Who the Heck Can Afford 'Em

desertgeezer

New User
$120 for a pair of Nike or Adidas tennis shoes that are worn out in less than six month?

And, the six month guarantee? Did you ever read the fine print? The shoe will never get to the point where they honor the guarantee because the shoe becomes un-wearable long before then.

What a rip-off. It probably costs Nike or Adidas less than $5 to produce the shoe in China and maybe another $5 to have it shipped to the U.S.

And why, when they have a popular shoe that everyone likes, do they stop producing them and begin producing a shoe that turns out to be inferior?

I just kind of get the feeling that shoe manufactures don't really give a rat's butt about the consumer.
 

Marshredder

Semi-Pro
They're a business.

You produce for as little as possible.

You sell for as much as people will pay.

You dont care about the consumer, you care about profits.

Thats how business works I'm afraid.
 

scotus

G.O.A.T.
$120 for a pair of Nike or Adidas tennis shoes that are worn out in less than six month?

And, the six month guarantee? Did you ever read the fine print? The shoe will never get to the point where they honor the guarantee because the shoe becomes un-wearable long before then.
That's a good point.

I too hate having to wear slippery shoes, so I refuse to keep wearing them to the point the midsoles get exposed.

Maybe you can loan them out to some high school kids who like to wear fancy-looking shoes for free for a month or so and then return them to you when they are ripe for replacement warranty.
 
I'm starting to think who can afford the Nadal and Federer polos/crews, at £40+ a pop its a lot of money to be spending, a year ago it used to be £30 and even then I thought it was expensive! Do you think less people are buying this apparel these days?
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
I've had great luck with the Gel Game 2's from Asics. They cost me about half what you're quoting there on the "premium" stuff from Nike and Adidas, but the bonus for me has been a great shoe for my particular feet. Haven't had to try out the Gel Game 3's yet, but hope to get a good experience sometime down the road when my multiple sets of "2's" wear out.

I agree that the cost of those sneaks has gotten out of hand... Then again, $120 would cover only about three full tanks of gas for my car. Supply and demand and here we are right in the middle.
 

magnut

Hall of Fame
That's a good point.

I too hate having to wear slippery shoes, so I refuse to keep wearing them to the point the midsoles get exposed.

Maybe you can loan them out to some high school kids who like to wear fancy-looking shoes for free for a month or so and then return them to you when they are ripe for replacement warranty.
Wear them until your no longer comfortable then......and I hate to say it.....take a belt sander to them.
 

XFactorer

Hall of Fame
They're a business.

You produce for as little as possible.

You sell for as much as people will pay.

You dont care about the consumer, you care about profits.

Thats how business works I'm afraid.
I feel Nike cares about the consumer, otherwise they wouldn't be as successful as they are - especially since their products come with a premium price tag.

As for the actual cost of making the shoe, who knows?! My estimate is closer to $30 for the cost of getting it to market. And once Nike sells it to retailers, that's the end of their profit (whole sale price - estimated $30). If you buy it from Nike, it's probably a bigger profit margin.

Blah blah blah, it's business.
 

BreakPoint

Bionic Poster
The first rule of business:

You charge as much as the customer is willing to pay to maximize your profits.

Obviously, customers have been willing to pay what the shoe companies charge or else they would have either lowered their prices by now or gotten out of the tennis shoe business.
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
What a rip-off. It probably costs Nike or Adidas less than $5 to produce the shoe in China and maybe another $5 to have it shipped to the U.S.
don't forget costs to get the shoes to the retailers and the marketing costs like the endorsement money they pay djoker, nadal, fed, murray and others. these millions of dollars have to be absorbed somewhere. the marketing costs probably amount to much more than the cost to manufacture & get the shoe to the US.
 

ssonosk

Semi-Pro
I'm starting to think who can afford the Nadal and Federer polos/crews, at £40+ a pop its a lot of money to be spending, a year ago it used to be £30 and even then I thought it was expensive! Do you think less people are buying this apparel these days?
if the price went up people still buy them
don't forget costs to get the shoes to the retailers and the marketing costs like the endorsement money they pay djoker, nadal, fed, murray and others. these millions of dollars have to be absorbed somewhere. the marketing costs probably amount to much more than the cost to manufacture & get the shoe to the US.
you also have to take into account all the testing they do when they develop a shoe, and that's not cheap.
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
Through branding and advertising - ie propaganda - businesses buy themselves relative immunity from competition.
 

hcb0804

Hall of Fame
$120 for a pair of Nike or Adidas tennis shoes that are worn out in less than six month?

