Why is Golf given more priority than Tennis ? Is it really more popular than Tennis? Do you like it ?

1stVolley

Professional
Aha! Wow, she is light for a Dutch. Maybe just the pic but I don't see much of the Brindle-ing that typically distinguishes the Dutchies from the Mals.

I love them both, had a Malinois for 8 years, my brother had a Dutch and now breeds top-flight Mals for sport and protection work.

I personally would have left her named Pixie just for giggles.

Mine was named, apropos of our venue...Roger.
Dutchies and Malinois are two terrific breeds. One extra nice thing about Dutchies is that the AKC does not recognize this breed, so their gene pool hasn't been corrupted by inbreeding for show. I certainly wouldn't want to be on the receiving end of a protection trained Dutch or Malinois.
 
Golf is a dream for marketing. The demographic with the biggest disposable income is getting older and not playing tennis. They are playing golf. I personally wouldn't waste the time to play golf.
 
D

Deleted member 768841

Guest
Here's why golf is popular.

It enables old rich people to pretend they're into sport.

The only golf stories I like are about poker players betting ridiculous amount of money while playing golf.
Michael Jordan? Him and most OG basketball players love golf.
15-charles-barkley-golf-swing-1-charles-barkley-gifs.gif
Ahem.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Golf is no longer Americentric. 19 of the last 40 major winners hail from other countries. The Ryder Cup pits USA vs Europe and Europe has won 8 of the last 12 biennial team contests. USA still dominates The Presidents Cup that pits USA vs non-Euro Internationals (11-1-1) every other year. Slacker Aussie/South Africans need to take charge!
 

Rosstour

G.O.A.T.
Suki definitely has a brindle coat; the pic doesn't bring that out. However, I think she has some Whippet in her because her legs are exceptionally long and slim and her chest is extra deep. She only weights 42 lbs, too.

You're kidding about the Whippet thing I assume. That's just a speedy Dutch/Mal build, the French Ring guys tend to favor those smaller ones due to their insane agility, where the Schutzhund and KNPV guys like the bigger ones. Mine was 75-ish.

Dutchies and Malinois are two terrific breeds. One extra nice thing about Dutchies is that the AKC does not recognize this breed, so their gene pool hasn't been corrupted by inbreeding for show. I certainly wouldn't want to be on the receiving end of a protection trained Dutch or Malinois.

Agreed. I started out wanting a Dutch but they are so freaking hard to find and there was a Malinois breeder within an hour of my house.

You just reminded me of this. Here I am on the receiving end of a Dutchie called "Sniper" who I think achieved some pretty good results in French Ring, owned by a guy named Jason Davis.

 
D

Deleted member 769694

Guest
Scratch that

 

Hitman

Bionic Poster
Imagine a tennis player like Shooter Mcgavin.

maybe Tennys Sandgren

Shooter McGavin actor actually now has a free lifetime pass at various golf clubs around the US due to Happy Gilmore fame.

Here's a little more trivia for you.

The character portrayed by Carl Weathers has a wooden right arm...that is a tribute to the Dillon character that Carl Weathers plays in Predator, where Predator blasts his right arm off. :)
 

Federer and Del Potro

Talk Tennis Guru
Shooter McGavin actor actually now has a free lifetime pass at various golf clubs around the US due to Happy Gilmore fame.

Here's a little more trivia for you.

The character portrayed by Carl Weathers has a wooden right arm...that is a tribute to the Dillon character that Carl Weathers plays in Predator, where Predator blasts his right arm off. :)
That’s awesome lol. He did a great job. Just a good actor in general I’ve seen him in quite a bit and he is very versatile in his ability to do different roles.
 

Federer and Del Potro

Talk Tennis Guru
Shooter - "I eat pieces of ****$ like you for breakfast!"

Happy - "You eat pieces of **** for breakfast?"

Shooter - "That's not what I meant..."

:-D
That was the exact scene I thought of when I thought of Sandgren. I can see Sandgren saying that to someone at a Wimbledon club brunch.
 

1stVolley

Professional
You're kidding about the Whippet thing I assume. That's just a speedy Dutch/Mal build, the French Ring guys tend to favor those smaller ones due to their insane agility, where the Schutzhund and KNPV guys like the bigger ones. Mine was 75-ish.



Agreed. I started out wanting a Dutch but they are so freaking hard to find and there was a Malinois breeder within an hour of my house.

You just reminded me of this. Here I am on the receiving end of a Dutchie called "Sniper" who I think achieved some pretty good results in French Ring, owned by a guy named Jason Davis.

Actually, Suki's veterinarian thought she might have some whippet, too. But maybe you're right. Suki was very agile and could catch anything in the air. Now, at 14 1/2 years, the squirrels just dis her.

Sniper did a nice takedown of you. I noticed that afterward she went after your leg. I guess she knew you didn't have a weapon in your hand so she didn't bother to commence removing an arm.
 

