Why do some recreational players have so many racquets??

mtommer

Hall of Fame
No, not old frames. Really fully stringed tennis rackets. A lot of times expensive ones. There has to be an edge it gives them. That's what I'm trying to figure out here.
Barring people who may be demoing racquets and assuming you mean different models when you say "different", what I've found is that there are mostly two camps. The first camp is the player who starts with one racquet and then switches when they "start to play badly", thinking that the switch will help them get back to playing what they perceive as "well". It usually does briefly work but I attribute that mostly to them mentally reenergizing themselves such that they get a brief jolt of energy before it naturally fades away. The other camp consists of those who just like playing around with different racquets, aren't necessarily all that great at tennis, not bad but not great, but who just enjoy hitting around.

As for those of us who use multiples of the same racquet? Well, there are lots of reasons. For example, I'm a very heavy sweater so I'll go through four or five racquets every couple of hours on a very hot day.
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
They/We all believe it is the racquet that makes the difference. Funny, 1st time I saw anyone play tennis they used cutoff brooms. I did not get it. Hope you all do.
 

socallefty

Legend
If you are a string-breaker, you need three racquets at least that are strung similarly for a match. I have had instances where I broke the strings on two racquets in one match because I play with a gut/poly hybrid on a 16x19 racquet and I also play 7-8 times a week - sometimes, one of the racquets in my bag might have broken strings for a couple of days before I have time to take it to my stringer and so, I need at least 2 others. I also like having three racquets because I play singles with the racquet that has the least number of hours on the strings - generally, less than 7-8 hours. I play doubles or do drills with the racquets after 10 hours till the strings break. If I am experimenting with different strings and tensions as I was a couple of years ago, I had a fourth racquet strung with the string or tension I was trying out and I used it only for doing drills and lessons. All my racquets are exactly the same model strung the same way typically and I am not a believer in playing with different kinds of racquets or strings when I am playing matches.
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
If you are a string-breaker, you need three racquets at least that are strung similarly for a match. I have had instances where I broke the strings on two racquets in one match because I play with a gut/poly hybrid on a 16x19 racquet and I also play 7-8 times a week - sometimes, one of the racquets in my bag might have broken strings for a couple of days before I have time to take it to my stringer and so, I need at least 2 others. I also like having three racquets because I play singles with the racquet that has the least number of hours on the strings - generally, less than 7-8 hours. I play doubles or do drills with the racquets after 10 hours till the strings break. If I am experimenting with different strings and tensions as I was a couple of years ago, I had a fourth racquet strung with the string or tension I was trying out and I used it only for doing drills and lessons. All my racquets are exactly the same model strung the same way typically and I am not a believer in playing with different kinds of racquets or strings when I am playing matches.
Broke three racquets on three consecutive RoS! No one would let me use a racquet! Three weeks later broke three strings in three racquets within 45 minutes. Stopped using that racquet and learned to string.
 

onehandbh

Legend
Broke three racquets on three consecutive RoS! No one would let me use a racquet! Three weeks later broke three strings in three racquets within 45 minutes. Stopped using that racquet and learned to string.
I usually bring 3 racquets.
1 Blade Pro that I currently play with.
1 Yonex 95D (my previous racquet. in case other one breaks)
1 Wood racquet (sometimes hit around with it)
 

socallefty

Legend
Most recreational players would do well to invest in a TRX instead of another racquet. It's amazing what a strong core does to one's tennis.
You are assuming that rec players use their core/body rotation when they play tennis. Most of the self-learners just swing with their arms.
 

flanker2000fr

Hall of Fame
You are assuming that rec players use their core/body rotation when they play tennis. Most of the self-learners just swing with their arms.
In that case, they should invest in tennis lessons way ahead of buying new racquets. Then a TRX. Then strings better suited to their game. And only last should they buy a flurry of racquets.
 

Hidious

Professional
When first starting experimenting with strings and tension, having several frames is essential. I remember stringing full poly at 62 lbs in Dunlop 200s because I wanted control and some pros were doing that, so why not.... I had control all right, but depth was another story, not to mention comfort. Switching to another frame with different strings was quite effective and my opponents were suddenly receiving a completely different ball. Ahhh the amount of fresh string jobs I had to put the scissors in after discovering these forums and all the money wasted... good memories.
Same goes for customization. When trying different weight setups, it's not ideal to remove and reapply lead tape in different spots at the courts. Having several frames prepared at home makes the process easier.
 