And, the six month guarantee? Did you ever read the fine print? The shoe will never get to the point where they honor the guarantee because the shoe becomes un-wearable long before then.

What a rip-off. It probably costs Nike or Adidas less than $5 to produce the shoe in China and maybe another $5 to have it shipped to the U.S.

And why, when they have a popular shoe that everyone likes, do they stop producing them and begin producing a shoe that turns out to be inferior?

I just kind of get the feeling that shoe manufactures don't really give a rat's butt about the consumer.
Who the heck can afford them?
I can.:)
 

Jfolks259

Rookie
it's as simple as supply and demand. obviously since the prices keep going up, nike hasn't noticed a drop in sales.

as much as i hate it, i keep contributing to the problem by buying more and more :)
 
While its true not everyone can afford these expensive shoes, a majority can so businesses continue to charge more until the consumer can or will not pay for it.
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
if the price went up people still buy them


you also have to take into account all the testing they do when they develop a shoe, and that's not cheap.
you're absolutely correct...R&D costs are significant as well and need to be absorbed by the consumer as well.
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
it's as simple as supply and demand. obviously since the prices keep going up, nike hasn't noticed a drop in sales.

as much as i hate it, i keep contributing to the problem by buying more and more :)
actually based on a conversation i had w/ the owner of a tennis store chain that closed a number of stores in the past few years who talks to nike reps all the time, nike would love to get out of the tennis apparel business because they're losing money. this kind of makes sense. back in the late 70s and 80s, you could walk into any sporting goods, shoe store, or dept store like big 5, oshmans, foot locker, macys, jcp, etc and be able to buy nike wimbledons, adidas stan smiths, lendls, nastases, etc tennis shoes. now you walk into these stores and most don't even carry tennis shoes. even the adidas or nike store don't even carry their tennis shoe lines even though they have pics of sharapova, nadal, and fed plastered all over the walls. the only place i've found tennis shoes being sold in brick & mortar stores are specialty tennis shops and maybe dick's sporting goods or sport chalet. big 5 doesn't offer them anymore. this can only mean one thing. there's not much demand for tennis shoes which supports the owner of the tennis store that the apparel market for tennis is shrinking.
 

RyanRF

Professional
I bought a pair of Breathe Cages for $80 on sale from Tennis Warehouse over a year ago. The Breathe Cages came with a durability guarantee.

Within 3-4 months I wore them out and sent them back to Nike. Less than two weeks later Nike sent me a voucher for $115. I used the voucher to buy CourtBallistec 2.3s, which also had a durability guarantee.

Then I wore those out and sent them back. Got another voucher, bought a new pair of 2.3s.

Then I wore those out, sent them back, used the voucher for some new 3.3s.

.....

Each time I sent it in it cost me about $10 shipping, and each new pair I bought had about $15 tax and shipping.

$80+10+15+10+15+10+15 = $155 for four pairs of top-of-the-line Nike's, and in a few months I'll send in the 3.3s for another. That seems like a pretty good deal to me.

Oh, and this doesn't work for Adidas. Adidas sends you a new pair of identical shoes instead of a voucher for money. You do not get a new guarantee card.
 

RyanRF

Professional
And, the six month guarantee? Did you ever read the fine print? The shoe will never get to the point where they honor the guarantee because the shoe becomes un-wearable long before then.
I have never had a problem with the 'fine print' you are complaining about. All that is required is a tiny patch on the bottom of the shoe where the rubber has worn completely through. And no, shoes that have worn through most of the tread are not 'unwearable'.
 

Tyrus

Professional
Gotta remember, Nike is a marketing company that sells it's brand.

I used to work at niketown, the philosophy was to sell more shoes. The brand is strong enough to do it well.

U don't see people line up for vapors like they do for jordans.
 

BreakPoint

Bionic Poster
I bought a pair of Breathe Cages for $80 on sale from Tennis Warehouse over a year ago. The Breathe Cages came with a durability guarantee.

