Why isn't Ferrer playing the Australian Open?

I just don't understand why he'd fly all the way to Australia for the Hopman Cup and not stick around long enough to put in a farewell appearance at a major event. I just don't understand why he's winding down his career with exhibitions and challengers and not more meaningful tournaments. It reminds me of Becker from mid-1997 through early-1999, and he eventually realized that was a mistake and played one final Wimbledon.
 

Mainad

Bionic Poster
I just don't understand why he'd fly all the way to Australia for the Hopman Cup and not stick around long enough to put in a farewell appearance at a major event. I just don't understand why he's winding down his career with exhibitions and challengers and not more meaningful tournaments. It reminds me of Becker from mid-1997 through early-1999, and he eventually realized that was a mistake and played one final Wimbledon.
He made the decision to retire last August and said the 2018 USO would be his last appearance at a Slam (he played Nadal in his opening match but unfortunately had to retire). He has said he will play a few selected tournaments in 2019 finishing his career on home turf at one of the Spanish events (Barcelona or Madrid).
 
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tacou

G.O.A.T.
He made the decision to retire last August and said the 2018 USO would be his last appearance at a Slam (he played Nadal in his opening match but unfortunately had to retire). He has said he will play a few selected tournaments in 2019 finishing his career on home turf at one of the Spanish events (Barcelona or Madrid).
I get this but OP’s point still stands. He went all the way to Australia, why not let himself finish his last match at a major instead of retire?
 
He made the decision to retire last August and said the 2018 USO would be his last appearance at a Slam (he played Nadal in his opening match but unfortunately had to retire). He has said he will play a few selected tournaments in 2019 finishing his career on home turf at one of the Spanish events (Barcelona or Madrid).
I know what he said, but my question is about why. As @tacou agrees, the decision doesn't really make much sense.
 

DSH

Hall of Fame
Lol almost forgot about this. Yet he is described in this thread as a "beautiful competitor." What a joke.
him and del potro are, strangely, recognized as examples of sportsmanship.
at least in this forum they seem to have high approval in that regard.
 

George Turner

Hall of Fame
I just don't understand why he'd fly all the way to Australia for the Hopman Cup and not stick around long enough to put in a farewell appearance at a major event. I just don't understand why he's winding down his career with exhibitions and challengers and not more meaningful tournaments. It reminds me of Becker from mid-1997 through early-1999, and he eventually realized that was a mistake and played one final Wimbledon.
That was a highly expensive Wimbledon for Boris, in more ways than one. :-D
 
The world No.125 Spaniard, who at age 36 says he can no longer compete for extended periods, will retire from pro tennis at Madrid in May.
https://hopmancup.com/2019/01/fan-favourite-ferrer-ends-on-a-high-note/
Again, we are discussing the reasons for the decision, not what the decision is. If he is fit enough to play three Hopman Cup matches and still end up with a victory over Lucas Pouille in a long match, he is fit enough to play a match or few at the Australian Open as a more high-profile sendoff.
 

DSH

Hall of Fame
Again, we are discussing the reasons for the decision, not what the decision is. If he is fit enough to play three Hopman Cup matches and still end up with a victory over Lucas Pouille in a long match, he is fit enough to play a match or few at the Australian Open as a more high-profile sendoff.

you are kinda slow isnt it?
 
1997 lost to Sampras

1999 lost to Rafter. F***ed someone in a cupboard. Lost his marriage and loads of his money till he went bankrupt.

I'd say the 1999 one was more costly.
Well, yeah. On the other hand:

1997: got thrashed by Sampras. Freaked out about not being as good as Sampras on grass and so retired prematurely. Lost his career and loads of future earnings potential when he was still arguably the #2 player in the world on faster surfaces (after the injury at Wimbledon 1996, he played some of his best tennis in fall 1996 in the indoor season).
 

EloQuent

G.O.A.T.
He probably doesn't want to go through qualies. Even Groth wasn't given a retirement WC, they are meant for up and coming players.
 
you are kinda slow isnt it?
Yet again, reporting a decision ad nauseam DOES NOT provide reasons for it. The thread title is not, "What? Ferrer's not playing the Australian Open?" Until you know the difference between what and why, you might want to avoid calling others slow.

Nothing in the video link explains the decision in a way that answers my question. Note that it's not about whether he retires or not. That's of course an idiosyncratic decision. But it's about why he would have a farewell tour that avoids the big events and concentrates on the small ones. Of course that's an idiosyncratic decision, too, but it's a bizarre one that doesn't make much sense.
 
He probably doesn't want to go through qualies. Even Groth wasn't given a retirement WC, they are meant for up and coming players.
Come on. Groth may be a home player but he never did anything at a Slam. Ferrer is a former Slam finalist and world #3 who also made the semis in Australia. He would have been given a wild card.

