Which is your favorite red wine?

Which is your favorite red wine?


  • Total voters
    43

travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
Which (and why)?
Mine is Malbec.
I may be closing this poll in 10 minutes.
When I was living in your neck of the woods, I found a few unbiquitous Malbecs that were smooth and very drinkable.

Finca La Linda Malbec was one of my go-to wines after long day. But Malbecs can be all over the map - some are terrible. I can’t stand Fon du Cave.

In the US, I gravitate toward Pinot Noirs as they are safer. I pretty much hate most Cabs and Merlots. I like low acidity, so I avoid wines labeled as ‘well-balanced.’ Also like low tannin. I’m a sucker for dessert wines.

That said, I try to limit my wine consumption and save it for celebratory occasions.
 

Sudacafan

Talk Tennis Guru


'The Sideways Effect': How A Wine-Obsessed Film Reshaped The Industry

"Pinot noir production in California has increased roughly 170 percent since Sideways was released," says wine industry analyst Gabriel Froymovich of Vineyard Financial Associates, noting that total wine grape production has increased 7 to 8 percent during the same time. "I think people who were into wine saw the passion for pinot noir in the movie, decided to explore that variety a bit, and realized how lovely a wine that grape makes."

The Sideways Effect is also generally credited with depressing the market for merlot wine […] In a 2009 case study, Steven Cuellar, an economics professor at Sonoma State University, found a measurable decline in merlot sales of about 2 percent from January 2005 (the film was released in October 2004) through 2008. During that same time period, pinot noir sales increased 16 percent — it's now the second-most-planted varietal in California's Sonoma County.
I was about to write about this. A movie shaping the wine industry.
 

Sudacafan

Talk Tennis Guru
When I was living in your neck of the woods, I found a few unbiquitous Malbecs that were smooth and very drinkable.

Finca La Linda Malbec was one of my go-to wines after long day. But Malbecs can be all over the map - some are terrible. I can’t stand Fon du Cave.

In the US, I gravitate toward Pinot Noirs as they are safer. I pretty much hate most Cabs and Merlots. I like low acidity, so I avoid wines labeled as ‘well-balanced.’ Also like low tannin. I’m a sucker for dessert wines.

That said, I try to limit my wine consumption and save it for celebratory occasions.
They say that Malbec, though of France origin, isn’t as good as South American.
That’s because Mendoza’s terroirs are excellent for that grape, which in Europe is not top rated.
 

travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
They say that Malbec, though of France origin, isn’t as good as South American.
That’s because Mendoza’s terroirs are excellent for that grape, which in Europe is not top rated.
I was introduced to Malbec 10 years ago on my first visit to BA. I was wined and dined by a colleague on good ones from Norton and Trumpeter. So now I have good vibes associated with Malbecs.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster


'The Sideways Effect': How A Wine-Obsessed Film Reshaped The Industry

"Pinot noir production in California has increased roughly 170 percent since Sideways was released," says wine industry analyst Gabriel Froymovich of Vineyard Financial Associates, noting that total wine grape production has increased 7 to 8 percent during the same time. "I think people who were into wine saw the passion for pinot noir in the movie, decided to explore that variety a bit, and realized how lovely a wine that grape makes."

The Sideways Effect is also generally credited with depressing the market for merlot wine […] In a 2009 case study, Steven Cuellar, an economics professor at Sonoma State University, found a measurable decline in merlot sales of about 2 percent from January 2005 (the film was released in October 2004) through 2008. During that same time period, pinot noir sales increased 16 percent — it's now the second-most-planted varietal in California's Sonoma County.
The sad part is much of California’s winery districts is too warm for ideal pinot noir grape growing. Go north for sure...there are quite a few Oregon and Washington PNs.
 

Kevin T

Hall of Fame
The sad part is much of California’s winery districts is too warm for ideal pinot noir grape growing. Go north for sure...there are quite a few Oregon and Washington PNs.
Mostly true but some GREAT Pinots from the coast, areas like Monterey/Santa Lucia hills, Santa Barbara County and the Russian River area. Also very $$$$$. :) My wife's college rommate is a winemaker for a great winery in Napa, so I get some nice discounts.
 

Kevin T

Hall of Fame
Generally more of a Cab fan, particularly on the leathery/smoky end vs fruit forward but wife and I really love Belle Glos Clark and Telephone Pinot right now. It's darker and more full-bodied than your typical Pinot. Some even call it a concentrated Pinot Noir. All I know is it's delicious! :) Only problem is it's ~$50/bottle. Also love Scott Family Pinot Noir, generally <$25. For Cheaper wine, I really like a red blend South African wine called The Wolftrap. It's typically <$10 and Bev Mo carries it.
 

Zara

Legend
I love red wine and my favouirte is most probably Australian Shiraz. To be more specific, I like merlot, cabernet sauvignon, malbec and pinot noir the most.

I've been trying Ontario wine selection a great deal since last year and I must say they don't disappoint.

I am cutting down alcohol though to once or twice a month these days.
 

Tennis_Hands

Bionic Poster
This topic is complicated. That is like asking a mother to choose between her children: a decisive and straightforward choice is simply impossible. Instead I will list the types of wines that I like:

For powerful and complex wines:

Barolo from the Nebbiolo grape.
Cote Rotie and Hermitage wines from Syrah grape.
Bordeaux from Pauillac

For rustical wines:

Cahors and Madiran from Malbec and Tannat grapes.

