of the frame?

Cheers, Paul
Most will tell you that splitting the middle is against protocol. I'll do it occasionally especially with softer strings where I might not be able to get them in without going through the middle. It also depends on placement. Near the top of the racket they all need to lie down so they don't pop if you bump the racket on a low ball. Near the throat, it isn't such a problem. Some rackets are worse than others like most of the burn line. The shared holes at the bottom and weird patterns lead to a lot of string all coming together.
 
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