why is the net lower in the middle?

DarthMaul

Professional
Sorry, I couldn't concentrate at all while reading your post. Your avatar is absolutely frightening. I literally thought that if I took my eyes off of it, it would attack me. I think I would rather come across the Joker from the Dark Knight in an alley than Darth Maul
LOL! The character is Darth Maul from Star Wars and he's indeed the most frightening character in the movie.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2A4fN7FEzjc

If you want to read the post without being scared, try to copy/paste my post in Notepad ;)
 
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kuhdlie

Rookie
this must be one of the only sports where something is not straight on purpose. e.g. you don't have bent nets in table tennis, volleyball, badminton, or bent soccer goal posts, etc...
 

jimbo333

Hall of Fame
Actually I think it varies by location... in Wimbledon the net is basically draped over the court, letting netcords bounce short and low, whereas at the US Open it's tight, and causes netcords to bounce high and long.
I now realise that you havn't got a clue what you are talking about!

And I was right, the reason is historical, no more needs to be said on the matter:)
 

Nanshiki

Hall of Fame
Well, I don't really think that the OP was comparing the grand slams. As a guideline, as it is quoted in the rulebook, the way I posted it is the way to get the proper tension on a net.

Comment 1.1:
How do you tighten the net to the proper tension?

First, loosen the center strap. Next, tighten the net cord until the center of the
net is approximately 40 inches above the ground. Finally, tighten the center
strap until the center of the net is 36 inches above the ground. These
measurements should always bemade before the day’s firstmatch and when
possible before each match.
A guideline is a guideline is a guideline.

Note that it says "approximately" 40 inches. A difference of two inches in either direction could make the net very tight or very loose. The same thing goes for net cords that have different levels of elasticity.
 
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woodrow1029

Guest
A guideline is a guideline is a guideline.

Note that it says "approximately" 40 inches. A difference of two inches in either direction could make the net very tight or very loose. The same thing goes for net cords that have different levels of elasticity.
Approximately 40 inches does not mean 38 or 42. It says approximately so that if you feel that the net cord is going to snap, stop before getting it to that point.
 

Nanshiki

Hall of Fame
Approximately means to estimate, as opposed to measure. No person would be able to get it to within two inches or so without measuring. Hell, I can't even tell if a net is off unless it's off by more than a full inch or two... unless I'm having problem with a lot of cord hits.

Also keep in mind that all the slams are run by different organizations, so the guidelines and training being used are all going to be a little different.
 
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woodrow1029

Guest
You have just clarified Jimbo333's statement a few posts ago.
 

jms007

Professional
I don't think it's because of physics. Maybe it WAS and it stuck around as a standard, but surely they can make a straight net out of other materials. Our asphalt court had a net made out of fence wire, and it was totally straight.
 

martini1

Hall of Fame
Remember tennis is a very old game without a lot of science back then. I think it's just the weight of the net itself naturally the middle is going to be dropped a little. Over time when they make the "official" rule they just measured the net again in the #1 country club of the time and decided this was how it is measured.

I could be wrong but purposely designing a v shape net for no material reason back in the days seems a bit odd.
 
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