Where can you stand in doubles???????

pabletion

Hall of Fame
The specific question: Can players stand wherever they want during doubles? For example, if I'm serving on the deuce side, can my partner stand on the deuce side as well?
I attempted to do this yesterday: me serving deuce side, my partner at net on the deuce side as well, so I would serve and immediately switch to the ad side. The other team complained and said that cant be done, that the other player has to be on the other side, before the serve (basically, can only switch or enter my side only while the ball is in play).

Local Davis Cup captain told me last year that there is no ruling that specifies WHERE the other player should stand so.......................... now Im confused.

Anyone know?
 

Chalkdust

Semi-Pro
The specific question: Can players stand wherever they want during doubles? For example, if I'm serving on the deuce side, can my partner stand on the deuce side as well?
I attempted to do this yesterday: me serving deuce side, my partner at net on the deuce side as well, so I would serve and immediately switch to the ad side. The other team complained and said that cant be done, that the other player has to be on the other side, before the serve (basically, can only switch or enter my side only while the ball is in play).

Local Davis Cup captain told me last year that there is no ruling that specifies WHERE the other player should stand so.......................... now Im confused.

Anyone know?
Weak troll post attempt?
A "Hall of Fame" member surely already knows the answer to this.
Every hear of Australian formation or I-Formation? Or watch any pro dubs?
 

pabletion

Hall of Fame
Weak troll post attempt?
A "Hall of Fame" member surely already knows the answer to this.
Every hear of Australian formation or I-Formation? Or watch any pro dubs?
I've been playing tennis for 24 yrs, and I have NO IDEA about this ruling, mostly bc I'm a singles player, have very little doubles competition, and Im about to play a doubles tournament.

Yes, I'm aware of the "I" formation, but again, that is not as extreme as what I'm proposing. When you do the "I" formation, you stand on the ad box, close to the center line (dont even know if you can actually have one foot inside the deuce box, before the ball is struck by the server). Whan I mean is, the guy at net standing inside the deuce box before I serve, or even, standing at the baseline to my right, ready to play the deuce side, while Im serving from the deuce side.

24 yrs of tennis, I DONT KNOW if this is allowed or not.
 

Chalkdust

Semi-Pro
I've been playing tennis for 24 yrs, and I have NO IDEA about this ruling, mostly bc I'm a singles player, have very little doubles competition, and Im about to play a doubles tournament.

Yes, I'm aware of the "I" formation, but again, that is not as extreme as what I'm proposing. When you do the "I" formation, you stand on the ad box, close to the center line (dont even know if you can actually have one foot inside the deuce box, before the ball is struck by the server). Whan I mean is, the guy at net standing inside the deuce box before I serve, or even, standing at the baseline to my right, ready to play the deuce side, while Im serving from the deuce side.

24 yrs of tennis, I DONT KNOW if this is allowed or not.
It's allowed. Look up Australian formation.

Improve Your Tennis Game: Australian Formation Doubles (usta.com)
 
D

Deleted member 776614

Guest
You're allowed to stand anywhere on your side of the net, inside or outside the court - per ITF Rules of Tennis 2021, Rule 26, Case 5.

Case 5: In doubles, where are the server’s partner and receiver’s partner allowed to stand? Decision: The server’s partner and the receiver’s partner may take any position on their own side of the net, inside or outside the court. However, if a player is creating a hindrance to the opponent(s), the hindrance rule should be used.
 

pabletion

Hall of Fame
Thanks! Was actually bamboozled yesterday, playing a practice doubles. Was told by one of our opponents that it was illegal to stand in the same half before the serve was hit (either inside the box or the same half of the court in general!).
 

Vox Rationis

Semi-Pro
As far as I know the only limit on positioning (other than where the server stands) is the opposing net player can’t stand in the service box during the serve to their partner.
 

JLyon

Hall of Fame
opponents today with female partner serving in MXD, her partner was 2ft from to await the return. pretty much Australian doubles, then did same thing in when she received
 

socallefty

Legend
As far as I know the only limit on positioning (other than where the server stands) is the opposing net player can’t stand in the service box during the serve to their partner.
Not right - the returner’s partner can stand in the returner’s service box if they want. Of course if they get hit by the serve on the fly, their team loses the point. There are no restrictions on where anyone can stand either on the server or returner’s team except that the server cannot be outside the doubles sidelines or inside the court in his serve stance.
 

JLyon

Hall of Fame
As far as I know the only limit on positioning (other than where the server stands) is the opposing net player can’t stand in the service box during the serve to their partner.
sure they can, they can stand in the service box as long as they are not trying to actively distract. A nice hard serve at that partner can earn some free points, the server just has to know who is returning and by the 2nd point that is known.
 
Reference

ITF Rules of Tennis
https://www.itftennis.com/media/2510/2020-rules-of-tennis-english.pdf
26. HINDRANCE If a player is hindered in playing the point by a deliberate act of the opponent(s), the player shall win the point. However, the point shall be replayed if a player is hindered in playing the point by either an unintentional act of the opponent(s), or something outside the player’s own control (not including a permanent fixture).
.............
Case 5: In doubles, where are the server’s partner and receiver’s partner allowed to stand? Decision: The server’s partner and the receiver’s partner may take any position on their own side of the net, inside or outside the court. However, if a player is creating a hindrance to the opponent(s), the hindrance rule should be used.
 