And I'm even more confident that as a former finalist, he would get a wildcard for Roland Garros. With his decision as stands, his last Slam match is on Ashe against Nadal, sure. And that might be a fitting farewell. On the other hand, he couldn't complete the match. If he played both the Australian Open and Roland Garros, or at least one of them, the chances are that his final slam match would not be one that ended in withdrawal.
 

George Turner

Hall of Fame
Well, yeah. On the other hand:

1997: got thrashed by Sampras. Freaked out about not being as good as Sampras on grass and so retired prematurely. Lost his career and loads of future earnings potential when he was still arguably the #2 player in the world on faster surfaces (after the injury at Wimbledon 1996, he played some of his best tennis in fall 1996 in the indoor season).
Boris was still partially active in 1997 and 1998, he entered 11 tournaments in 1997 and 10 in 1998. He finished the years ranked outside the top 50, his natural end had arrived by 1997.

On topic, i would say Ferrer is uninterested in playing the Australian Open because he's unlikely to win a match there and doesn't feel the need to make a farewell appearance. Hopman cup is an easier standard for him.
 
Yet again, reporting a decision ad nauseam DOES NOT provide reasons for it. The thread title is not, "What? Ferrer's not playing the Australian Open?" Until you know the difference between what and why, you might want to avoid calling others slow.

Nothing in the video link explains the decision in a way that answers my question. Note that it's not about whether he retires or not. That's of course an idiosyncratic decision. But it's about why he would have a farewell tour that avoids the big events and concentrates on the small ones. Of course that's an idiosyncratic decision, too, but it's a bizarre one that doesn't make much sense.
The most bizarre thing, to me, is as you say, flying all the way to Australia for the Hopman Cup, yet not appearing at the AO.

Calling it quits after the US Open last year, fair enough.

Calling it 'almost' quits there, but with the caveat that he'll play one last tournament in front of his home fans - OK.

But calling it 'almost' quits then, yet continuing to fly around the world for an exhibition, and not play in the slam held in the same country a few weeks later - downright weird.
 
The most bizarre thing, to me, is as you say, flying all the way to Australia for the Hopman Cup, yet not appearing at the AO.

Calling it quits after the US Open last year, fair enough.

Calling it 'almost' quits there, but with the caveat that he'll play one last tournament in front of his home fans - OK.

But calling it 'almost' quits then, yet continuing to fly around the world for an exhibition, and not play in the slam held in the same country a few weeks later - downright weird.
Right. That's the point. Now, admittedly, Perth is a long way from Melbourne. It's probably equivalent to playing in Los Angeles and then skipping an event in New Orleans or Chicago. But considering how far Perth is from Spain, the extra flight is pretty minimal. What a long way to go for that exhibition alone!
 
Boris was still partially active in 1997 and 1998, he entered 11 tournaments in 1997 and 10 in 1998. He finished the years ranked outside the top 50, his natural end had arrived by 1997.

On topic, i would say Ferrer is uninterested in playing the Australian Open because he's unlikely to win a match there and doesn't feel the need to make a farewell appearance. Hopman cup is an easier standard for him.
I don't think his natural end had arrived by 1997. I think he had a couple more years of good tennis in majors left in him at that point. I mean, he was just sixth months off some of the best tennis of his or anyone's career. I know he was still partially active after Wimbledon 1997. That's why I made the comparison to Ferrer.

I don't see why Ferrer losing in the first round in Australia would make it not worth his while to play. And I also think he might well win a round there. This week, he beat Matthew Ebden (world #46) and Lucas Pouille (#32). He even took Alexander Zverev (#4!) to a final set tiebreak. That suggests he's playing very good tennis. As a non-seed, he'd have roughly a two-thirds chance of playing a fellow non-seed in round 1, in which case he'd go in with a good shot of winning, even if he is less effective over five sets these days. And if he lost to a seed, that would give him a high-profile match with little downside to losing and major upside to pulling off the upset. Pouille will be seeded, and Ferrer just showed he can still hang with him. Imagine if Ferrer beat Pouille in his farewell Slam!
 

DSH

Hall of Fame
The most bizarre thing, to me, is as you say, flying all the way to Australia for the Hopman Cup, yet not appearing at the AO.

Calling it quits after the US Open last year, fair enough.

Calling it 'almost' quits there, but with the caveat that he'll play one last tournament in front of his home fans - OK.

