Why do some recreational players have so many racquets??

Eddie G

New User
Some tennis players I play with come to the court with four to five different racquets. So I guess this is the norm. If it gives you some kind of advantage bringing different racquets to the court, how do you know which different types of racquets to get?
 

Eddie G

New User
No, not old frames. Really fully stringed tennis rackets. A lot of times expensive ones. There has to be an edge it gives them. That's what I'm trying to figure out here.
 

Yamin

Professional
I demoed pretty much every racket available this year getting back into tennis after 10 years. Brought two people back to tennis with me. We had 8 demos at a time at least. Probably looked foolish.

People also like to try new things.

Sometimes an equipment swap is a good quick fix.
 

4-string

Professional
No, not old frames. Really fully stringed tennis rackets. A lot of times expensive ones. There has to be an edge it gives them. That's what I'm trying to figure out here.
So consumer habits are rational all of a sudden?
 

eah123

Semi-Pro
I have 3 but should really just bring 2. But then it’s too much mental effort to decide on which 2. It helps me burn calories to carry extra weight in my bag? I suspect most people use the same BS justification.
 

esm

Hall of Fame
I have 3 but should really just bring 2. But then it’s too much mental effort to decide on which 2. It helps me burn calories to carry extra weight in my bag? I suspect most people use the same BS justification.
my fix was to get a (much) smaller racquet bag... then i am only able to carry 2, or max 3 if i really squeeze the 3rd one in and make scratches.. lol
 

ngoster

Rookie
If the racquets are cycled out often then they may just be demoing, otherwise, they may just be going through a tennis identity crisis haha. I normally bring 2 of my gamers but will sometimes bring a third that I haven't hit in awhile and thought it'd be fun.
 

ryushen21

Legend
Some tennis players I play with come to the court with four to five different racquets. So I guess this is the norm. If it gives you some kind of advantage bringing different racquets to the court, how do you know which different types of racquets to get?
,My bag has 5 racquets in it. 3x VCore 100: 2 setup and strung identically with the third being my string mule, a VCore 95. and an EZone DR 100. I rarely compete with anything other than the VCore 100 but the others earned their spot in the bag so they get to stay.
 
Not sure about different types because of variance in characteristics, but people carry multiple racquets when they're string breakers
 

DeeeFoo

Rookie
I have a friend like this. Most of the time, they're collectors who like owning many different racquets. My friend still has a primary/main racquet of choice, but they find it fun to play with and try out different racquets. Sometimes it's because they string racquets for other people and keep them all in the bag.
 
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blai212

Hall of Fame
I bring 10 racquets every time I go to play. Hence why I use a yonex 12 pack bag. 7 VCP97, 3 pure strike 98 3rd gens, each with a different string setup. @Yamin I also took 10 years off and just started playing again 4-5 years ago…it is simply FUN to try new racquets/strings but for the real reason that when I came back to the game, my first racquet of choice was the RF97 which subsequently destroyed my arm from overuse (I could only last 45 mins before my arm got fatigued but I chose to play longer) All of my racquets are in similar ballpark of ~300-310g with 97/98sq in and 6pts HL balance but they all offer different pros/cons that I use to my advantage. VCP97 provides amazing manueverability, surgical control but smallish sweetspot and low powered while the pure strike has a more forgiving sweetspot and intoxicating power/spin but not as maneuverable as VCP. Dont even get me started on strings…

to clarify: I do it for arm comfort. I am not ashamed to keep switching racquet or strings…whatever will provide the best experience is my setup of choice
 
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WarrenMP

Professional
I noticed the same. I normally play with one and bring a long a backup in case my strings break. What is funny is when they are not playing well, they switch to a completely different racquet. They continue doing it until they go back to their main racquet. I want to tell them it is not the racquet, it is you.
 
I carry several because I'm indecisive and haven't chosen "the one" yet. This is clearly not a real question and just a complaint, but what's not clear is why it bothers you OP haha.
 
