Why didn't they stop the interstellar object?

Sunny Ali

Hall of Fame
Forgive me if this comes across as ignorant. I'm not very well versed with these kind of things.

A few months ago, space scanners detected an object that they said was from another galaxy. There was speculation that it might be an alien craft. So I have 2 questions-

1. If it was an alien craft, why didn't they try to intercept it? It would have given us definite proof that life exists outside of earth.

2. How did the craft come so close to other planets or stars but not become caught up in the orbits of those planets/stars? Wouldn't that indicate that it's not just some huge rock but a spacecraft with its own propulsion systems?
 

Mr.Lob

Legend
Link? Would take hundreds of light years to intercept an object that far away. Speed, proximity and trajectory would determine if the object could be caught in a planet's gravitational pull.
 

Mr.Lob

Legend
Lob ... here's the link for the Interstellar object
O.k..So passing thru our solar system. Object is described as if probably an asteroid. Traveling at a high enough speed to escape the gravity of our sun, and will return to interstellar space. Hard to imagine the vastness of space and distance. When you read that galaxies can "collide".... its more if a collective assimilation than a collision of planets.
 

Harry_Wild

G.O.A.T.
Our space technology is still based on the WWII V rocket of the 1944. We are at the very bottom of the ladder in terms of space travel! If a spaceship from another galaxy came here, we are the insects and they are the humans in terms of technological speaking. We could not even fathom their level of technology in their space ship!
 

Sunny Ali

Hall of Fame
O.k..So passing thru our solar system. Object is described as if probably an asteroid. Traveling at a high enough speed to escape the gravity of our sun, and will return to interstellar space. Hard to imagine the vastness of space and distance. When you read that galaxies can "collide".... its more if a collective assimilation than a collision of planets.
I hear you. Otha, when I heard that light takes 2 1/2 million years to reach our neighboring galaxy, the Andromeda Galaxy, my jaw dropped. Omala!
 
We dealt with one alien who resides today in Poobiego and is a major cause of famines. Why do you want to risk with more?
Are you aware of the entire subterranean mythos?

If not, I implore you to get the full scoop from @stringertom .

It's fairly legendary in its scope. Really plumbs the depths, if you get my drift.

The aroma is truly pungent, sure. But one has to imagine that it's mitigated to some extent by the blockage. :oops:
 
Otha Azure ... I have no idea what @FedFosterWallace and you are talking about. Clarify or link please? :)
It's a long and sordid tale, in all truth.

And I didn't want to be the one to have to unfold the grisly narrative.

I mean, the stench alone is a thing that defies any rational description. It is as if something long deceased had multiplied its fetid characteristics by infinity.

Try to imagine it. Right. Not possible. And even if it were, it would result in instantaneous unconsciousness. That is the degree of repugnance we're talking about here.

Beginning to get a sense of things?

If interested, there is much, much more to this revolting and wretched saga.
 

Sunny Ali

Hall of Fame
It's a long and sordid tale, in all truth.

And I didn't want to be the one to have to unfold the grisly narrative.

I mean, the stench alone is a thing that defies any rational description. It is as if something long deceased had multiplied its fetid characteristics by infinity.

Try to imagine it. Right. Not possible. And even if it were, it would result in instantaneous unconsciousness. That is the degree of repugnance we're talking about here.

Beginning to get a sense of things?

If interested, there is much, much more to this revolting and wretched saga.
LOL, I get a feeling @Azure and you have tag teamed up on me :-D Both of you replied to me yet I'm still clueless because your answers read like some cryptic language :)
 

dgold44

G.O.A.T.
Forgive me if this comes across as ignorant. I'm not very well versed with these kind of things.

A few months ago, space scanners detected an object that they said was from another galaxy. There was speculation that it might be an alien craft. So I have 2 questions-

1. If it was an alien craft, why didn't they try to intercept it? It would have given us definite proof that life exists outside of earth.