Kralingen

Legend
Most recreational players would do well to invest in a TRX instead of another racquet. It's amazing what a strong core does to one's tennis.
The few times recently I feel like I have “gotten” tennis and played my best were the times I’ve felt everything through my core. Even if it’s just a psychosomatic cue something about tensing my obliques while hitting has always helped.
 

Bhagi Katbamna

Hall of Fame
I bring at least four. A Pure Strike 100 that I got as a playtest from TW, a Babolat Pure Drive 2015, one head Flexpoint Prestige MP, One Head Youtek Prestige. I usually play with one of the prestiges and then with the other one. Sometimes if my hand gets wet(like today, it was 100 degrees on court) I have to switch rackets because I've broke 3 rackets because they've slipped out of my hand serving.
 

taylor15

Hall of Fame
Barring people who may be demoing racquets and assuming you mean different models when you say "different", what I've found is that there are mostly two camps. The first camp is the player who starts with one racquet and then switches when they "start to play badly", thinking that the switch will help them get back to playing what they perceive as "well". It usually does briefly work but I attribute that mostly to them mentally reenergizing themselves such that they get a brief jolt of energy before it naturally fades away. The other camp consists of those who just like playing around with different racquets, aren't necessarily all that great at tennis, not bad but not great, but who just enjoy hitting around.

As for those of us who use multiples of the same racquet? Well, there are lots of reasons. For example, I'm a very heavy sweater so I'll go through four or five racquets every couple of hours on a very hot day.
Also a heavy sweater. Playing in the 86 degrees and 71 percent humidity that is Georgia right now I rotated three every changeover just so the overgrips would dry out. The guy I was playing made a comment at the first changeover and then saw the saturation when I changed the second. He then understood I think.
I hit with a guy who will never change the one racquet he started with. No hand sweat at all. I’m a bit jealous
 

bluetrain4

G.O.A.T.
I was a racquet junkie back in the day - the 2000s. Got really into specs, trying different frames. Was playing a ton of tennis and it was my first time with the disposable income to experiment. I was under no illusion that there was some elusive "right" frame that would definitively make me a better player. I wasn't on a racquet journey; I liked the frames I had before my junkie phase. I just really enjoyed seeing and experiencing the different feel and characteristics of different frames and how I could adapt my game to them.

Obviously I really only needed two at any given time, but I'd bring more (but not all of them) since I might want to play with a different frame from time to time and often wouldn't make my decision before I went to the courts. Or I might play sets with one frame and then I'd hit around with a different frame afterwards. I don't see the big deal.
 
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flanker2000fr

Hall of Fame
What if I develop my core by doing planks, sit ups, and the like. Then I can use the money I saved by not buying a TRX and get a new racquet instead?
In my experience, TRX is way more challenging. Been using one for the past couple of months (vs. doing planks / sit-ups for the past 25 years), and the difference is noticeable.
 

toby55555

Hall of Fame
Three different rackets at the moment; after years of 4 of the same frame (given to charity shop) I felt the need for more plough through.
Demo for a week or two is worthless, need a few months with different strings.
 

Rozroz

G.O.A.T.
having a few extra rackets of choice in the bag is not the issue here..

the issue is with trying many racket all the time searching for the one that will fit.
i think anyone should settle with a racket that fits his level, fitness and individual abilities (sometimes a coach or a wise person can help).
not so easy to decide because we are always too confused by advertising and endless tweaking,
instead of being focused on just getting better within our limits as rec players.
it might take 1/2 a year for a racket that really fits one's level to dial in, so changing rackets frequently will never really improve what's important.
 
having a few extra rackets of choice in the bag is not the issue here..

the issue is with trying many racket all the time searching for the one that will fit.
i think anyone should settle with a racket that fits his level, fitness and individual abilities (sometimes a coach or a wise person can help).
not so easy to decide because we are always too confused by advertising and endless tweaking,
instead of being focused on just getting better within our limits as rec players.
it might take 1/2 a year for a racket that really fits one's level to dial in, so changing rackets frequently will never really improve what's important.
Truer words were never spoken.
 

ZZdark

New User
4 rackets in my 6 pack bag. 2x VCORE 98 1x PS85 and 1 Babolat Pure Aero VS Tour. I use the 85 to warm up then I switch to the backup VCORE. After that I'll play with the Babolat for fun to get a feel for the higher launch angle and additional power. Then I go back to my favorite VCORE and play out the day.

I think it's unnecessary to bring out more than 5 rackets at a time but if it's what makes you better then more power to you. I used to walk out with 2 rackets but I definitely feel complete with 4.
 
