Why the Osaka dislike?

How do you feel?

  • I like her!

  • She's aiiiight

  • I'm indifferent

  • Ban her 4 life


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#5
Never was her fan before, not her fan now, neither do i honestly care about her most recent split...i'm looking forward to different players performing! Lets hope Kerber can still do some damage at grand slams, other than that - don't care much for WTA tour these days...maybe if Henin still played...
 
#7
Why does she lie about where she's from? She says she's Japanese but doesn't speak the language, hasn't lived there since she was 3 and doesn't live there now. She is 100% American so it's strange she maintains the charade that she's Japanese.
I understand this, but at the same time maybe it was due to financial help? To me personally, her nationality she plays for is not such a big deal. My thoughts though.
 
#13
Or because someone pulled off "drama queen" by playing victim card in the most cringeworthy way possible and people didn't want to side with that person?...
Fair enough. I can not speak for others, and while I see how that could certainly be the reason why people would like her after the Serena dramatics, I have always found her game play to be enjoyable to watch. Maybe that is just me :)
 
#16
Why does she lie about where she's from? She says she's Japanese but doesn't speak the language, hasn't lived there since she was 3 and doesn't live there now. She is 100% American so it's strange she maintains the charade that she's Japanese.
You're totally wrong. She's not lying about where she's from. She's ethnically half Japanese-half Haitian. Just because she doesn't speak the language well doesn't make her any less Japanese. Look at Sharapova, she's "Russian" but is basically American. Osaka chose to represent Japan because the USTA didn't offer her enough support. You'd prefer players abandon their heritage and claim to be from wherever they have citizenship, like Zverev, Raonic, Shapavalov, Mladenovic, Garcia.
 
#18
You're totally wrong. She's not lying about where she's from. She's ethnically half Japanese-half Haitian. Just because she doesn't speak the language well doesn't make her any less Japanese. Look at Sharapova, she's "Russian" but is basically American. Osaka chose to represent Japan because the USTA didn't offer her enough support. You'd prefer players abandon their heritage and claim to be from wherever they have citizenship, like Zverev, Raonic, Shapavalov, Mladenovic, Garcia.
Excellent point about Sharapova!
 
#23
I didn’t read all the recent responses about her split to say, but of those I did read it just feels like maybe people think she is unfairly undercutting him, or that it’s frankly a stupid move to fire the person who brought you from 70-something to number one in such a short time. Well I’ll correct myself - that’s how I feel, but I still like her. About her speaking issues, she does need to improve there. I’m sure she knows that and is working on it.
 
#24
I think the coach thing struck a nerve with some people, seems really disloyal that someone that worked hard with you and probably provided a lot of important intel on Serena for the USO final got booted to the curb because she didn't want to pay up. Of course being outsiders we don't know how much of that is true but if that is the case it's pretty low.
I made the comment earlier in a different thread about the split. Despite the successes shown in her tennis that seems to have been brought by his coaching, if they did not get along personally and she did not enjoy having him apart of her team, why continue keeping him?
 
#28
I made the comment earlier in a different thread about the split. Despite the successes shown in her tennis that seems to have been brought by his coaching, if they did not get along personally and she did not enjoy having him apart of her team, why continue keeping him?
Because her job is to win as many tournaments as possible. There are lots of people that don't like their co-workers but if the company is exceeding plan and everyone is making money they deal with it.
 
#29
Why does she lie about where she's from? She says she's Japanese but doesn't speak the language, hasn't lived there since she was 3 and doesn't live there now. She is 100% American so it's strange she maintains the charade that she's Japanese.
She was born in Osaka, Japan (from where she took her surname) to a Japanese mother and a Haitian father. It's true she has lived most of her life in the US but she chose to represent her country of birth when in her early teens with her family's encouragement. She is not yet fully fluent in Japanese but she is learning the language. To me, her accent already sounds a bit Japanese. Mary Pierce was born in Canada, grew up in the US, but chose to represent her mother's country, France. Maria Sharapova grew up and still lives in the US but has always chosen to represent Russia, her country of birth. Such examples are not uncommon.
 
