Who is your favourite single-slam winner?

Pitti

Rookie
Among all of the players who only managed to win a single GS title (or have only won one so far) who’s your favourite and why?

I think my choice would be Juan Carlos Ferrero. I always enjoyed his style of play and technique. Although I’m not sure, since I also love Del Potro.
 

fundrazer

Legend
I think Gaudio for me. Goran provided a lot of entertainment value, but I find Gaudio relatable for some reason. Apparently he suffered from depression throughout parts of his career and that's something I've dealt with in the past.

And the obligatory pretty backhand comment.
 

SinneGOAT

Hall of Fame
Del Potro had imo the highest level of play overtime of the single slam club. Real big contender for a number 4 spot in the big 3. Maybe if Nadal stopped hitting balls to his forehand he could beat him once or twice on grass. However Ivanisevic’s 2001 Wimbledon run is absolutely legendary.
 
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Crazy Finn

Semi-Pro
Goran, for sure. Wimbledon 2001 was great all around. Frankly, Rafter deserved a Wimbledon, too - but thankfully Goran got a slam.

Runners up are Delpo, Stich, Chang. Delpo and Stich played really high level tennis, making you think that they'd get more than 1 for sure.

Commentator Roddick is fine. I wasn't a fan of him as a player.
 

daggerman

Professional
Chang and Andreescu

EDIT: forgot to add my reasons why. Chang: small, plucky underdogs winning slams in men's tennis is incredibly rare, plus Chang is a great guy. Andreescu: most dynamic women's player I've seen since Serena and Henin were in their primes. Swiatek isn't far behind.
 
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Cashman

Hall of Fame
Mark Edmondson
Underrated for sure. The AO might have been a second class Slam for international players in 1976, but there was plenty of home grown quality in that draw (plus Stan Smith).

Edmonson beat six seeds in a row to win that title - a mammoth effort in the 16-seed era. All the while commuting from an hour away, since he couldn’t afford accommodation near Kooyong.
 

Jack the Hack

Hall of Fame
Underrated for sure. The AO might have been a second class Slam for international players in 1976, but there was plenty of home grown quality in that draw (plus Stan Smith).

Edmonson beat six seeds in a row to win that title - a mammoth effort in the 16-seed era. All the while commuting from an hour away, since he couldn’t afford accommodation near Kooyong.
You have me super curious...

Since you are the Cashman and have his picture in your avatar, I figured you must be around the same age as me (I'm 48) and been around to watch a lot of the 80s matches. However, you posted in another thread about being excited to finally be able to play in 30 and over ITF tournaments, which would mean that you were probably not even alive yet when Cash was at his peak. I would have thought Lleyton Hewitt and Mark Philippoussis would have been closer to the age that would have inspired an Aussie in their early 30s now. And then you are providing details on an Australian player from the 1970s, Mark Edmonson, that most people do not know anything about.

Where did this historical appreciation come from for you personally? Why Pat Cash?

(BTW, I am a big Wilander and Edberg fan, so I nervously watched those Australian Open 5 setters over Cash in the finals in '87 and '88. Those had to be heartbreaking losses for Australian fans.)
 

ichaseballs

Rookie


Roddick and Chang both won their respective grand slams at a very early age.
Unlike most players who chase this title their entire careers, these guys got a taste early on and never again.
I think that came with it's own set of mental hurdles.
 
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BGod

Legend
Cash
Roddick
Stich
Krajicek

But Cash for the story (two 5 set losses at home slam, wins Wimbledon in a great draw). Fun in interviews.
 

Cashman

Hall of Fame
You have me super curious...

Since you are the Cashman and have his picture in your avatar, I figured you must be around the same age as me (I'm 48) and been around to watch a lot of the 80s matches. However, you posted in another thread about being excited to finally be able to play in 30 and over ITF tournaments, which would mean that you were probably not even alive yet when Cash was at his peak. I would have thought Lleyton Hewitt and Mark Philippoussis would have been closer to the age that would have inspired an Aussie in their early 30s now.
I was born in the mid 80s but I probably picked up a racquet for the first time in 1992, and although that was well after Cash’s global heyday he was still an active player and very much the man in Australia. He was my first tennis hero - all I wanted to do was to wear a chequered headband, serve and volley and win Wimbledon.

My other early heroes sort of followed from that - Edberg (because he was Lendl’s rival) and Rafter (because he was the new Cash). All surgical S&V players, whom I modelled my own game on more than the new generation of big servers and baseliners.

And then you are providing details on an Australian player from the 1970s, Mark Edmonson, that most people do not know anything about.
Whilst Edmondson is a bit obscure in global tennis terms, as our last home-grown home-Slam champion he is a bit of a celebrated figure in Australia. Growing up, the TV network would always drag him out for an interview during the AO and roll the footage of him trouncing Newk 6-1 in the fourth.

But my familiarity with Australian tennis history is mostly thanks to my grandmother, who attended pretty much every Australian Open from about the mid-50s to the mid-90s. She was a font of knowledge about our golden age and really fostered an interest in that era of tennis for me.
 
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Fiero425

Hall of Fame
Love that Andres Gomez kept Agassi without a major win for yet another event at the FO in 1990! Old man Andres lifted his game and took out Andre in 4 sets! ;)
 
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Crazy Finn

Semi-Pro
I was born in the mid 80s but I probably picked up a racquet for the first time in 1992, and although that was well after Cash’s global heyday he was still an active player and very much the man in Australia. He was my first tennis hero - all I wanted to do was to wear a chequered headband, serve and volley and win Wimbledon.
Thanks for making me feel old. I'm a decade older. I remember watching Borg-MacEnroe - Wimbledon 1980 - live (I was living in Europe at the time). I don't remember exactly when I started playing but I did some local park & rec summer tennis thing during junior high in the late 80's for a couple of summers. I first played with a wooden racquet that weighed a ton and made me terrible (it's somewhere around here....) but had a graphite Wilson Aggressor by the time I did parks & rec.

I watched a lot of Edberg, Becker, and Lendl growing up.
 

Fiero425

Hall of Fame
Thanks for making me feel old. I'm a decade older. I remember watching Borg-McEnroe - Wimbledon 1980 - live (I was living in Europe at the time). I don't remember exactly when I started playing but I did some local park & rec summer tennis thing during junior high in the late 80's for a couple of summers. I first played with a wooden racquet that weighed a ton and made me terrible (it's somewhere around here....) but had a graphite Wilson Aggressor by the time I did parks & rec.

I watched a lot of Edberg, Becker, and Lendl growing up.
You're both youngbloods in comparison to this old guy! I started playing at 14 in '71! Watched a lot of Borg, Connors, Nastase, Rosewall, Laver, Ashe, Vilas, & Newcombe when the tennis boom just started! Connors and Everts' 1974 Wimbledon wins and coupling started it all here in the States! I learned more by watching women's tennis and marveled at some of the more athletic ladies like Court, King, Goolagong, & Wade! "Breakfast At Wimbledon" started the year before with Borg v Tanner in '79! It went 5 sets and was a great start to live tennis at a major! Waking up at 6 AM to see it was no fun living in California though! :sneaky:
 

Cashman

Hall of Fame
I first played with a wooden racquet that weighed a ton and made me terrible (it's somewhere around here....) but had a graphite Wilson Aggressor by the time I did parks & rec.
My first racquet was a Mizuno Junior 23, which I used for too long after growing out of it and left me with the bad habit of hanging my hand partially off the butt-cap (a la Nadal)
 
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