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As long as your team's serves aren't patty-cake tap-ins, I-formation and Australia are lethal at 3.5 and below doubles. It'll produce so many nervy down-the-line returns that go straight into the net.
 

Vox Rationis

Semi-Pro
sure they can, they can stand in the service box as long as they are not trying to actively distract. A nice hard serve at that partner can earn some free points, the server just has to know who is returning and by the 2nd point that is known.
I've encountered this situation twice at the college level and both times the ruling was you can't stand in the box. But I'm seeing conflicting info online about it. I see two sites saying that you specifically can't stand in the service box to receive, including on the lines. And I see a USTA facebook post saying you can stand anywhere you like. I don't know if it has to do with the governing body (i.e. USTA vs NCAA vs ITF) or if it maybe boils down to interpretation of the hinderance rule? Standing in the box might be considered a hinderance to the server.
 

JLyon

Hall of Fame
I've encountered this situation twice at the college level and both times the ruling was you can't stand in the box. But I'm seeing conflicting info online about it. I see two sites saying that you specifically can't stand in the service box to receive, including on the lines. And I see a USTA facebook post saying you can stand anywhere you like. I don't know if it has to do with the governing body (i.e. USTA vs NCAA vs ITF) or if it maybe boils down to interpretation of the hinderance rule? Standing in the box might be considered a hinderance to the server.
because that is an ITA rule not ITF or USTA
 

J_R_B

Hall of Fame
Last summer, in a 4.0 men's double tournament, there was a team where one of the guys was a singles player. When his partner served on the deuce side, he would stand right next to him on the baseline on the deuce side. The guy S&V'd approaching cross court so that they would end up in a normal up-back position, but with the players reversed (i.e. with the stronger volleyer volleying and the stronger ground strokes back). It was one of the strangest things I've ever seen in tennis, but the won the tournament, so I guess it worked.
 
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zaskar1

Semi-Pro
The specific question: Can players stand wherever they want during doubles? For example, if I'm serving on the deuce side, can my partner stand on the deuce side as well?
I attempted to do this yesterday: me serving deuce side, my partner at net on the deuce side as well, so I would serve and immediately switch to the ad side. The other team complained and said that cant be done, that the other player has to be on the other side, before the serve (basically, can only switch or enter my side only while the ball is in play).

Local Davis Cup captain told me last year that there is no ruling that specifies WHERE the other player should stand so.......................... now Im confused.

Anyone know?
according to USTA rules, you can stand anywhere on your side of the court, even in the service box, but i wouldnt recommend it unless you
can duck really fast!
z
 

S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
Last summer, in a 4.0 men's double tournament, there was a team where one of the guys was a singles player. When his partner served on the deuce side, he would stand right next to him on the baseline on the deuce side. The guy S&V'd approaching cross court so that they would end up in a normal up-back position, but with the players reversed (i.e. with the stronger volleyer volleying and the stronger ground strokes back). It was one of the strangest things I've ever seen in tennis, but the won the tournament, so I guess it worked.
I've played against the same positioning in MXDs. I did a double-take when they first lined up but quickly realized it was so the woman could play her preferred side.
 

Vox Rationis

Semi-Pro
I've played against the same positioning in MXDs. I did a double-take when they first lined up but quickly realized it was so the woman could play her preferred side.
Oh I’ve seen twice where they did it so that the man could play singles and not let the woman touch the ball unless she absolutely had to.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
Last summer, in a 4.0 men's double tournament, there was a team where one of the guys was a singles player. When his partner served on the deuce side, he would stand right next to him on the baseline on the deuce side. The guy S&V'd approaching cross court so that they would end up in a normal up-back position, but with the players reversed (i.e. with the stronger volleyer volleying and the stronger ground strokes back). It was one of the strangest things I've ever seen in tennis, but the won the tournament, so I guess it worked.
This happens not infrequently when the serves are weak such as mixed doubles. Rather than get returns pasted at the net person, both players stay back. then the most net accomplished player gets up to the net ASAP.
 

DCNJ

New User
This happens not infrequently when the serves are weak such as mixed doubles. Rather than get returns pasted at the net person, both players stay back. then the most net accomplished player gets up to the net ASAP.
I've also seen it with both players coming in together--though I'm wondering if I'm reading the initial situation correctly--was the initial poster saying they were both on the deuce side? If that's the case I haven't seen that--what I've seen is two back with one on deuce and one on ad.
 

