Why is there a trend towards dampening feel?

pow

Hall of Fame
#1
I have the pre-cortex pure drive and aeropro and every generation since then has added another dampening technology from cortex to dampened materials. Wilson has countervail and it's been a general trend for most companies to go for a dampened feel.
Does anyone enjoy the dampened feel more? Is it because the companies are using cheaper materials and less feel is a byproduct? Why is most manufacturers trending towards less feel in their racquets?
 
#3
Feel is soo subjective and on the other hand who needs the feel nowadays when the game is bombing from the base line ? Just a rhetorical question.
 
#5
Many young players like the feel of dead rackets. Also, people want to be able to hit harder with lighter rackets, which is uncomfortable for two reasons. In order to make a light racket powerful, generally, it needs to be stiff. And if you are going to hit harder, the ball is going to come back harder. Many players feel that a dampened racket feels more stable.
 
#8
I have the pre-cortex pure drive and aeropro and every generation since then has added another dampening technology from cortex to dampened materials. Wilson has countervail and it's been a general trend for most companies to go for a dampened feel.
Does anyone enjoy the dampened feel more? Is it because the companies are using cheaper materials and less feel is a byproduct? Why is most manufacturers trending towards less feel in their racquets?
I think these racquet companies just watch each other. If one comes out with something, then the others try and jump on the bandwagon. They just chase waves, snake oils, and rabbit trails.
 
#9
Companies recognized destroying middle aged players elbows wasn't good business practice and have been working diligently to offer tweeners with better comfort but still that sense of power and spin. Feel has become a dinosaur in tennis. Just a few of us old guys around that prefer that kind of frame.
 
#10
Companies recognized destroying middle aged players elbows wasn't good business practice and have been working diligently to offer tweeners with better comfort but still that sense of power and spin. Feel has become a dinosaur in tennis. Just a few of us old guys around that prefer that kind of frame.
I agree with you on companies like Prince and Pro Kennex who are very mindful of arm health.
 
#14
Anyway, not so much lack of feel in today's racquets, as I see more companies today going the matte finish route, which to me, makes a racquet have more feel....maybe it's just me.
 

pow

Hall of Fame
#16
Does dampening feel actually help with stiffness? My understanding is 70 stiffness in two frames are going to have the same effect on your elbow regardless of dampening material.
 
#19
Companies recognized destroying middle aged players elbows wasn't good business practice
90% of rec players still didn’t recognize playing with ****ty technique and arming the ball with a 350g frame (because someone on ttw said it’s cool) is the real reason they have arm issues. Companies just saw the opportunity to sell these people “arm friendly” racquets and make more money, good for them
 
#20
90% of rec players still didn’t recognize playing with ****ty technique and arming the ball with a 350g frame (because someone on ttw said it’s cool) is the real reason they have arm issues. Companies just saw the opportunity to sell these people “arm friendly” racquets and make more money, good for them
Bad technique is def the #1 contributor to TE
 
#21
Olden day graphite had shorter coarser strands that gave a more muted feel. Modern hm graphite in racquets is stronger and stiffer with longer strands, and because its stronger i believe they need less of it in a layup.... less mass plus stiffer layup means more vibes. Sounds good to me?!
 
#23
Bad technique is def the #1 contributor to TE
Age and frequency of play are probably the top contributors. Technique probably next in line. Then equipment.

But it’s pretty hard to alter ingrained technique. Can’t change your age. You can always give up the sport, but what fun is that?

Easiest factor to fix is equipment.
 
#24
Twenty-year-olds already have problems with TE and on the other hand seventy-year-olds play without problems.

When you decide on this beautiful game, regardless of age, I recommend that you minimize the amount of budget for equipment and invest the difference in the good coach. And of course, physical condition, warming-up before a game, etc. also very important to avoid injuries. I see the dudes that come to the court and start right away from the baseline, of course full power.
 

pow

Hall of Fame
#27
I wish manufacturers would stop this trend. I am not a fan of the dampened feel and don't know many who are either. A lot of the newer TW video racquet reviews complain about feeling disconnected from the ball on contact.
 
#29
Twenty-year-olds already have problems with TE and on the other hand seventy-year-olds play without problems.

When you decide on this beautiful game, regardless of age, I recommend that you minimize the amount of budget for equipment and invest the difference in the good coach
. And of course, physical condition, warming-up before a game, etc. also very important to avoid injuries. I see the dudes that come to the court and start right away from the baseline, of course full power.
Anecdotes are not science. Studies clearly show that the incidence of all tendinopathies increase with age and frequency of activity.

I could point out dozens of players with bad form showing no evidence of TE. Just like we can point out the 90 year old smoker with no cancer.