2. How did the craft come so close to other planets or stars but not become caught up in the orbits of those planets/stars? Wouldn't that indicate that it's not just some huge rock but a spacecraft with its own propulsion systems?
You realize these objects are moving 20,000 miles an hour and our space tech is primitive
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
ET was just passing thru. They took a long look at the Moscow and Washington DC areas but detected no signs of intelligent life. Headed out of our solar system in their ongoing quest to explore strange new worlds, seek out new life and new civilizations, and boldly go where no alien life form has gone before.
 
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Sentinel

Bionic Poster
1. If it was an alien craft, why didn't they try to intercept it? It would have given us definite proof that life exists outside of earth.
Silly chap, are you not familiar with the Intergalactic Rule Book. Did they not teach you that in school, or even at IIT-Madras ?
Did they not teach you about Territorial Space and Interplanetary Space ?
For all you know it was a drop volley of Saboosh that shanked and went into outer space after a spicy mexican meal. You don't want to intercept it. Just quietly let it pass through and go to Andromeda and do some mA.S.S extinctions there. :D
 

Tshooter

Legend
It sounds like it was probably Xenu arriving for tea time with Tom Cruise not to chit-chat with average Earthlings. You have to be at Thetan Level 8 for an invite.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
Forgive me if this comes across as ignorant. I'm not very well versed with these kind of things.

A few months ago, space scanners detected an object that they said was from another galaxy. There was speculation that it might be an alien craft. So I have 2 questions-

1. If it was an alien craft, why didn't they try to intercept it? It would have given us definite proof that life exists outside of earth.

2. How did the craft come so close to other planets or stars but not become caught up in the orbits of those planets/stars? Wouldn't that indicate that it's not just some huge rock but a spacecraft with its own propulsion systems?
Was it from Uranus?
 

mmk

Hall of Fame
On a serious note, Oumuamua was moving at > 98000 mph. The fastest craft ever launched by humans to date is the New Horizons which is moving at ~36000 mph. Nothing we have could catch up with Ourmuamua or Borisov.
 

Harry_Wild

G.O.A.T.
On a serious note, Oumuamua was moving at > 98000 mph. The fastest craft ever launched by humans to date is the New Horizons which is moving at ~36000 mph. Nothing we have could catch up with Ourmuamua or Borisov.
If the intercepting craft/spaceship is far ahead of the Oumuamua with an ability to have maneuvering, it should be able to plot an interception point and meet Oumuamua if it close by!
 

Sunny Ali

Hall of Fame
Your link contains the answer of your question.

You are familiar with comets that have their own orbit like Hailey's. You are familiar that some of them have orbits that go far outside that of Pluto (into the Oort clouds iirc).
Sentinel bhai ... I'm not very good at these subjects. You wouldn't believe it but I did tell you IT guys are not the brightest cookies. At least, I'm not. And that is why I chose IT. When I interviewed for my first job in electronics, the interviewer wondered aloud how the hell I received my degree. That's when I made the decision to quickly switch to IT.
 

Sunny Ali

Hall of Fame
Silly chap, are you not familiar with the Intergalactic Rule Book. Did they not teach you that in school, or even at IIT-Madras ?
Did they not teach you about Territorial Space and Interplanetary Space ?
For all you know it was a drop volley of Saboosh that shanked and went into outer space after a spicy mexican meal. You don't want to intercept it. Just quietly let it pass through and go to Andromeda and do some mA.S.S extinctions there. :D
Otha Omala ... you got so many things right about me but IIT-Madras? LOL X 10,000! I could not even fully understand the questions in the IIT entrance exam, leave alone answering them! :-D
 

Sunny Ali

Hall of Fame
On a serious note, Oumuamua was moving at > 98000 mph. The fastest craft ever launched by humans to date is the New Horizons which is moving at ~36000 mph. Nothing we have could catch up with Ourmuamua or Borisov.
That is what I don't understand. How can an object without propulsion move faster than one with propulsion systems? If that is possible, why does NH need propulsion?
 

