"White Glove" stringing service

eelhc

Hall of Fame
I only string for family and friends. I keep a good mix of poly, multi, SG in stock and can usually find a good fit for my"clients". if they have a specific string that i don't have, they'll bring it to me.

I don't charge for strings/service unless it's natural gut or another expensive multi in which case I'll just ask them to pay for the strings. What I do ask for is a 6 pack of craft beer or a bottle of table wine that costs no more than $15 (incl tax and deposit). I find this is a good balance of not charging friends but not making them feel like they "owe" something. That way they can save a few dollars and I can continue to enjoy my hobby and feed my bad habits.

Now that all said... So I can provide the utmost quality of service to my "clients", here's what I do in addition to just stringing (all of which adds maybe ~10-15 min max to the string job, most/all of which I think a good quality shop provides):
  • Check to see if there's something obviously wrong with the setup (guy wearing an elbow brace wants a full poly job on an 18x20, stiff frame at high tension so he can go another year before stringing... I've actually had that happen).
  • Frame structural integrity and grommet condition checked with the "client" before starting.
  • Racquet weighed and balance checked before and after.
  • Ratty, peeling lead tape if any replaced.
  • Once the strings are off, the frame is cleaned and the grime is removed from head to buttcap.
  • Paint is touched up with sharpies, white out, nail polish, etc...
  • A little plastic restore rubbed on the bumper guard.
  • A new overgrip is installed. Dry or tacky depending on what was on the racquet. If the overgrip that's not on the racquet is in good shape, I'll just include one.
  • Label placed on the inside of throat with stringing date, strings (M/X) and tension, weight and balance.
Priority One has nothing to worry about... but since I do get enjoyment out of my hobby, what else could I be doing?

While I do racquet matching for myself/immediate family, I'm not quite there yet on offering it as a service (most folks don't really care)... maybe after I retire from my day job.
 

Kot_Bigemot

Professional
Who pays for lead tape, overgrips, labels?
I mean it is very nice of you but, in my opinion you need to break even at least.
I provide all those services, and every racket is placed in a clear plastic bag with my logo on it. But I charge for overgrips, lead tape, strings and labor.

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eelhc

Hall of Fame
Who pays for lead tape, overgrips, labels?
I mean it is very nice of you but, in my opinion you need to break even at least.
I provide all those services, and every racket is placed in a clear plastic bag with my logo on it. But I charge for overgrips, lead tape, strings and labor.

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I pay for all materials unless it's a really expensive string. I am not a commercial stringer so I don't need to break even. I string maybe 2~4 racquets a month for folks outside my immediate family.

Labels cost almost nothing (I have a WiFi Brother thermal label printer), Overgrips I buy in bulk (Tourna or Wilson Pro, ~$1.25 each), A lifetime supply of lead tape is like what... $20? Balance that with the beer and wine I get in payment, I'm probably breaking even but that's really not the point.
 

Kot_Bigemot

Professional
I pay for all materials unless it's a really expensive string. I am not a commercial stringer so I don't need to break even. I string maybe 2~4 racquets a month for folks outside my immediate family.

Labels cost almost nothing (I have a WiFi Brother thermal label printer), Overgrips I buy in bulk (Tourna or Wilson Pro, ~$1.25 each), A lifetime supply of lead tape is like what... $20? Balance that with the beer and wine I get in payment, I'm probably breaking even but that's really not the point.
Hey, as long as you are happy :)
It certainly is a nice thing to do for friends.

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chrisingrassia

Professional
....I'm probably breaking even but that's really not the point.
What is the point of this post then?

Checking frame condition and grommets/guards, adding a stringing label is not "white glove" service IMO. Cleaning "grime" off a racquet? What racquets have "grime"? And is "cleaning the racquet" different from "removing the grime"?
In my 2000+ racquets I've done over the years, not one has asked me the balance and weight. Nor needed it documented on a label somewhere. Isn't that usually printed directly on the frame already?

Perhaps just me, but none of that is "white glove".
 

Kot_Bigemot

Professional
I would have to agree about White glove. You are providing typical service any good pro shop would provide. At least in my area. I for example go even further. We pickup and deliver within 25 miles. People love it. All they do is put rackets outside on porch and find it all done within a day or two.

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eelhc

Hall of Fame
What is the point of this post then?

