Why does someone like Roddick fade and retire, the Big 3 not?

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Was there any other player who played Novak Djokovic more than a few times yet has a winning record against him? Marat Safin has a 2-0 record against Novak, but that is only two meetings. ARod has 5-4 record vs Novak but had lost the last 2 matches (to the Djoker). He had not beaten Novak since 2010. Could not allow ND to even it up so he had to retire.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
What does that mean “like Roddick?” Aside from his serve, there was nothing remarkable about him. He certainly could have played longer but he wouldn’t be winning anything.
Andy was a very athletic player and had a pretty decent Fh. His banana shot rivaled Rafa's. He also demonstrated that he could be very mentally tough. The 2009 Wimbledon final is a great example of that. Andy broke Roger's serve twice in the first 4 sets. It took Roger 4.25 hours (77 games total) to finally break Andy. And ARod was serving second in the 30-game 5th set... so he was constantly under pressure to even it up or lose the match.

Roddick remained in the ATP top 10 for nearly all of a decade of play. Very few other pro players have ever done that. 36 ATP titles to his name. He was winning nearly 3/4 of his singles matches... 74.4% slam singles and 74.2% of all singles matches. If he had retired in 2011 after his shoulder injuries returned and he had fallen out of the top 10, his win % would have been greater than 3/4.
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
For those who talk about PEDS: when these are used within a sport, it's not only a few players and definitely not only the top 3. If there are PEDs in tennis, then a lot of players are taking them (probably a majority), including among the older ones. So Federer, Nadal and Djokovic would still be on top due to their higher ability - whether there are PEDs or not.
Not true. The more successful athletes have more money and therefore can afford the best doping doctors available.
 

Goret

Rookie
Not true. The more successful athletes have more money and therefore can afford the best doping doctors available.
It's not like everyone would be clean except the Top 3.
Rank 10-20 players would earn > $2 million a year if I'm not wrong; rank 4-9 for sure even more (> $4 million a year). This seems sufficient, to me, to afford good-enough doctors and PEDs... I don't think a top-notch doctor would make a stellar difference, compared to a "good enough" one; and I don't think there are unaffordable classified products that only the very wealthiest would be able to get. From what's been seen elsewhere, PEDs products are similar at a given time, in a given sport. Better doctors could help optimize it, but wouldn't be sufficient to explain the destruction inflicted by the Big Three on everybody else.
 

upchuck

Professional
Question could be asked of Serena as well. Why is she still making slam finals while Henin, Clijsters, Ivanovic and a whole host of other women have been long gone?

There is something to be said about being freakishly good at your chosen sport, and Federer, Nadal, Djokovic and Serena all fit the bill. Their longevity is causing us to reimagine what it means to be GOATs because it shows you either have "it" or you don't.
 

duaneeo

Hall of Fame
With the LostGens, no breakthrough from the NextGens, and a mentally fragile Federer, Roddick's chances of winning Wimbledon would be great if he were still in the game.
 

Bhagi Katbamna

Hall of Fame
He injured his should playing Cilic in the Australian Open one year. He was 2 sets to 0 down, kept playing when he should have tanked or quit, won the next two sets and then lost the 5th. He did permanent damage to his shoulder and then wasn't the same after.
 

killerboss

New User
Get him back out there as a legacy player. He can still win matches at slam level (especially Wimbledon) for sure, given the state of the weak tour. They need to start offering incentives to seniors to get them out there training and competing in slams again.
 

NatF

Bionic Poster
He wasn't an insane genetic freak, he had injury issues and didn't love the game enough like say Hewitt to keep playing as lowly ranked pro.
 

Enga

Hall of Fame
Didnt Roddick himself say he was tired of waking up with shoulder pain? I suspect that has something to do with it.
 

ron schaap

Professional
Because he is not top 3 consistent like the real top 3. And because he was only good at serving, which does not make him even a minor goat.
 

Zetty

Professional
What does that mean “like Roddick?” Aside from his serve, there was nothing remarkable about him. He certainly could have played longer but he wouldn’t be winning anything.
He's got 32 career titles, you can't be anything but a troll.
 

Roddick85

Hall of Fame
I think the thing that really pushed him into retirement was the recurrent injuries, most notably the shoulder. When you look at Roddick's last few years on tour, his last great run at a slam was that heartbreaking loss to Federer at Wimbledon 2009, and then he won his last MS-1000 against Berdych in Miami the following year. After that it was pretty much a steady decline which was painful to watch as he's one of my favorite players. He suffered from shoulder injuries for a few years, having to take time off then comeback on tour and I think that every comeback became harder and harder for him as his ranking declined and he had a hard time beating the players he faced in the early rounds which became frustrating. While I always thought he had an underrated ground game and a great forehand at some point, his amazing serve was his bread & butter and anyone who's played tennis at a decent level and suffered from shoulder injuries will tell you how much havoc it wreaks on one's serve. The other aspects of his game just weren't strong enough to offset his reduced serving capabilities. When you look back, Roddick was seen as the guy who would carry the torch for American tennis once Sampras & Agassi retired and if you judge him strictly on that, he came up short. However, with 32 ATP titles including a slam, 5 slam finals, 5 MS-1000 and a short stint as #1, I think that it's only fair to say he's had a great career that only a select few will ever surpass and he was still a great presence for American tennis. I wish he would've stayed a few years more and get another shot at a slam, but health comes first as there's life after tennis and being healthy makes it much more enjoyable, I think no one can disagree on that.
 
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