Who do you rank higher between Pancho Gonzalez? Ken Rosewall? Novak Djokovic

Greater Player between 3: Nole, Gonzalez, Rosewall


  • Total voters
    64

Ivan69

Hall of Fame
Tilden is tough to rate because he played in the transitional period of tennis from hobbyism to professional attitude, himself being the flagship of the change. For that reason, you shouldn't take his records almost at face value like we do with the 50s-60s pros, but neither largely discount them like Renshaw's 7 Wimbledons pre-WWI.
Hobbyism?!?!? Understandable. Many people have no idea what happened 50-100 years ago.
 

Luka888

Hall of Fame
I refuse to compare players from different eras and I find it beyond silly. Everything was so different, court, racquets. Pro and amateur tour. Complete mess.

If I have to decide who ... Well, it's Djokovic and it's not even close.
 
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Hobbyism?!?!? Understandable. Many people have no idea what happened 50-100 years ago.
For example, Wilding was a lawyer and apparently employed as such. Dunno if he actually worked, but one of the best players having even a nominal job elsewhere means the sport wasn't professional yet, with every player devoting their full attention to tennis and treating it as a job.
 

Tennisgods

Hall of Fame
I’ve read through most of the comments and i’ve seen nothing to change my mind; comparing across eras is a simple apples and oranges thing. Waste of time. Far too much has changed. And who knows what another 30 years of tennis will bring?

What you’re left with is greats from each era. Some eras have more than others.

We live in special times!
 

Ivan69

Hall of Fame
For example, Wilding was a lawyer and apparently employed as such. Dunno if he actually worked, but one of the best players having even a nominal job elsewhere means the sport wasn't professional yet, with every player devoting their full attention to tennis and treating it as a job.
Correct. Tony was a lawyer but I am not sure how much he worked as such. He played tennis for 14 years and for sure he would have played more if not killed in WW1. Great "hobby" was that when he won 126 titles. Wow!
Cosmic credit to such players who spent a lot of his time to win matches and titles for NO money.
 

Ivan69

Hall of Fame
I refuse to compare players from different eras and I find it beyond silly. Everything was so different, court, racquets. Pro and amateur tour. Complete mess.

If I have to decide who ... Well, it's Djokovic and it's not even close.
Exactly. Everything was so different. Just imagine you are playing with a wooden racquet, no medicine, no rehab, no physio, travelling 3 days per ship from the USA to Europe or vice versa, begging sponsors for financing the trip and the cheap motel (no hotel). Under all these circumstances the players were hard devoted to tennis. If you realise all that you will get a clearer picture.
 
Correct. Tony was a lawyer but I am not sure how much he worked as such. He played tennis for 14 years and for sure he would have played more if not killed in WW1. Great "hobby" was that when he won 126 titles. Wow!
Cosmic credit to such players who spent a lot of his time to win matches and titles for NO money.
I am reading Wilding was officially employed as a lawyer, which means tennis wasn't his job, hence hobbyism. Of course he's an ATG historically, but I wouldn't put him in any ranking because commitment is different. Tilden was the first ATG to be committed professionally, like when he spent the winter of '29 (iirc) doggedly working on his backhand. No coincidence that's when the pro tour was born (1927 to be precise, sure) and soon had most of the best amateurs joining starting with Tilden himself in 1931.
 

Ivan69

Hall of Fame
I am reading Wilding was officially employed as a lawyer, which means tennis wasn't his job, hence hobbyism. Of course he's an ATG historically, but I wouldn't put him in any ranking because commitment is different. Tilden was the first ATG to be committed professionally, like when he spent the winter of '29 (iirc) doggedly working on his backhand. No coincidence that's when the pro tour was born (1927 to be precise, sure) and soon had most of the best amateurs joining starting with Tilden himself in 1931.
Employed but where? In his father's law firm. His father was a very wealthy man. Tony may work or may not work.;) Tony may play tennis or may not. Tony may win 0 titles playing for joy and as a hobby or Tony may play hard and win 126 titles.
Tilden's story is very different and very sad. Not many amateurs join the pro tour after 1931. It was first Vines, years later Stoefen, later Perry and then Budge at the end of the 30s.
The first pro matches started in 1889. In 1890 the first pro tournament was played. 1927 is an old story.
 
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