Bad technique is probably important but hard to gather evidence for since it’s hard to define.
Age, hours per week playing, Racquet RA are all quantifiable variables that you can at least get more evidence for. Although I doubt you’ll ever see the Racquet industry sponsor an equipment based study.
 
#30
Brands like Volkl, Pacific, Prince and Dunlop have done a great job in retaining feel and comfort. Maybe the current Volkl V Feel range is a bit less comfortable, hope they fix that with the next range. Pro Kennex maximise the comfort aspect and their current Q Plus tour range and have now also engineered feel as we'll so I would look at these brands. Yonex and Angell also have good feel and comfort.
Babolat in my opinion has been way too stiff and harsh and the cortex does mute it somewhat but it's still not great. Head's graphene technology is also quite unforgiving. Wilson conterveil does enhance comfort but then they went and made their frames stiffer at the same time so that sought of cancelled out the good work they did with the CV ( E.g Burn, a Ultra 100) . Probably the Ultra Tour 97 that doesn't have CV feels better with its lower RA and box beam construction. Will wait for the 98 Clash before I comment on that .
 
#31
Yes
Since you're so damn smart, I'm waiting to hear an explanation from you of why you think a glossy finish vs a matte finish has more feel, or if a racquet has either, glossy or matte, it doesn't affect "perceived" feel.

Here's why I believe matte finish does allow for more feel.

Matte finish is a flat finish. It's like touching raw carbon braid that hasn't been painted over.

A glossy finish on the other hand, creates sort of another layer on top of the paint, which is on top of the racquet. More layers.

Like when your wife puts on makeup, if you have one. Or maybe you put makeup on. Idk. But it is a layer on top of something else.

Why people use thin or leather grips......for more feel. There is less between their hands and the actual tool. Does your little brain understand what I'm talking about....?



Schools out Johnny. Go home. Play with yourself. I don't really care. Just get out of my class.
 
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#33
Yes
Since you're so damn smart, I'm waiting to hear an explanation from you of why you think a glossy finish vs a matte finish has more feel, or if a racquet has either, glossy or matte, it doesn't affect "perceived" feel.

Here's why I believe matte finish does allow for more feel.

Matte finish is a flat finish. It's like touching raw carbon braid that hasn't been painted over.

A glossy finish on the other hand, creates sort of another layer on top of the paint, which is on top of the racquet. More layers.

Like when your wife puts on makeup, if you have one. Or maybe you put makeup on. Idk. But it is a layer on top of something else.

Why people use thin or leather grips......for more feel. There is less between their hands and the actual tool. Does your little brain understand what I'm talking about....?



Schools out Johnny. Go home. Play with yourself. I don't really care. Just get out of my class.
I have had PT10 with glossy and I’ve had PT10 in matte paint and I can tell you they played exactly the same. You have to compare sameness. You have never compared racquets with the same mold and layup but different paint finishes. In addition I have Graphite Edge’s in glossy paint and in matte paint. They still play the same. It’s the layup. It’s the materials used and how they are used that effects how a racquet played. It’s more tactile feel of holding the racquet as to which you like better.
 
#34
Does dampening feel actually help with stiffness? My understanding is 70 stiffness in two frames are going to have the same effect on your elbow regardless of dampening material.
I guess one feeling more dampened would have less effect on elbow than feels less dampened given the same stiffness. Isn't it the definition of dampening, reducing impact?
 
#35
I agree that the goal for adding vibration dampening materials to the racquet has been a result of stiffer&lighter racquets as well as popularity of polyester strings.

Not sure if it’s still common practice but for a while putting silicone or cotton balls in the racquet handle was popular to dampen frame vibration. Also silicone can reduce swing weight.

OP:
When you say feel are you talking about feedback or responsiveness? Personally I think modern racquets have plenty of both. Feedback for where you are hitting on the racquet. (Bad vibration when miss hit and pure feel when hit sweet spot). Responsiveness as in being able to control your shot at will. I think modern stiffer frames have more responsiveness.
 

Gee

Hall of Fame
#37
I agree that the goal for adding vibration dampening materials to the racquet has been a result of stiffer&lighter racquets as well as popularity of polyester strings.

Not sure if it’s still common practice but for a while putting silicone or cotton balls in the racquet handle was popular to dampen frame vibration. Also silicone can reduce swing weight.

OP:
When you say feel are you talking about feedback or responsiveness? Personally I think modern racquets have plenty of both. Feedback for where you are hitting on the racquet. (Bad vibration when miss hit and pure feel when hit sweet spot). Responsiveness as in being able to control your shot at will. I think modern stiffer frames have more responsiveness.
Adding weight always increases swing weight. It only makes a frame more maneuverable when you lower the balance point. At least when the swingweight will not be too high for the player.
 
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