Within 3-4 months I wore them out and sent them back to Nike. Less than two weeks later Nike sent me a voucher for $115. I used the voucher to buy CourtBallistec 2.3s, which also had a durability guarantee.

Then I wore those out and sent them back. Got another voucher, bought a new pair of 2.3s.

Then I wore those out, sent them back, used the voucher for some new 3.3s.

.....

Each time I sent it in it cost me about $10 shipping, and each new pair I bought had about $15 tax and shipping.

$80+10+15+10+15+10+15 = $155 for four pairs of top-of-the-line Nike's, and in a few months I'll send in the 3.3s for another. That seems like a pretty good deal to me.

Oh, and this doesn't work for Adidas. Adidas sends you a new pair of identical shoes instead of a voucher for money. You do not get a new guarantee card.
Didn't Nike ask you for a receipt that indicated that you did not pay with cash but with a voucher each time you sent in a used pair of shoes for replacement?
 

tlm

G.O.A.T.
If you play a lot it works out, i have been using barricades for years. I buy a pair wear them out in 2-3 months then i get a warranty pair for the cost of shipping. So i buy 2 pair a year and get 2 free pair a year. So i am getting to use the top of the line shoe but am only paying for a mid price shoe.
 

RyanRF

Professional
Didn't Nike ask you for a receipt that indicated that you did not pay with cash but with a voucher each time you sent in a used pair of shoes for replacement?
I sent them a copy of the receipt from nike.com. Yes, the receipt indicates that out of the total $135 purchase, $120 was from a voucher and $15 was from my credit card. No issues whatsoever.
 
O

ondray

Guest
Tennis is a quite an expensive sport these days. Strings and balls are hurting my pockets. I'm seriously thinking of switching to yoga.
 
Tennis is a quite an expensive sport these days. Strings and balls are hurting my pockets. I'm seriously thinking of switching to yoga.
not as expensive as hockey. My sticks costs me about $200 each and I go through plenty of them a season. Not to mention the costs to keep my skates sharpened. Massive amount of tape I go through.
 

spacediver

Hall of Fame
Tennis is a quite an expensive sport these days. Strings and balls are hurting my pockets. I'm seriously thinking of switching to yoga.
I recently bought a second hand klippermate for about $80 , and learned to string from the manual and youtube. I bought a 660 foot reel of head rip control for about $100 (16-18 string jobs).

Basically, I pay about $6 for each string job now, and I have full control over the process.
 
O

ondray

Guest
I recently bought a second hand klippermate for about $80 , and learned to string from the manual and youtube. I bought a 660 foot reel of head rip control for about $100 (16-18 string jobs).

Basically, I pay about $6 for each string job now, and I have full control over the process.
And you can't blame the stringer for bad stringjobs anymore! Haha.
 

jwbarrientos

Hall of Fame
The price is related with many thing, where the cost is just one of them. Many pointed out the brand plus marketing efforts (including pennies for pro athletes that use them) , those things contribute to the brand/model positioning in customers base.

If you find expensive, is even worse in another regions like Latin America where those shoes are more expensive.
 

Stewy30

New User
In my opinion, compared to other sports sneakers and shoes for running etc, tennis shoes are relatively inexpensive(especially when on sale). I remember buying top of the line runners for $200.
 

Bud

Bionic Poster
$120 for a pair of Nike or Adidas tennis shoes that are worn out in less than six month?

And, the six month guarantee? Did you ever read the fine print? The shoe will never get to the point where they honor the guarantee because the shoe becomes un-wearable long before then.

What a rip-off. It probably costs Nike or Adidas less than $5 to produce the shoe in China and maybe another $5 to have it shipped to the U.S.

And why, when they have a popular shoe that everyone likes, do they stop producing them and begin producing a shoe that turns out to be inferior?

I just kind of get the feeling that shoe manufactures don't really give a rat's butt about the consumer.
First, buy them when they're on sale. The B6's in black are currently about $85.

They always honor the guarantee if you legitimately wear them out within 6 months. I've received 3 pairs of new Barricades in the past using their 6-month guarantee. When I was playing 10-12 hours per week I wore out Barricades in a bit over 5 months.

Shipping is about $12 when you send in your old shoes.

For about $100, you have awesome tennis shoes for an entire year.

So, I really can't empathize or agree with your position.
 
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