Which grip do you use to start a rally?

Do you use your normal forehand grip when you start a rally? Sometimes when I see pro's start a rally they seem to be using continental.

I use a full western and i'm having issues keep the ball low. I end up looping deep high bouncing balls to my partner. They end up moving way back or slicing it back. When I try hit it low it drops within the service box and my partner has to hit it on the 2nd bounce or move up.
 

martin8768

Rookie
i use semi western, i normally use a western grip for groundstrokes, i try and not put as much spin on it, just get the rally going
 

Klatu Verata Necktie

Hall of Fame
I start rallies with my usual semi-western grip. I'm not aware of people returning serve or starting rallies with grips other than their usual grip. If people do this, why do they do it? What would be the advantage?
 

raiden031

Legend
Do you use your normal forehand grip when you start a rally? Sometimes when I see pro's start a rally they seem to be using continental.

I use a full western and i'm having issues keep the ball low. I end up looping deep high bouncing balls to my partner. They end up moving way back or slicing it back. When I try hit it low it drops within the service box and my partner has to hit it on the 2nd bounce or move up.
Wow. I have the exact same problem. The only difference is that I use a semi-western grip.
 

tennisdad65

Hall of Fame
I start rallies with my usual semi-western grip. I'm not aware of people returning serve or starting rallies with grips other than their usual grip. If people do this, why do they do it? What would be the advantage?
I think the OP is asking about a grip to start the rallying during practice.. not the grip for aan actual point during a set.
 

WildVolley

Legend
I play with a semi-western/extreme eastern grip, but I normally start a rally with a feed, where I drop a ball and hit it before it hits the ground with a continental grip forehand, using sort of a scooping motion. I don't try to put too much spin or pace on the ball.

I find that using the continental makes the feed easier.
 

DarthCow

Rookie
Yeah i use a continental. It gives your opponent a flat heavy ball to hit back.

I think its been said already, but dont put heaps of effort into hitting an offensive shot when you start the rally. Just give a heavy ball. Some people ive played with before a match literally try to make me make a mistake by dropping the ball, and taking an epic smack at the ball. Its actually really frustrating.

Although if you want to aggravate an opponent, you should do it.:):):)
 

raiden031

Legend
That is why I will never be a teaching pro. I am incapable of feeding tennis balls in the continental grip and instead use my SW grip with tons of topspin. Its either a moon ball or its a short ball. Plus, I am incapable of feeding lob balls for overhead practice. It is either way over their head or too low and short.
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
That is why I will never be a teaching pro. I am incapable of feeding tennis balls in the continental grip and instead use my SW grip with tons of topspin. Its either a moon ball or its a short ball. Plus, I am incapable of feeding lob balls for overhead practice. It is either way over their head or too low and short.
All western players start out like this, if it bothers you you will practice and get better.

I said that it was absolutely silly, and I practiced feeding until i got better at it.

I don't like not being able to do things on court, it really bothers me, so I practice to shore them up.

P.S. I feed to start rallys with a conti grip, and contact the ball just above my knee.

J
 

Josherer

Professional
Whoops.. i mis read this thread.. to start off a rally i use continental.. same with feeding when i'm coaching.
 
It is extremely annoying when you are casually rallying for fun, and your rally partner feeds the ball with a ton of topspin into the service ball, or extremely high like a lob. I use a western grip, and use a continental to feed the ball, trying to keep the ball deep between the service line and the baseline, at the start of a rally.

I would recommend using a different grip to feed like a continental if you normally use a pretty extreme forehand grip to do this, because it could discourage people from rallying with you. :D
 
I use a semi-western grip and the way I start a rally is by locking the wrist and coming up from below the ball with a slightly open racquet face and low racquet head speed. It gives an easy ball with some topsin.
 
Ok ill try continental and hitting just above the knee. I tried feeding with continental awhile back, but I was opening the racket too much and would turn into deep lobs.
 

rfprse

Professional
Continental.
I thought feeding with continental is a norm unless one needs to put some serious spin on the feeding ball for the purpose of a specific drill.
 
i sometimes use continental cos it looks cooler when feeding the ball, my usual western looks gay cos you have to do a massive swing to get the ball in where as a small swing with conti will do the trick. but usually i will just use western cos its just easier for me to get it in.
 

warneck

Rookie
If I am using hitting partners I always use my normal grip; SW FH. I just put the ball with rally pace, spin and height. This in 95% of my balls leaves my opponent with a ball to strike in his/her comfort zone.

If I feed people I switch to continental since it's ten times simpler. I also do this when warming up with my match opponent. Just start a paced medium heigh ball without any spin and they will strike it back.

If you are bad at starting balls, it may as well be because you're lazy. If you don't shoulder turn etc, you will end up with much more variety than if you consentrate.
 

(Blank)

Rookie
I usually use the continental grip to feed. It seems to be a whole lot easier and takes less energy to feed that way. Plus, my feeds are more consistent that way and doesn't give the other player that hard of a time as opposed to me trying to feed with my normal grip.
 