I have about 6 racquets in my bag at most at a time. Sometimes 5.

2 main racquets I play best with strung similarly 16x19 300g
A slightly heavier 18x20 310g that I like but gets tiring in singles
And then 2 fun racquets....an old prince graphite 90 or snaewert hoodie or an older prestige I like playing single hand bh with rather than double handed I usually play.

Depends also on who im playing. At my club the strength of opponent varies from similar to me to significantly weaker so I get to play with my fun racquets in the weaker games.

When a stronger player does come I have my match racquets ready to play.

If i play league or tournament i usually take 3 racquets only. Mainly in case i break strings
 

Rentege

New User
For fun? I thought the demoing process was so enjoyable the one time I did it that I bought a few. Nice to have different options for different situations (hitting around with friends vs. a serious competitive match). I never switch in a real match or blame the racket though. All of mine are relatively close, spec-wise too so switching between them isn’t too drastic. Would I be marginally better if I stuck to one? Probably. Would I have more fun? Doubt it.
 

baowow

Rookie
For some of us is part of the fun. We like trying different racquets, strings and configurations. Keeps the economy going.

I'm losing a little sleep paying almost $300 for the new vcore pro though. Must sell some racquets now...
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
I have 5 rackets in my bag for no other reason than that it holds 5 rackets and I've got nowhere else good to put them. I do tend to use some of them depending on my mood but usually stick with my favorite in the moment.
 

lstewart

Semi-Pro
Interesting that some people bring so many different model frames to the court at the same time, other than of course for just trying out different models. I carry 4 of the same Yonex Ezone DR98 frames in my bag. In the old pre-poly days, I would break alot more strings, so mutiple rackets were needed. I seldom break poly, but do at times switch up frames due to string age or tension, or maybe grabbing one with a newer grip wrap.
 
Been playing with POG's Tours for a few decades that were first introduced in 1980. A pro let me borrow his and been "hooked" ever since--no good reason to change--people keep giving me their old ones that have been collecting dust in their closets. I have about a dozen of all different "stripes". I Know a kid who bought an old stock one that had never been used at Goodwill for $5 with the wrapper still covering the original Fairway grip. A tournament player buddy gave me his three OS for free, one is brand new with the center rack card still in it--haven't tried them yet, waiting until my old age and may need some additional topspin. Have a few variants like the Extenders and Monos I bought just to learn what their different playing characteristics were but no longer touch them.

Used to buy new rackets usually when the old ones wore out and they always felt GREAT until you lose the first match with them--then it's back to the same old game--a new racket gives a short-lived placebo effect. For rec play I carry two sticks, one with gut and one with nylon for damp conditions in the smallest TW $10 bag. For competitive play I'll carry three sticks, two with gut and one with nylon, in the next size up TW bag--or a BIG bag for tournaments that will hold spare shoes, clothes, and everything else for serious play, a jump in the pool to refresh between matches and toiletries to shower-up for the tournament party.

Won't be changing sticks anytime soon unless the POG's get too heavy to move around in my old age--"It's not the violin--it's the violinist."
 
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Vicious49

Hall of Fame
I carry several because I'm indecisive and haven't chosen "the one" yet. This is clearly not a real question and just a complaint, but what's not clear is why it bothers you OP haha.
For fun? I thought the demoing process was so enjoyable the one time I did it that I bought a few. Nice to have different options for different situations (hitting around with friends vs. a serious competitive match). I never switch in a real match or blame the racket though. All of mine are relatively close, spec-wise too so switching between them isn’t too drastic. Would I be marginally better if I stuck to one? Probably. Would I have more fun? Doubt it.
For some of us is part of the fun. We like trying different racquets, strings and configurations. Keeps the economy going.
These all pretty much describe why I carry so many racquets.
 

aaron_h27

Professional
Normally bring 2 rackets, one freshly strung, the other one with old strings. I start off with the old one and go to the fresh string job if im having trouble controlling my shots
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
Short answer: it depends.