But calling it 'almost' quits then, yet continuing to fly around the world for an exhibition, and not play in the slam held in the same country a few weeks later - downright weird.
quote:
Among the reasons for his retirement, Ferrer does not include the birth of his first child last May, but includes his age and physical problems. The ailments that you have continuously in your Achilles tendon, for example. "Leo has nothing to do with the decision I made, it has cost me much more physically because I rest less, but it has not influenced 2019. It's because I do not give the level I want and I do not have the opportunity It's not because of my son, if I was up in the ranking, I would continue playing. "
 
quote:
Among the reasons for his retirement, Ferrer does not include the birth of his first child last May, but includes his age and physical problems. The ailments that you have continuously in your Achilles tendon, for example. "Leo has nothing to do with the decision I made, it has cost me much more physically because I rest less, but it has not influenced 2019. It's because I do not give the level I want and I do not have the opportunity It's not because of my son, if I was up in the ranking, I would continue playing. "
So why doesn't he just retire, or play one last time in a Spanish tournament?

I still don't see why he flew half way around the world for the Hopman Cup.
 

EloQuent

G.O.A.T.
Come on. Groth may be a home player but he never did anything at a Slam. Ferrer is a former Slam finalist and world #3 who also made the semis in Australia. He would have been given a wild card.

And I'm even more confident that as a former finalist, he would get a wildcard for Roland Garros. With his decision as stands, his last Slam match is on Ashe against Nadal, sure. And that might be a fitting farewell. On the other hand, he couldn't complete the match. If he played both the Australian Open and Roland Garros, or at least one of them, the chances are that his final slam match would not be one that ended in withdrawal.
I'm not sure he deserves a WC if it's uncertain he can finish a 5 setter. And I'm guessing he didn't ask for it.
 

EloQuent

G.O.A.T.
So why doesn't he just retire, or play one last time in a Spanish tournament?

I still don't see why he flew half way around the world for the Hopman Cup.
Hopman Cup is a fun exo. And he is planning on retiring at a Spanish tournament later this year.
 

DSH

Hall of Fame
So why doesn't he just retire, or play one last time in a Spanish tournament?

I still don't see why he flew half way around the world for the Hopman Cup.




In his last months of his career, Ferrer only plays for fun in tournaments where he has good memories, as well as the lack of motivation for not being able to compete at the highest level (due to his physical problems) because it is logical that he no longer wants to go through suffering to enter a qualy to qualify for a grand slam, and even if the organization gave him a wild card, for the Spaniard it would be enough punishment to face someone with such a high ranking as nadal in the past us open, just not worth it .
therefore, it is best to say goodbye to the circuit with good emotional and physical sensations, since every professional of the elite, such as David Ferrer, wants to avoid spending the rest of his life with injuries that could be even worse if he continues to crush his body. as exhausting matches as the grand slams that are played to the best of five sets.
and yes, he will play in a spanish soil.
 
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marc45

G.O.A.T.
Yet again, reporting a decision ad nauseam DOES NOT provide reasons for it. The thread title is not, "What? Ferrer's not playing the Australian Open?" Until you know the difference between what and why, you might want to avoid calling others slow.

Nothing in the video link explains the decision in a way that answers my question. Note that it's not about whether he retires or not. That's of course an idiosyncratic decision. But it's about why he would have a farewell tour that avoids the big events and concentrates on the small ones. Of course that's an idiosyncratic decision, too, but it's a bizarre one that doesn't make much sense.
it makes sense to him and that's all that matters....he's a huge Davis cup guy and he got to represent Spain here again, obviously that was enough for him right now
 
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it makes sense to him and that's all that matters....he's a huge Davis cup guy and he got to represent Spain here again, obviously that was enough for him right now
That's fair enough, I suppose, although I tend to think we usually have reasons for our action that can be made explicable to others. To me, it's a shame that he won't play. But he must do what he thinks is right, of course.
 

DSH

Hall of Fame
Yet again, reporting a decision ad nauseam DOES NOT provide reasons for it. The thread title is not, "What? Ferrer's not playing the Australian Open?" Until you know the difference between what and why, you might want to avoid calling others slow.

Nothing in the video link explains the decision in a way that answers my question. Note that it's not about whether he retires or not. That's of course an idiosyncratic decision. But it's about why he would have a farewell tour that avoids the big events and concentrates on the small ones. Of course that's an idiosyncratic decision, too, but it's a bizarre one that doesn't make much sense.
you have to read between the lines, but here we go, who better than the same ferrer to answer your concern:
When you defined the farewell calendar, did you not consider leaving in a "Grand slam"?

- No, I was excited to finish my career in a «Grand Slam» with the game at the US Open center against Rafa. At this point I'm not thrilled to play on track 19 of a "Grand Slam" and be fighting with someone who has no impact.

-Why did you decide it was time to quit?

-There is a time when you see that you no longer win matches that you were used to winning or that you can not play the tournaments you would like. There you see that it is a good time to open a new stage.
 

Stretchy Man

Professional
There's no point entering a tournament if you have zero chance of winning, except for experience but he doesn't need anymore of that.
 