Checking frame condition and grommets/guards, adding a stringing label is not "white glove" service IMO. Cleaning "grime" off a racquet? What racquets have "grime"? And is "cleaning the racquet" different from "removing the grime"?
In my 2000+ racquets I've done over the years, not one has asked me the balance and weight. Nor needed it documented on a label somewhere. Isn't that usually printed directly on the frame already?

Perhaps just me, but none of that is "white glove".
The point is... I am trying to provide better service. I've done what I can do learn from the best practices of other stringers. You may not consider any of this "white glove" but it's certainly better than most $5/string job Craigslist guys.

Maybe grime is not the right word... but I'm sure you've seen frames with tape residue, some layers of caked on hartru/red clay and dirt/dust.
I check the weight an balance before and after... If I replace lead tape that's banged up/peeling, I make sure I return it with same/close to original specs. I document it just because I can.
 

chrisingrassia

Professional
The point is... I am trying to provide better service.
I don't want to not have a suggestion. So my suggestion is to string wearing white gloves. No exceptions.

I've done what I can do learn from the best practices of other stringers. You may not consider any of this "white glove" but it's certainly better than most $5/string job Craigslist guys.
You don't need to be white-glove to separate yourself from a $5 stringer. Does a $5 stringer actually exist? If you're doing it all for free though....then technically you're a $0 stringer :)

Maybe grime is not the right word... but I'm sure you've seen frames with tape residue, some layers of caked on hartru/red clay and dirt/dust. I check the weight an balance before and after... If I replace lead tape that's banged up/peeling, I make sure I return it with same/close to original specs. I document it just because I can.
I'm in CA so it's true you may have different court surfaces than we have out here. I've not strung anything with grime. Some lead tape residue is quickly cleaned up with rubbing alcohol. I do the same grime clean-up I suppose when I remove an old stringing label in the throat.

Unless you're truly into the market of racquet customization, there's really nothing white glove about stringing a racquet and replacing an overgrip. No offense.
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
Great idea! Now where the heck did I put the food vacuum system? :D [Why the f**king H*** would I want to provide a plastic bag? It's unneeded and polluting!]

What OP is providing is basic stuff. I receive frames from friends and clients after playing. I do all the checks before I accept the frame because it does me no good to string a cracked frame or ones with bad bumper/grommets. Discuss string (mine or theirs), tension and they will get the frames back strung, clean, deodorized, wiped down with alcohol for germs on an agreed date, normally next time I see them (~2 days or less.) Only time there are problems is if their strings break or I can't find grommets for a reasonable price or I can't fix a grommet hole. 3 cents. [Oh, I don't do racquetball frames and any frames where the throat needs special support like Head's stupid Air Bow.]
 

dak95_00

Hall of Fame
I only string for family and friends. I keep a good mix of poly, multi, SG in stock and can usually find a good fit for my"clients". if they have a specific string that i don't have, they'll bring it to me.

I don't charge for strings/service unless it's natural gut or another expensive multi in which case I'll just ask them to pay for the strings. What I do ask for is a 6 pack of craft beer or a bottle of table wine that costs no more than $15 (incl tax and deposit). I find this is a good balance of not charging friends but not making them feel like they "owe" something. That way they can save a few dollars and I can continue to enjoy my hobby and feed my bad habits.

Now that all said... So I can provide the utmost quality of service to my "clients", here's what I do in addition to just stringing (all of which adds maybe ~10-15 min max to the string job, most/all of which I think a good quality shop provides):
  • Check to see if there's something obviously wrong with the setup (guy wearing an elbow brace wants a full poly job on an 18x20, stiff frame at high tension so he can go another year before stringing... I've actually had that happen).
  • Frame structural integrity and grommet condition checked with the "client" before starting.
  • Racquet weighed and balance checked before and after.
  • Ratty, peeling lead tape if any replaced.
  • Once the strings are off, the frame is cleaned and the grime is removed from head to buttcap.
  • Paint is touched up with sharpies, white out, nail polish, etc...
  • A little plastic restore rubbed on the bumper guard.
  • A new overgrip is installed. Dry or tacky depending on what was on the racquet. If the overgrip that's not on the racquet is in good shape, I'll just include one.
  • Label placed on the inside of throat with stringing date, strings (M/X) and tension, weight and balance.
Priority One has nothing to worry about... but since I do get enjoyment out of my hobby, what else could I be doing?