Sunny Ali

Hall of Fame
Sorry, was it MIT or Harvard ?
Dei Sentinel ... Omala, either you're taking the p*iss or you really have an inflated opinion about me! I was never good enough for these places but I'm proud to say I take this verse from the Bhagavad Gita very seriously-

vidyā-vinaya-sampanne
brāhmaṇe gavi hastini
śuni caiva śva-pāke ca
paṇḍitāḥ sama-darśinaḥ


This essentially means that a learned man (or woman) is one who by virtue of true knowledge has the ability to see and treat equally all living beings, whether it is a brāhmaṇa, a cow, an elephant, a dog or a dog-eater.
 

mmk

Hall of Fame
If the intercepting craft/spaceship is far ahead of the Oumuamua with an ability to have maneuvering, it should be able to plot an interception point and meet Oumuamua if it close by!
Rather big If there. Basically we would have had to launch prior to observing it, especially given that it had a CPA to Earth of 0.276 a.u. (over 25 million miles), and we didn't actually notice it until it was past that point. So to intercept at 25 million miles, using New Horizon's speed (which didn't get to its max speed until it got gravity assists from going around other planets) the intercepting craft would have needed to be launched about a month prior to CPA, and even with that, it would have been an impact intercept, and nothing much would have happened to Oumuamua, but the craft would have been destroyed. I'm not a rocket scientist, but I do work with a number of them.
 

mmk

Hall of Fame
That is what I don't understand. How can an object without propulsion move faster than one with propulsion systems? If that is possible, why does NH need propulsion?
How fast are you moving? You may think you aren't moving at all, but let's assume someone is standing on the equator. The circumference of the Earth is a bit under 25000 miles. The Earth rotates around its axis every 24 hours, so someone on the equator is moving over 1000 mph. Next, the Earth is roughly 93 million miles from the Sun, and orbits every 365.25 days. Approximating the eliptical orbit as a circle, that means that the Earth is moving at roughly 66,660 mph, and you are as well. The solar system is orbiting the center of the galaxy as well, at around 483,000 mph. So, everything in space is moving, and there isn't a whole lot to slow anything down without a collision. Yes, there is dust, and small pieces of stuff, but nothing anywhere near as dense as air.
So, let's say that some rock orbiting another star gets bumped by another rock, and there is sufficient energy in the collision to throw it out of that star's orbit. It goes sailing through space at tens of thousands of miles per hour, no propulsion needed. Gravity from any number of objects might change its course and speed, but by and large it is going to keep on moving at a high rate of speed. If it hits something of sufficient size it might slow down, it might break up, it might be consumed (think of the comet Shumaker Levy 9 hitting Jupiter). But space is a very big place, and even something the size of the Earth is miniscule compared to the distances between stars, so the odds of something like Oumuamua hitting anything are close to nil.
 

Sunny Ali

Hall of Fame
How fast are you moving? You may think you aren't moving at all, but let's assume someone is standing on the equator. The circumference of the Earth is a bit under 25000 miles. The Earth rotates around its axis every 24 hours, so someone on the equator is moving over 1000 mph. Next, the Earth is roughly 93 million miles from the Sun, and orbits every 365.25 days. Approximating the eliptical orbit as a circle, that means that the Earth is moving at roughly 66,660 mph, and you are as well. The solar system is orbiting the center of the galaxy as well, at around 483,000 mph. So, everything in space is moving, and there isn't a whole lot to slow anything down without a collision. Yes, there is dust, and small pieces of stuff, but nothing anywhere near as dense as air.
So, let's say that some rock orbiting another star gets bumped by another rock, and there is sufficient energy in the collision to throw it out of that star's orbit. It goes sailing through space at tens of thousands of miles per hour, no propulsion needed. Gravity from any number of objects might change its course and speed, but by and large it is going to keep on moving at a high rate of speed. If it hits something of sufficient size it might slow down, it might break up, it might be consumed (think of the comet Shumaker Levy 9 hitting Jupiter). But space is a very big place, and even something the size of the Earth is miniscule compared to the distances between stars, so the odds of something like Oumuamua hitting anything are close to nil.
Brilliant explanation! Thank you mmk for taking the time to explain this in simple terms (y)
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
Dei Sentinel ... Omala, either you're taking the p*iss or you really have an inflated opinion about me! I was never good enough for these places but I'm proud to say I take this verse from the Bhagavad Gita very seriously-
Some objects cannot be moved.

IYKWIM.
 
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