In his last months of his career, Ferrer only plays for fun in tournaments where he has good memories, as well as the lack of motivation for not being able to compete at the highest level (due to his physical problems) because it is logical that he no longer wants to go through suffering to enter a qualy to qualify for a grand slam, and even if the organization gave him a wild card, for the Spaniard it would be enough punishment to face someone with such a high ranking as nadal in the past us open, just not worth it .
therefore, it is best to say goodbye to the circuit with good emotional and physical sensations, since every professional of the elite, such as David Ferrer, wants to avoid spending the rest of his life with injuries that could be even worse if he continues to crush his body. as exhausting matches as the grand slams that are played to the best of five sets.
and yes, he will play in a spanish soil.
Well, it's his life and career. Seems a bizarre way to retire though IMHO.
 
you have to read between the lines, but here we go, who better than the same ferrer to answer your concern:
When you defined the farewell calendar, did you not consider leaving in a "Grand slam"?

- No, I was excited to finish my career in a «Grand Slam» with the game at the US Open center against Rafa. At this point I'm not thrilled to play on track 19 of a "Grand Slam" and be fighting with someone who has no impact.

-Why did you decide it was time to quit?

-There is a time when you see that you no longer win matches that you were used to winning or that you can not play the tournaments you would like. There you see that it is a good time to open a new stage.
I mean, clearly the ultimate answer is, "Because he doesn't want to." But nothing that I have seen so far adequately gets at my question, which, again, is NOT, "Why is he retiring?" but "Why is he having this weird farewell tour?" I get it, he wants to represent Spain. But it's a hell of a long way to go for a pretty pointless exhibition when he could stick around and play Australia or Auckland (which he's won before) or just not bother going all that way in the first place. So far as I know at least, he'll even be in Melbourne during the Australian Open for commentary purposes or just to watch. I thought it was weird when Becker had a farewell tour of pretty meaningless minor events and I think it's weird again now.

As for not wanting to play on court 19, I think the Australian Open would put him on Margaret Court or at least Show Court 2 or 3.

But it is what it is. Not all decisions are explicable to other people.
 

Mainad

Bionic Poster
I mean, clearly the ultimate answer is, "Because he doesn't want to." But nothing that I have seen so far adequately gets at my question, which, again, is NOT, "Why is he retiring?" but "Why is he having this weird farewell tour?" I get it, he wants to represent Spain. But it's a hell of a long way to go for a pretty pointless exhibition when he could stick around and play Australia or Auckland (which he's won before)
Auckland is on his schedule to play.
 

LETitBE

Hall of Fame
The most bizarre thing, to me, is as you say, flying all the way to Australia for the Hopman Cup, yet not appearing at the AO.

Calling it quits after the US Open last year, fair enough.

Calling it 'almost' quits there, but with the caveat that he'll play one last tournament in front of his home fans - OK.

But calling it 'almost' quits then, yet continuing to fly around the world for an exhibition, and not play in the slam held in the same country a few weeks later - downright weird.
holiday
 

weelie

Semi-Pro
So there you have it:
Due to injuries, his ranking and level has dropped. So he needs a light schedule. Skip the slams, they are BO5 and he will start at the very bottom. Slams don't mean a thing for him now, as he sees he will not reach something like a QF. With this perspective, he does not care about ranking anymore. Probably not about money either. It is about still competing, playing well and not hurting yourself.
He wants to end in his way, which is in Spain. He still wants to keep in good match shape until that. So he will go to places he likes, where he gets good practice and enjoys his time ...and can make an impact.

Anybody actually know his full schedule for 2019?
 
Well, it's his life and career. Seems a bizarre way to retire though IMHO.
Not just "your" humble opinion, but mine too! Especially as he is apparently playing Auckland, too. So, he flew all the way to Perth, then thousands of miles east to Auckland but not half way back. Or is he going to be in Melbourne but just not playing? Maybe he'll enter the senior event at the Australian Open, given his focus on those events that matter least.
 

thrust

Hall of Fame
I get this but OP’s point still stands. He went all the way to Australia, why not let himself finish his last match at a major instead of retire?
He probably got a lot of appearance money. Also, he is competing for Spain. Playing 3 of 5 sets would be tough for him at this point, as he doesn't have Roger's net game to make matches shorter.
 

augustobt

Legend
He said his body can't stand long matches anymore. US Open was his last major and Madrid will be his final tournament.
 

Bukmeikara

Legend
This is his decision why just not accept it and get on with it. Is that simple. Imagine someone asking you why you want to eat burger instead of pizza...
 

Zardoz7/12

Professional
I don't think his body can cope playing 5 set matches any more, he's been dealing with a recurrence of Achilles tendinitis and calf related issues which is going to stop Ferrer from his bread and butter which is chasing down shots and grinding out rallies. How his body held him playing the style of tennis he plays at elite level for the last 15 years beats me. Hard work really does pay off.
 
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