When your opponent is on fire, it does not phase me one bit

#1
....because reversion to the mean.


Rafa has the exact same mindset.

https://www.braingametennis.com/gday-diego/

On the 2008 Wimbledon Final v Roger Federer.
When Federer has these patches of utter brilliance, the only thing you can do is try and stay calm, wait for the storm to pass. You can’t let yourself be demoralized; you have to remember – or you have to convince yourself – that he cannot possibly sustain that level of play game after game, that if you stay cool and stick to your game plan and keep trying to wear him down and make him uncomfortable, he’ll leave the zone sooner or later. His mental intensity will slacken, and you’ll have your chance.Rafael Nadal
 
#2
So true. This is exactly how I set my mindset when playing someone better than me.

The moment they arent playing “perfect”, it can be a letdown for them. The hangover can cause huge momentum swings in my favor.
 
#5
Some days we can't miss. The ball is the size of a basketball and the court is an ocean. Some days we catch fire the whole day. Sometimes we get on a roll for a few days, a week, a month. Sometimes it's a set or a few games. It's hard to tell at the time when you're playing someone what kind of day they're having, unless they've had some recent history of being on fire. Having said that this could be the day that the fire gets put out. But like it's said here you just have to believe that they can't sustain that level or maybe you'll find a way to make their level drop. That's why tennis is one of the most mental sports out there.
 
#6
When your opponent can't miss, I call it "Blind Squirrel Mode" (trademark pending). The secret is just riding it out since it will end. Up your focus and concentration, accept that it may go on for a few games, but eventually it will end and they will probably start making a lot of unforced errors trying to get back into that mode. Longest I've seen it last is 4 games.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
#7
I have never seen a club player "on fire," even at the top true 4.5 level. The term is usually used by their losing opponents who want to feel better about their loss.
 
#8
I have never seen a club player "on fire," even at the top true 4.5 level. The term is usually used by their losing opponents who want to feel better about their loss.
I play against my wife sometimes and she'll be framing winners just over the net and hitting lines for many points in a row. You have to almost laugh. My favorite is the on the run BH stabbing lob that lands on the baseline just as I'm approaching the net ready for the easy putaway. She has that shot mastered in Blind Squirrel Mode (TM).

I'm sure even you have faced the opponent that suddenly starts pulling amazing shots out of their butt. Just ride it out. Never lasts too long at rec levels.
 

OnTheLine

Hall of Fame
#9
When your opponent can't miss, I call it "Blind Squirrel Mode" (trademark pending). The secret is just riding it out since it will end. Up your focus and concentration, accept that it may go on for a few games, but eventually it will end and they will probably start making a lot of unforced errors trying to get back into that mode. Longest I've seen it last is 4 games.
Perhaps it depends on level to begin with.

I think BSM is what you see at 2.5/3.0 level and yes, about 4 games I would agree is max.

But the moments of "zone" or "on fire" is something more at 3.5+ players ... I think these zones last longer and it is more about the player who already has all the shots and capabilities but are having a period of few errors and great decision making.

Whereas the 2.5/3.0 player in BSM doesn't have the shots regularly but is fluking into them during those moments.
 
#10
Perhaps it depends on level to begin with.

I think BSM is what you see at 2.5/3.0 level and yes, about 4 games I would agree is max.

But the moments of "zone" or "on fire" is something more at 3.5+ players ... I think these zones last longer and it is more about the player who already has all the shots and capabilities but are having a period of few errors and great decision making.

Whereas the 2.5/3.0 player in BSM doesn't have the shots regularly but is fluking into them during those moments.
I think there probably is a difference between BSM and "in the zone". BSM mixes in fluke with reduced UE's to win points on what are probably dumb overly aggressive decisions. In the zone is a state of seeing the ball as big as a beach ball and feeling your strokes as a true extension of your body. BSM can be seen all the way to 4.0 where people get on a "can't miss streak" of aggressive shots that always land in. Beyond 4.0, players don't tend to make the stupid decisions as frequently.

In the zone is seen everywhere and the best way to put it is the player elevates their play level by .5 NTRP. It can last for as long as weeks. I've seen it more obviously in golf where I can go from shooting my usual mid 80's to suddenly getting on a steak of shooting rounds in the high 70's. My swing just comes together for a bunch of rounds and golf seems so much easier.

You can hang on and beat the BSM because it won't last. Someone that's elevated their game into the zone will beat you unless you raise your game. Hanging on won't work because they are playing at a higher level.
 
#12
I think there probably is a difference between BSM and "in the zone". BSM mixes in fluke with reduced UE's to win points on what are probably dumb overly aggressive decisions. In the zone is a state of seeing the ball as big as a beach ball and feeling your strokes as a true extension of your body. BSM can be seen all the way to 4.0 where people get on a "can't miss streak" of aggressive shots that always land in. Beyond 4.0, players don't tend to make the stupid decisions as frequently.

In the zone is seen everywhere and the best way to put it is the player elevates their play level by .5 NTRP. It can last for as long as weeks. I've seen it more obviously in golf where I can go from shooting my usual mid 80's to suddenly getting on a steak of shooting rounds in the high 70's. My swing just comes together for a bunch of rounds and golf seems so much easier.

You can hang on and beat the BSM because it won't last. Someone that's elevated their game into the zone will beat you unless you raise your game. Hanging on won't work because they are playing at a higher level.
Beating BMS [Bethany Mattek-Sands], on the other hand, is another matter altogether.
 
#14
I have never seen a club player "on fire," even at the top true 4.5 level. The term is usually used by their losing opponents who want to feel better about their loss.
It really is unfair to judge others based on your own sublime set of skills and established Sureshsian Standards (tm). You have become jaded.
 
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