While I do racquet matching for myself/immediate family, I'm not quite there yet on offering it as a service (most folks don't really care)... maybe after I retire from my day job.
What kind of public service job do you do to actually pay the bills? I'm guessing you're a school teacher because they're known for providing tons of extra work for free without any acknowledgement.
 

eelhc

Hall of Fame
What kind of public service job do you do to actually pay the bills? I'm guessing you're a school teacher because they're known for providing tons of extra work for free without any acknowledgement.
Can't complain... life's pretty good. MS in Electrical and Computer Engineering. 25+ years experience. Presently in middle management in decent sized IT company. Wife has an post grad degree as well and has a similar level job in a different industry. We both work hard and do well for ourselves. Both got advanced degrees paid for by our first employers. Both had good parents who valued hard work and education. Passing it on to the kids. Wash, rinse, repeat.

Sitting in front of a computer screen, attending meetings and conference calls all day, working with my hands is a nice diversion. If I get a little more time, I might get serious about woodworking.

We all have a part to play. Every profession that produces something useful or beautiful are important. Teachers are important but please... don't buy into that BS and canonize the profession.

Teachers happen to have a 9 month work year, get paid extra to work a full day (coach sports, run clubs, etc), and in many places are protected by Union contracts. That said, I don't care... good teachers who produce results deserve to get paid exceptionally and bad ones deserve to be fired... not the case in my school district.

Getting back OT... I do all of this for beer/wine. Given that I'm doing pretty well and string for the enjoyment of it, I don't charge friends for doing a favor... but that may make the friend uncomfortable so a good compromise is a 6 pack of craft beer or decent table wine. This also goes for other work I do... AV/Home theater and Home networking setup (install TV's, speakers, WiFi access points... fish AV and Network cables behind sheetrock...).
 
Why ... would I want to provide a plastic bag? It's unneeded and polluting
I agree. IMO, there is absolutely no need to provide plastic bags (clear or otherwise) for this type of service. The oceans and most life in them is slowly being destroyed by plastic bags.

Few things fluster me, but I must admit my blood boils everytime I see one of the Pro players take a out a freshly strung racquet wrapped in plastic and garner help from the Ball Person to remove it. I really hope those bags are being recycled.

If the player wanting the restring doesn't provide you with a bag don't complicate the process.
 

milk of amnesia

Hall of Fame
I'm sure your friends really appreciate your conscientious effort to be the best stringer possible.
In that vein, I offer the following suggestions:
  1. If you're not being paid in Anchor Steam, you're doing it wrong.
  2. I agree with those suggesting you should ditch the plastic bags.
  3. I sincerely hope that you get permission from your friends before providing additional "services" to their racquets; i.e., If you were to ever slather my racquet with fingernail polish, tape maintenance labels on my racquet, or deface it in any other way, I'd spit in that beer before handing it off to you.
  4. If they bring in their own strings, you could explain the benefits of, and offer to pre-stretch their strings for them.
  5. The suggestion above of picking up and dropping off racquets is a good one - kind of old-fashioned, like the milkman.
  6. Ask your friends if there is anything else you can do for them.
Happy stringing.
 
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eelhc

Hall of Fame
I'm sure your friends really appreciate your conscientious effort to be the best stringer possible.
In that vein, I offer the following suggestions:
  1. If you're not being paid in Anchor Steam, you're doing it wrong.
  2. I agree with those suggesting you should ditch the plastic bags.
  3. I sincerely hope that you get permission from your friends before providing additional "services" to their racquets; i.e., If you were to ever slather my racquet with fingernail polish, tape maintenance labels on my racquet, or deface it in any other way, I'd spit in that beer before handing it off to you.
  4. If they bring in their own strings, you could explain the benefits of, and offer to pre-stretch their strings for them.
  5. The suggestion above of picking up and dropping off racquets is a good one - kind of old-fashioned, like the milkman.
  6. Ask your friends if there is anything else you can do for them.
Happy stringing.
I actually got Anchor Steam once. Good stuff but I'm more of a hop head Love to get some Pliny the younger but that's probably not very likely. I did get some Tree House Julius (great stuff but the hype is a bit overblown). My go to IPA is still Heady Topper which is easier to come by in the Northeast since they opened their new place.

I'm no tree hugger but I agree that plastic bags that cover the racquet once and get recycled (or worse, end up in a landfill) are not necessary.

I do ask before touch up. Nail polish is only used on small paint chips which if left alone, could get bigger. For larger areas and scrapes (which the paint is feathered to the base coat) I use a sharpie. Not much you can do for exposed graphite.