My favorite subtype of this group is the player who struts out onto the court with 12 freshly strung frames in a giant bag, dressed from head to toe in the latest RF or Nadal gear. For one, I find that whole “shtick” hilarious. For two, IME people like this usually can’t play at the representative level.

The guy or gal who shows up with no bag, a couple mis-matched banged up racquets, shoes with holes in them, coke can for a water bottle…yeah, that’s the type of player to worry about.

Of course there’s a lot of folks out there who just aren’t “married” to any one particular racquet - maybe they like to play different racquets based on who they’re playing or whether they’re playing singles or doubles, or maybe they just like to keep things fresh and interesting by having a few different racquets in the bag. Nothing wrong with that.
 

glenWs

Rookie
Some tennis players I play with come to the court with four to five different racquets. So I guess this is the norm. If it gives you some kind of advantage bringing different racquets to the court, how do you know which different types of racquets to get?
I think you're asking some pretty silly questions. There is no secret. No secret advantages and no, they're not confused tennis players. I'm not going to speak for others, but there could be a multitude of reasons why someone carries several rackets and feel more comfortable doing so. I usually carry 4 in my bag (5 if I am demoing something) -- but believe it or not I can only use one at a time. I usually have 3 of the same racket with a few different string tensions and a fourth for singles/doubles. I've been using 3 VCore 98s -- not all at once, but I will rotate them as the strings wear so that I am not getting rackets restrung as often. It's also good to have backups while 1 or 2 are in the shop getting restrung. I've also kept a VCore 95 as my singles/control racket. 98s too powerful for singles. If you play 3-4 times a week, play in leagues, etc. I think having a few extra sticks is pretty normal. If you do drills once a week at your club, 1 stick is fine.
I played in a sectional tournament last week and a guy showed up to meet up with his team carrying a huge, new Wilson bag PLUS an Adidas shoulder duffle filled up with god only know what. Spare clothes? He also had big bulky headphones on like Serena Williams. All to come play 2 sets. That's a dude I'd like to talk to -- not the guy carrying 3-4 rackets. OR the guy I once played in a USTA doubles match who used a different racket when it was his turn to serve. He put it away after his service game. So, he had a serving racket. Very strange. But, hey, it's all about enjoying the game.
 

glenWs

Rookie
Short answer: it depends.

My favorite subtype of this group is the player who struts out onto the court with 12 freshly strung frames in a giant bag, dressed from head to toe in the latest RF or Nadal gear. For one, I find that whole “shtick” hilarious. For two, IME people like this usually can’t play at the representative level.

The guy or gal who shows up with no bag, a couple mis-matched banged up racquets, shoes with holes in them, coke can for a water bottle…yeah, that’s the type of player to worry about.

Of course there’s a lot of folks out there who just aren’t “married” to any one particular racquet - maybe they like to play different racquets based on who they’re playing or whether they’re playing singles or doubles, or maybe they just like to keep things fresh and interesting by having a few different racquets in the bag. Nothing wrong with that.

Look how often golfers change putters. Miss a few putts and you're out of the bag.
 

Return_Ace

Hall of Fame
Usually have around 6 rackets in my duffle, if not a bit more.

2x matched Gravity Pro's that i use for matches
1x Gravity Pro for practice/training, that i also experiment with strings/weight customisation
1x "generic" racket that i can loan out to friends at club sessions if they break a string or something; currently a Gravity MP.
1-2 other rackets that I'll play with for something different to the GPro's, or in the current case, because i don't like the current GPro weight setup, but am keeping it for a friend to try out first.

Obviously don't need so many rackets, but i own so many to begin with, it's nice to have some options when I'm feeling different, or to remind myself why i shouldn't have switched to any particular racket :laughing:
 

RVT

Rookie
I haven't witnessed this, but tennis is a hobby and some folks like gear. simple as that.

Personally I want all my rackets to be as close as similar as possible and just have multiples in case of string breakage. And I'm not all that "racket sensitive", but it just seems like another variable to worry about. Tennis is complex enough for me.
 