#30
At first thought she was painfully shy but even shy people can come off as somewhat intelligent. After she won big and got a PR team she still seemed like an airhead even in scripted interviews. She seems like she's dumb as a box of rocks (I take it back if English is not her first language).
But what do we know, she may be playing 4-D chess and dumping Bajin will prove her brilliance.
 
#31
I think the coach thing struck a nerve with some people, seems really disloyal that someone that worked hard with you and probably provided a lot of important intel on Serena for the USO final got booted to the curb because she didn't want to pay up. Of course being outsiders we don't know how much of that is true but if that is the case it's pretty low.
Agreed with this. If someone did something similar to me i know i'd be miffed.

I don't get the criticism of her shy, awkward interviews, She's a tennis player not a news broadcaster! I guess it's more acceptable to be a brat like Kyrgios, or totally arrogant and up themself like Sharapova.
 
#36
She was born in Osaka, Japan (from where she took her surname) to a Japanese mother and a Haitian father. It's true she has lived most of her life in the US but she chose to represent her country of birth when in her early teens with her family's encouragement. She is not yet fully fluent in Japanese but she is learning the language. To me, her accent already sounds a bit Japanese. Mary Pierce was born in Canada, grew up in the US, but chose to represent her mother's country, France. Maria Sharapova grew up and still lives in the US but has always chosen to represent Russia, her country of birth. Such examples are not uncommon.
Is Nishikori filthy rich because he's that great a player or is he rich because of all the Japanese endorsements?
 
#37
I get confused when people focus on which country a player represents.
It's mostly an individual sport where players are playing for themselves. Nationality on really matters when it comes to something like the Olympics.

People seem to read into things and see stuff that isn't there.
As a shy and reserved person who doesn't show a lot of feelings myself, I often notice people mistake it for aloofness or rudeness.
I guess I identify with Naomi in that respect so I have a lot of admiration for her.
 
#39
I get confused when people focus on which country a player represents.
It's mostly an individual sport where players are playing for themselves. Nationality on really matters when it comes to something like the Olympics..
No such dichotomy. Players represent both themselves and their nation everywhere, not only in the Olympics. Otherwise, we wouldn't see this Wikipedia list of Grand Slam winners with their country flag next to their name:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Grand_Slam_men's_singles_champions
 
#41
Why does she lie about where she's from? She says she's Japanese but doesn't speak the language, hasn't lived there since she was 3 and doesn't live there now. She is 100% American so it's strange she maintains the charade that she's Japanese.
I believe, and I may be wrong here, that she represents Japan under the wishes of her parents as a reminder of her Japanese heritage? I thought I read that somewhere.
 
#43
"mindless exotic looking ball basher" (the last of which I consider a racist comment).
That's quite a stretch--so which words are we now not allowed to use in polite progressive company?--"exotic" or "mindless"? I'll be going to Starbucks today and don't want to be ostracized.

It won't be long now folks--you can kiss this thread bye-bye! No wonder pickle-ball is taking over the courts.
The "discussion" will be ending shortly now that the "word" has been uttered.
 
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#44
I like Osaka, I think she’s a breath of fresh air to the WTA and tennis in general. People get caught up in her heritage, she’s allowed claim whatever she chooses. Her recent split with her coach is really not for us to judge. Let the girl play tennis everyone! Btw, she may not be fluent but she does speak and understand Japanese.
 
#45
I think the coach thing struck a nerve with some people, seems really disloyal that someone that worked hard with you and probably provided a lot of important intel on Serena for the USO final got booted to the curb because she didn't want to pay up. Of course being outsiders we don't know how much of that is true but if that is the case it's pretty low.
Exactly. Nobody really knows why they parted ways yet they are jumping to conclusions.

Just looking at Bajin's past history coaching, nobody has stuck with for very long. He's been with Serena, Azarenka, and Wozniacki. All for a year or less
 
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