I also dab a bit of clear nail polish on the knot tails of gut and multi strings so they don't fray. Gut stringbeds get a light coat of paraffin wax (unscented candle) as well.

Pickup and drop is usually not necessary since most of these folks, I see on a regular basis.

I do a light pre-stretch to remove the coil memory on most strings. Going any further depends on the string type and what the client wants.

~2/3 of the people I string for fall into the "string it once a year weather needed or not" category. Once in a while, I get the guy who brings me a racquet the night before an important match because "fresh strings play better"... even though he's been practicing with the "old" strings for the entire week. So sometimes, the "service" is talking the person out of re-stringing.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
  1. I sincerely hope that you get permission from your friends before providing additional "services" to their racquets; i.e., If you were to ever slather my racquet with fingernail polish, tape maintenance labels on my racquet, or deface it in any other way, I'd spit in that beer before handing it off to you.
I recognize and respect that some customers do not want a label affixed to their racquet. But, here's my perspective, stringing in a retail shop: Affixing a label with how and when your racquet was strung, is part of our process. If you don't like the label, feel free to remove it. BUT, know that in doing so, I may or may not be able to recreate your last string job, if you bring your racquet back to be restrung the same way as last time (the label having been removed). I will take a quick look in the spreadsheet to see if I can find the details of your last job. But I'm not going to spend an exorbitant amount of time, just because you don't want a label on your racquet. Savvy?
 
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eelhc

Hall of Fame
I recognize and respect that some customers do not want a label affixed to their racquet. But, here's my perspective, stringing in a retail shop: Affixing a label with how and when your racquet was strung l, is part of our process. If you don't like the label, feel free to remove it. BUT, know that in doing so, I may or may not be able to recreate your last string job, if you bring your racquet back to be restrung the same way as last time (the label having been removed). I will take a quick look in the spreadsheet to see if I can find the details of your last job. But I'm not going to spend an exorbitant amount of time, just because you don't want a label on your racquet. Savvy?
But milk of amnesia is the type of guy who would spit in a friend's beer for putting a label on his racquet. I don't have friends like that so no worries for me.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
But milk of amnesia is the type of guy who would spit in a friend's beer for putting a label on his racquet. I don't have friends like that so no worries for me.
You assume you don't have friends like that...but how do you know? (I kid, of course). ;)

Seriously though...I can't comprehend why people get so incensed by a little inconspicuous label on the throat of their racquet. Remove the label, or take your racquets to someone else who doesn't use labels. No sense in wasting perfectly good spit, IMO.
 

milk of amnesia

Hall of Fame
You assume you don't have friends like that...but how do you know? (I kid, of course). ;)

Seriously though...I can't comprehend why people get so incensed by a little inconspicuous label on the throat of their racquet. Remove the label, or take your racquets to someone else who doesn't use labels. No sense in wasting perfectly good spit, IMO.
Because in addition to finger nail polish, magic marker, or god forbid - paraffin wax, I also don't want gummy residue on my racquet. This, however...

"...~2/3 of the people I string for fall into the "string it once a year weather needed or not" category."
explains a lot. If the OP started out with this info, I wouldn't have bothered to comment.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Most people I String for want labels. And if there is only one date on the label they want to know the date it was strung not when it needs to be restrung. I've had people complain about the print wearing off. Nothing I can do about that after a year or two.
 

jim e

Legend
Most people I String for want labels. And if there is only one date on the label they want to know the date it was strung not when it needs to be restrung. I've had people complain about the print wearing off. Nothing I can do about that after a year or two.
most I string for as well like labels.
The ones I use are from the USRSA and they have a clear cover applied once you write on them, so writing stays for a while.
If someone does not like them , they peal right off, so no big deal.
 

Kot_Bigemot

Professional
Most people I String for want labels. And if there is only one date on the label they want to know the date it was strung not when it needs to be restrung. I've had people complain about the print wearing off. Nothing I can do about that after a year or two.
I use Brother P-Touch. And use white print on black tape. In many cases people do not even notice it. Because it blends in with black throats. And also, many actually ask me if I put a label on because they want reference to strings and tension. And my contact info as well.
I had few calls saying that they have racket with my label on it and asking questions. And I am able to pull records from that label.
So, labels are convenient for me and for customers.