J_R_B

Hall of Fame
This happens not infrequently when the serves are weak such as mixed doubles. Rather than get returns pasted at the net person, both players stay back. then the most net accomplished player gets up to the net ASAP.
It's not just both back. They were both back on the deuce side, and no one was playing ad until the server S&V'd cross court to get to the net on the ad side. You can't have a weak serve to do that or the serves are just going to be blasted up the line before the server can get over to cover. I'd never seen that before.
 

mikej

Hall of Fame
ITA rule book says (PDF warning):

"The receiver’s partner shall not enter receiver’s service box before or during the serve"

Seems to be an ITA only thing
because the ITA (correctly) realizes this is only ever done as an attempt to distract the server

the only situation a ref should allow the returner’s partner to stand in service box is if they remain there throughout the service motion / until after the serve is struck - if they move away during the serve, the intent is completely clear and an obvious hindrance

if they want to remain in the box until after the serve has been struck, likely losing the point by being struck with the serve or interfering with their partner’s ability to track the serve, sure, have at it - but no one ever does that
 

Shaolin

G.O.A.T.
Sure you can. You just need to let the ball bounce first. I’ve had opponents underhand serve me, and I had to run into the box to return the serve.
Good point. I was picturing volleying the return when I said you cant return from inside the line which you cannot do. If it bounces first its ok like you said.
 

Purestriker

Professional
As long as your team's serves aren't patty-cake tap-ins, I-formation and Australia are lethal at 3.5 and below doubles. It'll produce so many nervy down-the-line returns that go straight into the net.
That formation definitely messes with people and takes them while to get used to it.
 

leech

Semi-Pro
I played a 7.0 MXD match where the elderly 3.0 lady stood off the court the entire second set except when receiving/serving, while her young 4.5-level 4.0 partner basically played singles. We lost that set.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
I played a 7.0 MXD match where the elderly 3.0 lady stood off the court the entire second set except when receiving/serving, while her young 4.5-level 4.0 partner basically played singles. We lost that set.
Which is why mixed should be mandated to be same level and be done with it. Let the 5.0 men play singles and men's doubles.
 

Matthew ATX

Semi-Pro
Which is why mixed should be mandated to be same level and be done with it. Let the 5.0 men play singles and men's doubles.
Eh. I won't pretend I like playing 5.0 guys in 9.0 mixed, but it has nothing to do with their going hero mode. I'd love nothing more than to have them try to put their partner in a corner and cover the whole court. They'd lose every time.
7.0 is about the highest level where you can really succeed with hero mode, at least in my experience playing 7.0, 8.0 and 9.0 and seeing people try it.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
Eh. I won't pretend I like playing 5.0 guys in 9.0 mixed, but it has nothing to do with their going hero mode. I'd love nothing more than to have them try to put their partner in a corner and cover the whole court. They'd lose every time.
7.0 is about the highest level where you can really succeed with hero mode, at least in my experience playing 7.0, 8.0 and 9.0 and seeing people try it.
doesnt matter to me whether they win or lose, it’s just that it changes the dynamic of the game so much, it loses its entertainment value. At least for me.

My best doubles experiences are when all 4 players are close in skill level. You have find an opponents weakness rather than the weakest opponent.
 

Connor35

New User
I played a 7.0 MXD match where the elderly 3.0 lady stood off the court the entire second set except when receiving/serving, while her young 4.5-level 4.0 partner basically played singles. We lost that set.
I just dont see how this is fun for anyone.

Though the key may be to lob the guy into corners then if he hits good ground strokes back to put it where he aint.
 

leech

Semi-Pro
I just dont see how this is fun for anyone.

Though the key may be to lob the guy into corners then if he hits good ground strokes back to put it where he aint.
He actually apologized after the match and said he would never do that again. His partner (the team captain) actually didn't mind b/c she wanted to win and knew she was a liability. We ended up figuring things out in the match TB and beat them anyway.
 

ichaseballs

Semi-Pro
the part that irks me the most is that someone made up a rule and was adamant that it was correct.
you should have educated them for sure
 

S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
Eh. I won't pretend I like playing 5.0 guys in 9.0 mixed,
This is the only chance I [4.5] have to play against 5.0s, outside of 4.5+ league [which the USTA just discarded] or an Open tournament. I love the challenge.

7.0 is about the highest level where you can really succeed with hero mode, at least in my experience playing 7.0, 8.0 and 9.0 and seeing people try it.
I pulled it off a couple of times in 8.0. I heard the opposing woman complain to her partner, "I can't keep it away from him!". I wasn't trying to be a hero but I was trying to be very aggressive at net.
 

Cashman

Hall of Fame
My best doubles experiences are when all 4 players are close in skill level. You have find an opponents weakness rather than the weakest opponent.
Yeah, these sorts of mix-and-match doubles ratings where you can have people that are many levels apart on the same court have never made sense to me - maybe it is for flexibility or something

Although I have enjoyed combination doubles, which we have every year at our local club. Any pair can enter in any bracket as long as their combined ages fit a window - so Combo 80-90 could have pairs of two forty-somethings, or a 60-something father and his 20-something son.
 

S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
Yeah, these sorts of mix-and-match doubles ratings where you can have people that are many levels apart on the same court have never made sense to me - maybe it is for flexibility or something
It may not make sense but it makes cents.

Repeat after me: "Revenue Enhancement".
 
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