For powerful and delicate wines:

Bordeaux from Margaux, St. Emillion and Pomerol from Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Merlot grapes.

For refined wines:

Burgundy from Beaune from Pinot Noir.

 

Tennis_Hands

Bionic Poster
You're nitpicking as usual. There are different levels of ripeness.
I'm not an expert but I have tried countless wines in my life and good mild domestic wine is what I like the most. It's actually something completely different from any brand wine I've ever tried. Even the strong domestic wine is better and completely different. If that's not pleasing to you palate - fine, enjoy what you like.
I am not "nitpicking". What you are saying would mean that an inferior and possibly defective grapes are used. I don't mind personal preferences, so what I am saying has nothing to do with your taste. It has to do with the principles of winemaking and how what you are saying fits into them. Needless to say, while your taste is your own, your implications (that the violation of those principles is a valuable knowledge that produces excellent results) are questionable.

"Even strong domestic wine is better". Better than what?

 

natalia

Hall of Fame
Most notably in the blend used for Champagne, but he did write that he is interested in red wines.

Yes, he did write so - still, red wines can be (and are) made from blend of grape varieties.
Ex.: Ronco di Sassi is a blend of Primitivo, Aglianico and Montepulciano. I love it but doesn’t mean that I love each and every wine made from Primitivo. SeewhatImean?

p.s. Same with Bordeaux wine - it’s a blend.
 

Soul

Semi-Pro
The cheapest kind! I buy by the gallon. :giggle:

I am invited to a wine party tonight. Some highly expensive wines will be served. The host is from Asia originally and I guess such wine gatherings are typical there. The pricy wine doesn't do much for me. I guess it can be tasty but not all that different from what I drink.
 

Sudacafan

Talk Tennis Guru
Yes, he did write so - still, red wines can be (and are) made from blend of grape varieties.
Ex.: Ronco di Sassi is a blend of Primitivo, Aglianico and Montepulciano. I love it but doesn’t mean that I love each and every wine made from Primitivo. SeewhatImean?

p.s. Same with Bordeaux wine - it’s a blend.
A specific blend can be the favorite. But there‘s only 10 choices available in the poll.
I could have put Blend (specify) as an option.
Many wine drinkers prefer assemblages to an only grape variety.
 

Sudacafan

Talk Tennis Guru
The cheapest kind! I buy by the gallon. :giggle:

I am invited to a wine party tonight. Some highly expensive wines will be served. The host is from Asia originally and I guess such wine gatherings are typical there. The pricy wine doesn't do much for me. I guess it can be tasty but not all that different from what I drink.
Let’s make a deal. I send you 10 gallons of that kind of wine you drink, and you transfer to me your invitation to that wine party.
 

Soul

Semi-Pro
Let’s make a deal. I send you 10 gallons of that kind of wine you drink, and you transfer to me your invitation to that wine party.
You could have taken my place tonight! I didn't make it. I keep thinking I should go to one of the tasting events again in the future. Any more I tend to pass though the invite is given. I'd bring a tasty bottle of blueberry wine 2019. They'd have a good laugh at it I'm sure.
 

Tennis_Hands

Bionic Poster
Yes, he did write so - still, red wines can be (and are) made from blend of grape varieties.
Ex.: Ronco di Sassi is a blend of Primitivo, Aglianico and Montepulciano. I love it but doesn’t mean that I love each and every wine made from Primitivo. SeewhatImean?

p.s. Same with Bordeaux wine - it’s a blend.
I am not sure that I follow. Your remark was a response to his comment that those are red wine varieties. While your comment that white wines can also be produced from those grapes was correct there is no denying that those are primarily red wine varieties, and as such can be used as benchmarks for red wines, considering that the varietal wines have established themselves, especially in the places where he comes from.

While I get your twist, which is that grapes and wines are not always synonymous, your point that white wines can be made from red grape varieties didn't directly lead to the idea that you are talking about blends.

If we are to be pedantic what you say is equally incorrect. A wine from Bordeaux can be a single grape variety wine, even if the majority of the Bordeaux wines are indeed blends.

 

natalia

Hall of Fame
I am not sure that I follow. Your remark was a response to his comment that those are red wine varieties. While your comment that white wines can also be produced from those grapes was correct there is no denying that those are primarily red wine varieties, and as such can be used as benchmarks for red wines, considering that the varietal wines have established themselves, especially in the places where he comes from.

While I get your twist, which is that grapes and wines are not always synonymous, your point that white wines can be made from red grape varieties didn't directly lead to the idea that you are talking about blends.

If we are to be pedantic what you say is equally incorrect. A wine from Bordeaux can be a single grape variety wine, even if the majority of the Bordeaux wines are indeed blends.

Ahmmmmmmm..... just for the record : I am always right. :cool:

Seriously : I don’t know where Sudacafan comes from, sorry. But I sure know that he is a gentleman and kindly got my points (both) - so let’s drink to that!
 

Zara

Legend
Ahmmmmmmm..... just for the record : I am always right. :cool:

Seriously : I don’t know where Sudacafan comes from, sorry. But I sure know that he is a gentleman and kindly got my points (both) - so let’s drink to that!
Columbia!
 

Sudacafan

Talk Tennis Guru
Ahmmmmmmm..... just for the record : I am always right. :cool:

Seriously : I don’t know where Sudacafan comes from, sorry. But I sure know that he is a gentleman and kindly got my points (both) - so let’s drink to that!
Thinking about what I highlighted above, were you born in Argentina, same as me?
 
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