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chrisingrassia

Professional
I recognize and respect that some customers do not want a label affixed to their racquet. But, here's my perspective, stringing in a retail shop: Affixing a label with how and when your racquet was strung, is part of our process. If you don't like the label, feel free to remove it. BUT, know that in doing so, I may or may not be able to recreate your last string job, if you bring your racquet back to be restrung the same way as last time (the label having been removed). I will take a quick look in the spreadsheet to see if I can find the details of your last job. But I'm not going to spend an exorbitant amount of time, just because you don't want a label on your racquet. Savvy?
If any of my clients tell me they don't want a label I don't string for them anymore. It's a service to not just me, but to other stringers as well. What if my client goes away to a tournament or travels and the onsite stringer needs to know what I did for them? Boom.
I'm only 32, but I literally have zero patience anymore with pretension and superficiality.
 

eelhc

Hall of Fame
You assume you don't have friends like that...but how do you know? (I kid, of course). ;)

Seriously though...I can't comprehend why people get so incensed by a little inconspicuous label on the throat of their racquet. Remove the label, or take your racquets to someone else who doesn't use labels. No sense in wasting perfectly good spit, IMO.
milk of amnesia must really freak out on those oil change places that place a label on the windshield... If a label (easily peeled off with no residue) upsets him on a $200 racquet, can you imagine a label (easily peeled off with some residue) on a $30K+ car? Whoa!!

And what's wrong with string it once a year crowd? Are we all inadequate because we don't get 6 frames all restrung overnight weather used or not like the pros?
 

rchjr2091

Semi-Pro
I would have to agree about White glove. You are providing typical service any good pro shop would provide. At least in my area. I for example go even further. We pickup and deliver within 25 miles. People love it. All they do is put rackets outside on porch and find it all done within a day or two.

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Pick up and deliver service? I would have probably never bought a stringer if that was available in my area.
It wasn't the money I spent on getting my racquet strung, it was the time it took driving to and from the shop that I hated. You have some lucky customers.
 

Kot_Bigemot

Professional
Pick up and deliver service? I would have probably never bought a stringer if that was available in my area.
It wasn't the money I spent on getting my racquet strung, it was the time it took driving to and from the shop that I hated. You have some lucky customers.
We sell convenience along with quality :)
In order to stay on top one has to offer something nobody else does.
And really it cost very little. We setup 7-8 pickups in the area and that pays for gas. People gladly pay $2-3 more just to not have to drive to the shop.
And that is why we are rated #1 for past 4 years in our area :)

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esgee48

G.O.A.T.
Labels are a hassle, but a necessity. Date strung, tension and string name* on a printed small discreet label, which can be easily removed with 91% alcohol. The labels that come in single packs leave residue, so I stopped using them a long time ago.

* Even knowing tension and string, you will get variations in DT because machine and stringing techniques differ. But it's better to know than not know.
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
I don't do labels. I keep a spreadsheet of all the restrings. I can easily filter by name and tell the player upon request when their last restring was, tension, and string. With mobile phones and text, it's just too easy to keep it online. I also save the spreadsheet to the cloud so it is accessible from my mobile.
 

Herb

Semi-Pro
I don't do labels. I keep a spreadsheet of all the restrings. I can easily filter by name and tell the player upon request when their last restring was, tension, and string. With mobile phones and text, it's just too easy to keep it online. I also save the spreadsheet to the cloud so it is accessible from my mobile.
same thing here. I have a spreadsheet stored on dropbox that I can access from anywhere.
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
I keep a spreadsheet too, but some of my clients have many more frames than 1 or 2. Just looking up by latest date by whatever is not good if the frame is one of the older ones. They don't break strings in the order they are strung. :p

And then I frequently get frames with no labels and the user has no idea what string and tension is in it. I can tell if it is SG, multi or poly; but have no idea what tension.
 

Kot_Bigemot

Professional
I have many guys that have 4 to 6 rackets. And every racket strung with slightly different tension. So, I must have labels.
I use Brother P-Touch. Very convenient little USB printer. Attached to computer, I can load files from my database. And labels are plastic with protective clear film over. So they stay on and no writing is affected by time

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Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
@Kot_Bigemot good point. I have a few customers that have 3 or more similar frames but only have one strung at a time. They only switch to another racket when at the beginning of a tournament or when a string breaks. That way they always 1 or more back ups with no play.

One of my customers had all his rackets break in a tournament once and started that because he would alternate all the time. Rather than stringing all his rackets once a month now he strings 1 racket 4 times a month. Made sense to me.

