Which machine would you buy?

taydbear7

Semi-Pro
I'm thinking about purchasing my first stringing machine. The follow is what is available locally. I don't want to spend much since I don't have any idea what is good or bad.

Eagnas Model Flex 940 $400
Eagnas EAG 700 $400
Prince $500
Gamm Progression II 602 FC $565
Gamma 6000 $700
 

hadoken

Semi-Pro
For sure I would pick the Prince assuming it's in good shape and it's the NEOS and not the old pneumatic machines like the P200. If it was the P200 then I would pass and get the EAG 700. The difference in the Eagnas models is glide bar vs swivel clamp. I don't like stringing on swivel clamps...they are just slower vs the glide bar system. For most tennis players, the glide bar works fine....the argument against glide bar is you can't string fan based tennis patterns but who cares, nobody really uses those frames.

The Gamma 6000 is also a glide bar system which I would prefer over Eagnas...but not for $700 vs $400. That machine is old. If you could get it for $400-$500 assuming it's in good shape I would take that one instead.
 

taydbear7

Semi-Pro
Most likely the Prince, under the assumption that it's a Neos, and it's fully functional. If it's something like the P200, then that changes things.
For sure I would pick the Prince assuming it's in good shape and it's the NEOS and not the old pneumatic machines like the P200. If it was the P200 then I would pass and get the EAG 700. The difference in the Eagnas models is glide bar vs swivel clamp. I don't like stringing on swivel clamps...they are just slower vs the glide bar system. For most tennis players, the glide bar works fine....the argument against glide bar is you can't string fan based tennis patterns but who cares, nobody really uses those frames.

The Gamma 6000 is also a glide bar system which I would prefer over Eagnas...but not for $700 vs $400. That machine is old. If you could get it for $400-$500 assuming it's in good shape I would take that one instead.
I got more information. It's the NEOS 1000
 

hadoken

Semi-Pro
Go down, check it out and see if he can do $450 if not then pay the $500. No point quibbling over a good price. Where do you live where so many used stringers are around???
 
  • Like
Reactions: max

hadoken

Semi-Pro
I am assuming the mounting clamps are included but not shown on the picture. So long as the owner can show you a frame mounted, then I think $400-$500 is fair. The light rust is pretty common on these machines and doesn't affect use. The tension head cover is a cosmetic item...not needed.
 

taydbear7

Semi-Pro
There was 3 photos uploaded. Not sure if you guys saw all of them. If you saw all 3 and the machine is missing a item or two please let me know
 

MAX PLY

Hall of Fame
Another vote for Prince--anything between 400-500 should be ok assuming tension head works--you can also buy a replacement tension head cover if there's not one (and I would do so) (and I wonder why so many used machines seem to be missing that??). Bottom line, some elbow grease and a few bucks for some replacement parts and you have a great machine for less than $600. Easy call. Good luck.
 

taydbear7

Semi-Pro
Great tip! I'm going to try it. Seller hasn't responded back yet. I'm going to get a buddy of mine to come with him and have him string it right there to test the machine whenever I can get a hold of the seller.
 

struggle

Legend
Buy it. It's worth the asking price, but i'd STILL do my best to get it as low as possible, because
that's what anyone should do.

Good luck with your new machine.

Post pics of it sitting YOUR home!! :)
 

graycrait

Hall of Fame
Reading this thread I had this thought. If I were selling my fully functioning and outfitted NEOS 1000 for the bargain basement price of 500 bucks and a prospective buyer offered me 400 or 450 I would tell them goodbye and good luck. Something happened just like this sale recently to me. I offered a more than fair price for a "cult" canoe. The buyer, who had obviously done his homework, listened to my price, stood there a minute, then peeled off of a large roll of money a number of 100 dollar bills meeting my fair price. I used that money to buy my Wise 2086. Two honorable people treating each other with respect.

I like to treat decent people decently, not like they are some thief at a flea market bazaar of obviously stolen items.
 