WestboroChe

Hall of Fame
I haven’t played golf much since I was in high school when I played occasionally and took some lessons. I actually enjoy watching it on TV. Watching it live sucks though. You have two choices. Find a spot to camp and watch different players play the same shot over and over again or move around and keep hoping find a good view of the action every few minutes.
 

Zetty

Hall of Fame
It's a better sport in old age, and literally anyone can play athleticism is completely unnecessary, so I get the appeal.
 

Rocket54

New User
It's ridiculous, isn't it?

Just look at any professional player, and you will see that their parents were in the top 1% of earners in their country.

The profile of a pro tennis player is invariably upper-middle class and concomitantly well-educated and accomplished.

I'd even argue that golf is more accessible for the average person than tennis.
Not here in Australia.
 

SonnyT

Legend
Major trends all are going against tennis: aging populations, and over-weight populations. With these trends, it's downright dangerous for more and more people to start or continue tennis.

And the young people would rather take up team sports, where there can be teamwork and camaraderie.
 

WestboroChe

Hall of Fame
Golf is no longer Americentric. 19 of the last 40 major winners hail from other countries. The Ryder Cup pits USA vs Europe and Europe has won 8 of the last 12 biennial team contests. USA still dominates The Presidents Cup that pits USA vs non-Euro Internationals (11-1-1) every other year. Slacker Aussie/South Africans need to take charge!
But that also means 21 of the last 40 majors were won by Americans. I’d say that’s more America centric than the current ATP situation where American men can’t even sniff a major title.
 

clout

Hall of Fame
Tennis definitely requires a lot more athletic ability but anyone that says golf is easy or doesn’t require skill clearly hasn’t tried playing golf.....
 

1HBHfanatic

Legend
I haven’t played golf much since I was in high school when I played occasionally and took some lessons. I actually enjoy watching it on TV. Watching it live sucks though. You have two choices. Find a spot to camp and watch different players play the same shot over and over again or move around and keep hoping find a good view of the action every few minutes.

-wow. i see what you are saying!!
-for the life of me, i cannot watch golf on tv!,, watching live is even more torture by your description
-ill play golf 1or2/year
-i told myself, when my knees give out, ill provably take up golf, but not before
-too much of a time commitment, 5-10hours on a golf course, no thanks
 

WestboroChe

Hall of Fame
-wow. i see what you are saying!!
-for the life of me, i cannot watch golf on tv!,, watching live is even more torture by your description
-ill play golf 1or2/year
-i told myself, when my knees give out, ill provably take up golf, but not before
-too much of a time commitment, 5-10hours on a golf course, no thanks
What I like about watching it on TV is that you put it on and follow the action through the day while you’re go about whatever you’re doing. They keep moving around from hole to hole as certain players push up the board or choke and you get to see all the great shots or misses. And since there is a lot downtime between shots in real time you just get continuous “action”. You get to second guess their choices and wonder at their skills.

At the same time you get to see these beautiful golf courses in your living room and unlike tennis ir doesn’t demand your constant attention.

In some ways I prefer watching golf to tennis. Even though I much prefer to play tennis.
 

WestboroChe

Hall of Fame
Tennis definitely requires a lot more athletic ability but anyone that says golf is easy or doesn’t require skill clearly hasn’t tried playing golf.....
Golf and tennis are both very hard. But tennis is definitely a better workout. But requires a lot of calculating and if form is important in tennis it’s critical in golf. If you don’t have good form in golf you simply can’t play. Whereas in tennis raw athleticism can make up for lack of form and tactical awareness. (See Monfils).
 

ollinger

G.O.A.T.
Golf is for people who can’t play tennis.

have played plenty of both, much more difficult to become a good golfer than a good tennis player. Everyone I know personally who is a good athlete and has really worked relentlessly at both games became a much better tennis player than golfer.
 

Jack the Hack

Hall of Fame
Just personal anecdotes, but when I was in high school, one of the local golf courses was offering free lessons to kids under 18. My Mom had dated a pro golfer when she was younger and thought it would be a good lifetime "upward mobility" sport for me, so she tried to get me interested in the lessons, which I turned down. As someone who ran track/cross country, played basketball, and excelled at tennis on my own, I thought golf was immensely boring and un-athletic.

Later, when I was going to college, my school had their own golf course, which was free for students to play on. Again, my Mom encouraged me to take that opportunity to play. However, in my 4 years there, I didn't play one round - but I did run on the course a few times and my dorm did a round of capture the flag at night there once before security ran us off.

When I got married, it turned out that my wife was a good golfer and she worked at a golf course for awhile. As her spouse, I was allowed free use of the range and the course, which I utilized a few times with her, but it didn't catch my interest. My wife and I did a few vacations where we played golf together and it was fun driving around in the cart together and making a mess of nice courses. I wasn't until about 10 years later, when I was in my early 30s, that I started actually liking the game and practicing on a regular basis. So much so, that I built a small green and sandtrap on my property where I could pitch balls from my back deck and practice recoveries and putting. One year of that short game practice was huge because if I could get within 100 yards of a hole, I was pretty solid about getting down within 3 shots or less. So as long as I could keep my drives and layup shots straight, I could pretty much shoot in the low 80s consistently. My official handicap was a 12 (meaning that on an average par 72 course, I would shoot an 84). My best round ever was an 80 on a very tough course, and I think once finished 4-over on an 18 hole executive course (which was mostly par 3 holes with a couple par 4s).