If you're keeping a spreadsheet all you're really doing is keeping up with the tension and string. How does the player know when it was strung last?
 

Kot_Bigemot

Professional
@Kot_Bigemot good point. I have a few customers that have 3 or more similar frames but only have one strung at a time. They only switch to another racket when at the beginning of a tournament or when a string breaks. That way they always 1 or more back ups with no play.

One of my customers had all his rackets break in a tournament once and started that because he would alternate all the time. Rather than stringing all his rackets once a month now he strings 1 racket 4 times a month. Made sense to me.

If you're keeping a spreadsheet all you're really doing is keeping up with the tension and string. How does the player know when it was strung last?
Well, in my case, many college students. As you guys know, we have biggest concentration of colleges, schools etc here in Boston :)
So, many have say, 6 rackets strung with different tension. They rotate them during practice, tournaments.
Many other customers have 2-3 rackets strung with same tension, customized to have same specs etc.
I do keep a large database. When I enter name, full history of dates, tensions, notes, any customization work done comes up from day one. And I can automatically print labels for current string job.
This setup cost me few bucks to design and to be installed by a professional programmer. But it is worth it.
 

Dags

Hall of Fame
What serial numbers?
The vast majority of racquets (I want to say all, but there's bound to be an exception) have a unique serial number. Most of them are on a small hologramatic label in the throat. Head always used to have them on the buttcap instead. I include this information in my spreadsheet because as has been pointed out, it's a way of distinguishing between multiple racquets of the same model. It's certainly not foolproof though... I guess some people don't like having *any* label on their racquet, because I get some with it removed.
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
I keep a spreadsheet too, but some of my clients have many more frames than 1 or 2. Just looking up by latest date by whatever is not good if the frame is one of the older ones. They don't break strings in the order they are strung. :p

And then I frequently get frames with no labels and the user has no idea what string and tension is in it. I can tell if it is SG, multi or poly; but have no idea what tension.
Which stringer are you using?
 

vrx46

New User
Hell yeah.. I am similar with my business.. Cliental you keep real small, just people looking for that professional quality service.. Presentation is everything, i like that you clean up the racquet as well. it makes the customer come back! I also replace overgrips, mainly because i dont wanna touch somebody elses sweat.. It also completes the job, putting on fresh string, nice stencil, shock absorber.. In a plastic bag with a label dated.. Every time i get a "wow" prices are simple with me as well..racket tune ups.. 20$ or a hybrid for 25$ Keep up your methods, dont let people hate your good work
 

Kot_Bigemot

Professional
Hell yeah.. I am similar with my business.. Cliental you keep real small, just people looking for that professional quality service.. Presentation is everything, i like that you clean up the racquet as well. it makes the customer come back! I also replace overgrips, mainly because i dont wanna touch somebody elses sweat.. It also completes the job, putting on fresh string, nice stencil, shock absorber.. In a plastic bag with a label dated.. Every time i get a "wow" prices are simple with me as well..racket tune ups.. 20$ or a hybrid for 25$ Keep up your methods, dont let people hate your good work
So, why keep clientele small? Can not handle it? If clientele real small, then what is the point? I do everything OP mentioned and then some and have about 200-250 regulars :)
As for overgrips and shock absorbers. Who pays for those? I can see label, plastic bag to protect against elements. But, about 80% of my customers insist that i do not use stencil.
 

lwto

Hall of Fame
I would have to agree about White glove. You are providing typical service any good pro shop would provide. At least in my area. I for example go even further. We pickup and deliver within 25 miles. People love it. All they do is put rackets outside on porch and find it all done within a day or two.

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I have people shipping me racquets USPS priority.
 

gdeangel

Rookie
Back to the OP -- white glove to me would mean mostly cosmetics. Some cosmetic things:
  1. making a custom stencil for your customer -- they want their initials monogrammed like RF, you play artist for a day
  2. vinyl tape over the lead tape, in the same color as the frame, and cutout to go over the grommets so it doesn't fall off and doesn't show where the weight is unless you do a really up close exam...
  3. supply string in specific colors the customer wants, not just the type (doesn't apply if they are providing the strings). If they ask for a string in a color that doesn't exist, you know it and can tell them on the spot, and can supply an "equivalent" string in the colors they want
These are things your average player looking for a functional job won't give 2c about, but stuff that trust-fund types who make their butler wear white gloves would give you props for.

I think picking up and delivering the racquet definitely counts for "white glove" points also, as would stringing on site.
 
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