2 or max 3 racquets in the bag:sneaky:
Dont need more.
So...
1 or 2 PT2.0 : same strings and tension. I hate changes
1 PT630 with same strings and tension: for the nostalgic moments:-D
 

Leen

New User
Think some players have their control racket and their power racket. So when things fly out they use their control racket and vice versa.

To me that's like saying I need to put on heavier shoes because I'm running too fast.
 

Rozroz

G.O.A.T.
Think some players have their control racket and their power racket. So when things fly out they use their control racket and vice versa.

To me that's like saying I need to put on heavier shoes because I'm running too fast.
exactly!
 

Winners or Errors

Hall of Fame
Why shouldn't recreational players have a bunch of racquets? Seriously, I've been playing for a long time and rarely get rid of racquets. I don't play for a living and it's fun to play with different sticks. My game doesn't generally suffer when I switch. It's not the arrow, but it's nice to have a fun assortment.
 
Some tennis players I play with come to the court with four to five different racquets. So I guess this is the norm. If it gives you some kind of advantage bringing different racquets to the court, how do you know which different types of racquets to get?
it's fun to play with different models depending on the day
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
I have three Vcore Pro 97 HD because it's a pain to learn new racquets.

I bring two per match in case I break a string. One stays with the stringer.

Once I month I play with my wooden Dunlop Maxply.
Have a pr of SRD-90 & 95 for the same reason
 

romdj

Rookie
Personally, I sweat excessively on the right side, so if I don't bring 4-6 racquets, and we play in humid conditions, you might get me in trouble if the match gets long (I need to switch racquet every 2-4 games in humid/no wind conditions; and changing overgrip doesn't help enough as the grip gets moist if I wait too long :laughing:
 

n80aoag

Rookie
Because we need that dopamine hit every time we buy a new racquet, or see a racquet in multiples stacked together
 

stapletonj

Hall of Fame
2 identical in case of string breakage.
Since I play gut/poly, I like to have a 3rd of the same racket strung with full bed of syngut in case of bad conditions. Will also string that one a little looser in case of arm pain.
IF there is a 4th stick, it is something I have been tinkering with, like say a Clash 100 (I have been playing with a vcore 100 for a few years and the Wilson is trying to seduce me, ha ha)
 

flanker2000fr

Hall of Fame
Personally, I sweat excessively on the right side, so if I don't bring 4-6 racquets, and we play in humid conditions, you might get me in trouble if the match gets long (I need to switch racquet every 2-4 games in humid/no wind conditions; and changing overgrip doesn't help enough as the grip gets moist if I wait too long :laughing:
So you're saying that you're a mutant whose superpowers are to sweat profusely on the right side, while staying dry on the left?
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
The more toys you have the more fun you can have. And it drives your opponents crazy. Eat your heart out @Eddie G

EDIT: Variety is the spice of life.
 

SeeItHitIt

Professional
Ever look in a golfer’s trunk (Or storage locker?). Usually a pile of what look to discarded putters, wedges and drivers. As we all know - it’s the bow, not the Indian, right?
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Ever look in a golfer’s trunk (Or storage locker?). Usually a pile of what look to discarded putters, wedges and drivers. As we all know - it’s the bow, not the Indian, right?
When you’re talking about gold you’re right. Being limited in the clubs you can carry depending on the course, the sand density in the traps, and the speed of the greens you may need different woods, irons, wedges, sand wedges, and putters For different courses.
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
When you’re talking about gold you’re right. Being limited in the clubs you can carry depending on the course, the sand density in the traps, and the speed of the greens you may need different woods, irons, wedges, sand wedges, and putters For different courses.
I just bring extra balls if the course is narrow.

J
 

RelentlessAttack

Hall of Fame
In music we call this phenomenon GAS (Gear Acquisition Syndrome). Always collecting new guitars and pickups and strings and amps and effects and in the end pretty much minimal difference to your end product.

Tennis, I find the difference is even less. I used the same racquet for 10 years and recently switched to a new one. In the demoing process, I found that the racquets would often feel drastically different but the actual end product in matches was pretty much always the same.
 

10S-Junkie

Rookie
In music we call this phenomenon GAS (Gear Acquisition Syndrome). Always collecting new guitars and pickups and strings and amps and effects and in the end pretty much minimal difference to your end product.

Tennis, I find the difference is even less. I used the same racquet for 10 years and recently switched to a new one. In the demoing process, I found that the racquets would often feel drastically different but the actual end product in matches was pretty much always the same.
On TTW we call it "Racketaholicism" :sneaky:
 
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