ANSWER: have been wondering about this forever, particularly why Federer (who has an eastern grip forehand starts with continental to start practice rallies). I think the main reason is TO KEEP HIS CONTACT POINT consistent. I use a semi-western forehand grip to start by dropping the ball slightly ahead of me and hit it without boucing by swinging upwards with the racquet vertically facing down and in front of me to impart a nice moderate amount of topspin. Doing so, I think I am an extremely good initial feeder for practice. However, sometimes I lose my contact with my regular forehand hitting it too far in front of me and hit too upwards on the ball and hitting it out. Using a continental grip to start a practice rally separates in my mind the initial forehand from my regular forehand and also allows me to hit the ball at the same contact point since u are just dropping the ball straight down which is not the way you would ever get a normal forehand. A weaker grip compensates for this. The other thing you could do which may be better but might look odd is to just toss the ball up a a little and let it bounce, then hit your regular forehand as if someone just hit a soft floater to you.
 
ANSWER: have been wondering about this forever, particularly why Federer (who has an eastern grip forehand starts with continental to start practice rallies). I think the main reason is TO KEEP HIS CONTACT POINT consistent. I use a semi-western forehand grip to start by dropping the ball slightly ahead of me and hit it without boucing by swinging upwards with the racquet vertically facing down and in front of me to impart a nice moderate amount of topspin. Doing so, I think I am an extremely good initial feeder for practice. However, sometimes I lose my contact with my regular forehand hitting it too far in front of me and hit too upwards on the ball and hitting it out. Using a continental grip to start a practice rally separates in my mind the initial forehand from my regular forehand and also allows me to hit the ball at the same contact point since u are just dropping the ball straight down which is not the way you would ever get a normal forehand. A weaker grip compensates for this. The other thing you could do which may be better but might look odd is to just toss the ball up a a little and let it bounce, then hit your regular forehand as if someone just hit a soft floater to you.
I think you are reading too much into this. Dropping the ball and feeding continental is just the superior way overall and it doesn't have to do with maintaining contact point. You can hit to any part of the court very easily, quickly, with different spins, and with not much effort. You can just let your arm swing very fluidly and hit the ball. With a different grip, you can't really do that because of the way your arm gets positioned. You have to contact the ball a little higher and away from you which complicates the feed.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
ANSWER: have been wondering about this forever, particularly why Federer (who has an eastern grip forehand starts with continental to start practice rallies). I think the main reason is TO KEEP HIS CONTACT POINT consistent. I use a semi-western forehand grip to start by dropping the ball slightly ahead of me and hit it without boucing by swinging upwards with the racquet vertically facing down and in front of me to impart a nice moderate amount of topspin. Doing so, I think I am an extremely good initial feeder for practice. However, sometimes I lose my contact with my regular forehand hitting it too far in front of me and hit too upwards on the ball and hitting it out. Using a continental grip to start a practice rally separates in my mind the initial forehand from my regular forehand and also allows me to hit the ball at the same contact point since u are just dropping the ball straight down which is not the way you would ever get a normal forehand. A weaker grip compensates for this. The other thing you could do which may be better but might look odd is to just toss the ball up a a little and let it bounce, then hit your regular forehand as if someone just hit a soft floater to you.
Does he really? Not so sure about that reasoning.

Tennis coaches typically feed balls to students, out of the air, with a Conti grip. Allows them to easily hit underspin, flat or with mild (to moderate) topspin. If Roger also does this, can't say I know for sure why.

I will sometimes also feed out of the air (no pre-hit bounce) with a Conti or semi-conti (Aussie) grip. However, I will often feed with a bounce-hit to many students, with an Eastern or SW grip. This allows me to hit with more TS. I believe it also helps with their rhythm (and split step timing).
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
All western players start out like this, if it bothers you you will practice and get better.

I said that it was absolutely silly, and I practiced feeding until i got better at it.

I don't like not being able to do things on court, it really bothers me, so I practice to shore them up.

P.S. I feed to start rallys with a conti grip, and contact the ball just above my knee.

J
Yeah it's pretty crazy to be good player and not be able to feed balls conti or feed lobs to people.

I start rallies in many ways. Sometimes I'll feed conti without letting the ball bounce. Sometimes I'll bounce it and roll a topspin FH in. If I'm feeling cheeky, I'll bounce feed a topspin 1HBH (I'm a natural 2HBH player). It's just practice so I'm not fussing too much at that point.
 

Fintft

Legend
I usually bounce feed a topspin 1HBH , just to warm that one up (in order to hit relaxed and deep).

For the FH feeding, I use E grip.
 

golden chicken

Hall of Fame
I think the simpler answer is pro player groundstrokes are grooved to reflect incoming pace and reverse incoming topspin. A hand fed ball has neither.

Therefore, a player has an easier time hitting a flat continental forehand feed to start the rally because they are hitting through the ball much more than usual in order to give it the depth it needs to carry to the opposing baseline.
 

Clay lover

Hall of Fame

The Lock and Roll guy (who was at least a 6.0 at some point) actually claims that in addition to the conti, we actually use some backspin on the feed. Dunno whether that's what every pro does
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru

The Lock and Roll guy (who was at least a 6.0 at some point) actually claims that in addition to the conti, we actually use some backspin on the feed. Dunno whether that's what every pro does
Will feed flat or mild / moderate backspin for novice & low intermediate players. Will incorporate TS, often off a bounce, for higher level players or when a player has mastered a particular skill.
 
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