JW10S

Hall of Fame
They are looking for the 'magic wand' that will instantly make them better and suddenly able to hit shots they were never able to hit before.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
Look how often golfers change putters. Miss a few putts and you're out of the bag.
Indeed, a lot of golfers are this way. And not just recreational ones - the pros too. Phil Mickelson comes to mind. OTOH, there are others who rarely, if ever, mess with it - Tiger, Zach Johnson, for example.
 

SVP

Semi-Pro
Because it’s cheaper than buying cars or drugs. I don’t do much match play. I like the different feels of different racquets. I’ve been taking out my old PK Redondo 93 and Pro Staff 85 reissue recently, and I’m happy to say that I still enjoy them. On the other hand, I tried to hit with my old Gamma RZR 100 and I thought my arm was going to fall off, it was so stiff.
 

GummiiBear

Rookie
This year marks the first time in my life buying more than one racquet for my bag. Can I can blame these forums for this? :p I hope to never breach 2 in rotation (ish). My Yonex VCP 97HD is the one I consider to be my racquet right now, and only ever consider one to be my racquet at a time. I still keep my Speed Pro I used last year in my bag, like a bit of a psychological “security blanket”.
 

SeanK

New User
they may just be going through a tennis identity crisis
Woa, so, that's what I have been going through...

Hahah, really though that is what's happening to me. I had a Prestige Mid from the last year of high school when I stopped playing competitively. I had two identical racquets for string breakage, but only needed to keep one since no more competition. I bought a slightly bigger midsize frame in college that was more open string pattern and rotated between the two for weekly tennis sessions. Then, I had a lengthy break and recently started playing two times or so a week and happen to be fairly out of shape, so the two racquets are not working out too well and I am not getting any younger. I got a Prince Textreme Warrior (PD like power) for fairly cheap and quickly found out that it is just a tad it too powerful for my liking. I just got a lighter player racquet this week to see if that'll fill my needs until I get in a better shape. But I will usually start the hitting session with my earlier racquets to see if I can get in a groove with them first.

Is that so wrong?!?!? :cry:
 

Curtennis

Semi-Pro
I’m USTA 3.5 and have tons of different racquets. I simply like collecting things. Tennis racquets bought new keep roughly 50% of their value, bought used they keep basically 90% of their value after you eat shipping.
It’s really not a bad place to park my money with all the fun I get out of it.
 

Hidious

Professional
Let me give you some advice right now: stop visiting these forums and never ever read reviews or customer feedback of a racquet your are interested in. Whenever your game is not perfect and you struggle with your tennis, it sounds, according to the internet, like this and that other frame is amazing and so much better than the one you currently use. More power, more control, more feel, bigger sweet spot, better looking, there is always something that seems like you are missing out on the holy grail. For people that live in places that do not have access to big shops in order to demo racquets, the only way to know is to buy them, bring them to the court and try them (and sometimes mess up their game in the process hehe :p) Ohh and don't get me started on strings and tensions. It's an endless pit and a mental torture.
 

Hidious

Professional
At least one racquet in my bag is there in case the guy I'm playing brought one racquet and he breaks a string -- so we can continue to play. That racquet is always one I don't particularly care about, and usually couldn't be described as "freshly strung."
Haha :D

Also, a huge 6 pack racquet bag is incredibly useful to carry everything: Balls, towels, extra clothes, water, gatorade, overgrips, wristsbands, snacks, ... Now, you can't leave empty racquet slots in a 6 pack bag, can you? Fill it up and show off a little :) You have to deliver the performance afterwards though, or you look like a tool hehe
 

Rozroz

G.O.A.T.
imo just a fancy hobby.
if you can afford it do what you want.
but seems to me, if you find a nice racket that fits you,
no real use piling up all kinds of extra sticks.
it's just a distraction.
play a good game and strokes instead of thinking what other new racket can uplift your game.
 
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