Last edited:

struggle

Legend
Reading this thread I had this thought. If I were selling my fully functioning and outfitted NEOS 1000 for the bargain basement price of 500 bucks and a prospective buyer offered me 400 or 450 I would tell then goodbye and good luck. Something happened just like this sale recently to me. I offered a more than fair price for a "cult" canoe. The buyer, who had obviously done his homework, listened to my price, stood there a minute, then peeled off of a large roll of money a number of 100 dollar bills meeting my fair price. I used that money to buy my Wise 2086. Two honorable people treating each other with respect.

I like to treat decent people decently, not like they are some thief at a flea market bazaar of obviously stolen items.
so if he had offered you less, you'd have told him to go pound sand?

Or would you have just said, "no, my price is firm" and taken his money after he tried, AS HE SHOULD, to get a deal?

No one even pays sticker for a brand new car....

Do the best you can. I'd laugh at anyone who doesn't....even selling my own stuff. Everyone offers things knowing they'll
likely have to take less.
 

graycrait

Hall of Fame
so if he had offered you less, you'd have told him to go pound sand?
Depending on the situation I would have told him essentially that. I treat honorable people honorably and expect the same in return. I do understand cultural variations better than most so that would have been a consideration. However, all of us knowing the "value" of a fully functioning and outfitted NEOS 1000 in the current market climate and trying to employ "The Art of the Deal" seems hardly appropriate in this case. We are tennis players not carny barkers.
 

struggle

Legend
By this logic he should just hand the guy $700.

At any rate, we all seem to agree that the machine is worth the $500 but
most also agree that any item should be obtained for the best price possible.

Car enthusiasts do the same thing, get the best deal they can.

Cheers. I hope he gets the machine and enjoys it thoroughly no matter the price.
 

taydbear7

Semi-Pro
Hey guys, just an update. I went there to take a look at the machine and it looks good though it could use some cleaning up. It looks like it's been sitting in the garage for some time. It has all the necessary parts and he was going to throw in a Babolat synthetic gut reel (missing probably 2-3 sets). Anyways asked him all the necessary questions and then the last questions I asked was if he would take $400 and he said yes! So I got the machine. I'll post pictures soon as I need to clear up some space in sun room. Thanks for the tips guys! I'm stoked and now I have to watch some video on how to string a racquet.
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
@struggle - I'm usually really bad about selling low (ask @loosegroove ) and buying for asked price. My wife has tried to teach me the art of bargaining, but I'm not a very good student it seems. I think @taydbear7 did a great job, you never know if the seller asked high and was willing or that was his best price. So it never hurts to ask.
 
  • Like
Reactions: esm

struggle

Legend
@struggle - I'm usually really bad about selling low (ask @loosegroove ) and buying for asked price. My wife has tried to teach me the art of bargaining, but I'm not a very good student it seems. I think @taydbear7 did a great job, you never know if the seller asked high and was willing or that was his best price. So it never hurts to ask.
I think it's always best to go with the max amount (cash in hand) you are willing to pay, but also never hurts to ask (bargain).
Most folks selling used items build in some buffer and are expecting to take less. Otherwise they'll state "price is firm".

$400 is a fair price, as is $500. The seller likely got every ounce of his investment in use of the machine over the years and
selling it was just "gravy on top", so to speak.
 
First of all check out the item. If it is better condition that you thought and it is fully functional, then don't hesitate to start with a good offer.
For 500 asking price, 400 is good offer. It is not low ball offer. Low ball would be ~200!
Post some photo once you are done cleaning.
Congrats!
 

Wes

Professional
I think it's always best to go with the max amount (cash in hand) you are willing to pay, but also never hurts to ask (bargain).
Most folks selling used items build in some buffer and are expecting to take less. Otherwise they'll state "price is firm".
Absolutely agree 100%.

$400 is a fair price, as is $500. The seller likely got every ounce of his investment in use of the machine over the years and
selling it was just "gravy on top", so to speak.
Likely correct as well. ;)
 

loosegroove

Hall of Fame
@struggle - I'm usually really bad about selling low (ask @loosegroove ) and buying for asked price. My wife has tried to teach me the art of bargaining, but I'm not a very good student it seems. I think @taydbear7 did a great job, you never know if the seller asked high and was willing or that was his best price. So it never hurts to ask.
Well at least you sold low on your own accord, and I didn't weasel you down, which is how I normally roll ;)
 
Last edited:
Top