Where is the Pro torso rotation?

GAZ082

Rookie
Hi guys. I'm watching some Masters Madrid briefings and noted something that i just did not before (mainly because i was concentrating in the footwork), the torso rotation. I realized that the pros have almost none of it, they have good shoulder rotation (it is not crazy either, nothing like having the shoulder near the chin for example, like taught in the 'books') but almost none torso. So, what's the deal?
 

ubel

Professional
Hi guys. I'm watching some Masters Madrid briefings and noted something that i just did not before (mainly because i was concentrating in the footwork), the torso rotation. I realized that the pros have almost none of it, they have good shoulder rotation (it is not crazy either, nothing like having the shoulder near the chin for example, like taught in the 'books') but almost none torso. So, what's the deal?
would think that it keeps the stroke simple, so less to go wrong. also allows for more consistent control as the base from where you're swinging from (your midsection) is stable. there's got to be some though, as trunk rotation forces the shoulder's to rotate, are there any highlights we could watch?

Why thank you, good highlights :D Wow incredible hightlights reel.
 
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Oleg

New User
Torso and shoulders are rotated together, even if not to the same degree. When the balance is transfered to the back foot, it would be uncofortable and unnatural not to rotate the torso as well.

Pay attention to the position of the torso right before the forward swing is initiated (almost parallel to the side line). Compare torso position of the player when he is tracking the ball or recovering (parallel to the net).

Also, the degree of rotation would depend on the player's court position and the target location.
 

WildVolley

Legend
What do you think torso rotation means?

I watched that clip and I saw a lot of torso rotation. Of course, it isn't really completely independent of the hips. You're also correct to note that the shoulder rotation is greater than the torso rotation.

These terms are all relative, so maybe it isn't what you were expecting to see. It is interesting to note how professionals turn the whole body to get power into their forehands.

Note that the rotation is a lot less on a one-handed backhand or a running forehand out wide.
 

GAZ082

Rookie
The torso rotation shown is natural movement due body constrains, not the kind of "power rotation" that helps to generate more head speed. In fact, the running forehands have almost no torso rotation whatsoever.

Check for example the Tenn1sGuru video, there he shows a great deal of torso and leg work. Perhaps is Federer's style, i should check others.
 
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