Being able to play golf turned out to be a big thing at work in terms of shmoozing with the boss and vendors. Through my job, I was able to play the Ritz Carlton course at Half Moon Bay, Pumpkin Ridge in Oregon (just a couple days after the women's US Open was completed there, so I saw how tough they set up the course for a pro event), and the most impressive of all... the Old Course at St Andrews in Scotland!

The St Andrews opportunity was completely unplanned. I was in Scotland for a month for a work project and we had a couple days off to explore. It was early March and we got a very unusually sunny day that was about 55 degrees, so my co-worker, my wife, my very young son, and I all rented a car and drove over to St Andrews. After walking around the town a bit and checking out the beach (where the opening scene of Chariots of Fire was filmed), we wandered over to the golf course. We fully expected that it would be all locked up for commoners like us and we would be escorted away. Instead, when we went into the clubhouse, we were welcomed by an older gentleman that said (in a very heavy Scottish accent) "wouldja' like ta play sum golf taday?" Turns out, being in the middle of the week and still in winter, there was almost nobody there! So for 70 pounds each, we were given rental clubs and set free to play anywhere on the Old Course we wanted. And I have to say, it was a magical day! That is the birthplace of golf, which was invented by the poor and common people for entertainment, and once banned by the King of Scotland (who was worried that they would be wasting their time instead of working). To me, it was almost like going to the All England club, having them hand us racquets and say "Centre Court is this way, play all you want." I have great memories of my wife almost hitting a hole-in-one on one of the par 3s, getting impossibly stuck in one of the pot bunkers (and just throwing my ball out), and carrying my son around when he got tired of it all.

Ironically, it was just a couple years after that experience in Scotland that I got back into tennis after a 5 year break. I had played tennis and was #1 on my high school and small college teams. I also played Open tournaments, got ranked inside the top 25 in my Section, coached college and high school tennis for a couple seasons, and did an internship where I ran a small professional tournament and helped out at the USTA for a year. However, I got burned out from all of this and was dealing with some nagging tennis injuries, which caused me to step away from the game. I also ended up focusing way more on my career in IT, which was much more lucrative for my family than any tennis related pursuits. But just before I turned 35, I got a USTA Section yearbook in the mail that listed all of the final rankings for everyone. To my surprise, one of the guys I knew well from my earlier playing days had a top 50 national ranking. I thought, geez, if that guy can do that, so can I! So I started playing tennis again and have hardly looked back. At this point, I only play golf a few times a year, and usually with my wife, on a cheap nearby course or on vacation.

Like my Mom did, I also tried to get both my son and daughter interested in golf... or at least give them the opportunity to try it to see if it caught. But like me when I was younger, both of them thought it was really boring and prefer running and tennis instead. So I think that is probably the golf story for many people. It isn't something that most young people care about, but as you get older, you get roped in through work or social playing opportunities. And that is really the target market for golf advertisers - the mid-career and older demographic that has lots of extra money for luxury items and experiences. In it's height, the Tiger Woods story captured a lot of the public attention, but since he has faded, the popularity of the game has drifted back to it's usual fanbase.
 

tom-selleck

Professional
golf has at least 3 big things over tennis for general interest.............. tennis has some things over golf for sure too

1) i can play tiger woods in a match.......... can't do that with tennis.

2) variety of locales/scenery etc...... i do think tennis should promote some of its more interesting courts. there's one at resort in italy near portofino that looks interesting.

3) you don't have to be in shape to play golf
 

WestboroChe

Hall of Fame
Just an aside. Since the club is closed and most people I know are not comfortable playing tennis yet I bought a $3 pitching wedge on the bay and using a practice turf I set up a “golf” course in my backyard using soccer training cones as targets. Not as fun as tennis but it’s something to do outside.
 

Enga

Hall of Fame
Golf, aside from being a rich mans sport with a large variety of tools available to the player, is nothing like tennis. It is a solo sport, where the play of other players has no affect on the outcome. It is a sport where you do not directly compete.

It is instead more comparable to darts.
 

THUNDERVOLLEY

G.O.A.T.
In the US, I think that some of this is tied to the fortunes of the male American players. Golf had/has: Tiger, Phil, Jordan Spieth, Brooks Koepka. Tennis? Roddick, Isner, Sock, Opelka.

American tennis has not been tied or relying on male players since the end of Sampras' career. No one cared about Roddick and certainly not Isner and the rest of those no-talents. American women were the tennis players who earned high TV ratings (the sport's largest audience), and in the case of the Williams sisters, were revolutionary and popular beyond the sport. Even recent American women (e.g. Stephens) who won majors had more attention (and that means more ad revenue) than the go-nowhere men.
 
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