who started the "come on"?

WhiskeyEE

G.O.A.T.
first person I remember to do it was hewitt. Seems pretty lame that so many players copy him, or whoever started it.
 
I think it's hard to say who started it. I mean I often say it as well even before I ever heard about anyone named Hewitt. It is just a nice energetic phrase to keep you focused and "on".
But anyway...let's say it's Hewitt's fault. =)
 

Aonex

Semi-Pro
Yeah, I think it's Lleyton's fault. But for whatever reason, whenever he did it, I didn't mind. Maybe it's cause it fit his fiery personality so well, not to mention the fact that he'd only do it at key points in the match, not after every point like some of the women do these days. Also, his was more primal... "Come oonnnnnnnnn!!!"
 

Moose Malloy

G.O.A.T.
hardly anyone said it in the 80s(or pumped their fists)

I have an old match where Lendl does it like once during the entire match, & the commentators are really amused.

Whoever started it is debatable, but you can't dispute that Hewitt took it to another level.

I think it got more common with the women in the early 90s(I'm thinking specifically of 14 year old Capriati) I recall young Agassi doing it as well.

Personally, I find it rather tacky, unless its a big point(whoo-hoo! I just won a point at 1-1 in the 1st on Court 13 in front of like 2 people!)
 

WhiskeyEE

G.O.A.T.
Yeah, I think it's Lleyton's fault. But for whatever reason, whenever he did it, I didn't mind. Maybe it's cause it fit his fiery personality so well, not to mention the fact that he'd only do it at key points in the match, not after every point like some of the women do these days. Also, his was more primal... "Come oonnnnnnnnn!!!"
ahaha yeah I loved when lleyton would do it. "Come oooon give it to me!!!"

hardly anyone said it in the 80s(or pumped their fists)

I have an old match where Lendl does it like once during the entire match, & the commentators are really amused.

Whoever started it is debatable, but you can't dispute that Hewitt took it to another level.

I think it got more common with the women in the early 90s(I'm thinking specifically of 14 year old Capriati) I recall young Agassi doing it as well.

Personally, I find it rather tacky, unless its a big point(whoo-hoo! I just won a point at 1-1 in the 1st on Court 13 in front of like 2 people!)
Ah ok. Thanks.
 

GFang

New User
Shouldn't players say "come on" after they LOSE a point? I would think they would say something else like "hell yeah" or "yippee"...
 

WhiskeyEE

G.O.A.T.
Shouldn't players say "come on" after they LOSE a point? I would think they would say something else like "hell yeah" or "yippee"...
well the come on in tennis was meant to sarcastic to the opposing player. Like when hewitt said it, it was like "that the best you got!?" And now other players like sharapova just mumble it to themselves and it doesn't make any sense.
 

Aonex

Semi-Pro
^^ Hmm, I'm not sure about that... I think he did it after winning a point as well, to pump himself up when he's losing. So the motivation to do it is the same as, say, Sharapova... it's just that Shar does it after every point... I mean, do you seriously need to motivate yourself after every point? I think that's the main difference.
 

GFang

New User
^^ Hmm, I'm not sure about that... I think he did it after winning a point as well, to pump himself up when he's losing. So the motivation to do it is the same as, say, Sharapova... it's just that Shar does it after every point... I mean, do you seriously need to motivate yourself after every point? I think that's the main difference.
I have to say, Lleyton's "c'mooooon!"s are actually endearing; they fit his fiery personality and are funny because his voice is so high-pitched. Sharapova just sounds like a teenage brat trying to be tough.
 

Aonex

Semi-Pro
I have to say, Lleyton's "c'mooooon!"s are actually endearing; they fit his fiery personality and are funny because his voice is so high-pitched. Sharapova just sounds like a teenage brat trying to be tough.
I agree, that's what I said on my first post in the thread. I wasn't comparing how they sound though, I was comparing the motivation behind making the come on. I think the OP was mistaken by saying it was to show up the other player.
 

WhiskeyEE

G.O.A.T.
I agree, that's what I said on my first post in the thread. I wasn't comparing how they sound though, I was comparing the motivation behind making the come on. I think the OP was mistaken by saying it was to show up the other player.
I didn't mean he did it to bash the other player. I know it's just to psyche yourself up, but the context of the phrase is directed at opposing player, not telling oneself to "come on."

For example at this video starting at 5:30. He says "come on give it to me!" to obviously he isn't telling himself to come on.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JM0J2duKrYM
 

NamRanger

G.O.A.T.
Hewitt popularized it, although I'm not sure if he was the first. Connors and McEnroe were known to fire themselves up after big points.
 
Players from the 80's I specifically remember saying it:

Lendl, Mcenroe, Navratilova, Connors (VERY RARELY), Agassi, Mayotte, Gilbert, Courier, Chang, Stich.

But when these players said it, they were talking to themselves, Hewitt was saying it to the opponent, the crowd, and anyone within 1 mile.
 

batz

G.O.A.T.
I played table tennis to a reasonably high standard in the early 80s - many people would exclaim 'c'mon' after winning a point back then.
 
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