Wilson Triniti Tennis Ball

treo

Semi-Pro
I have used these once in my ball machine at night when it was cold and no one wanted to hit. I only care that they have decent bounce and don't hurt my arm when cold. Mixed in with Tretorn Micro X and some pressureless balls, the Triniti felt softer and gave my arm a break from the hard Tretorns. I'll have to see how long they last. I had about half the balls Triniti of the 150 total balls.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
Definitely a ball that seems good enough for recreational players.
A ton of rec players use Costco Penn's and these are definitely better than those IMO.
In the end do any of us win or lose matches because of the balls? Probably not.

I hope enough people start using this kind of ball to stimulate more research into greener ball technologies. If people buy, companies will put the R&D into it and competition will lead to better and better balls.
 

JW10S

Hall of Fame
I absolutely hate these balls. The hard rubber that is used makes touch and feel shots more difficult and often the balls don't bounce but skid through the court. The seams on the Triniti balls are very inconsistent and you often see big wrinkles in the felt and if the ball happens to land on one of those wrinkles you get a bad bounce. The felt also seems to wear off pretty quickly in my experience and while they still bounce due to the hard rubber controlling them gets more difficult as they wear. Nice try but needs a lot more work.
 

McGradey

Semi-Pro
I don't mind the Trinitis, but they definitely bounce differently and feel different to most balls. When hit, they feel like they have a shell, rather than the uniform soft distortion you feel from most balls.

For playability, Slazenger hardcourt advantage all the way. Consistent bounce and durable felt.
 

TagUrIt

Hall of Fame
I’m going to pick up a case, but not for matches for ball machine practice. I think they meant to used for that purpose more so than match play.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
I absolutely hate these balls. The hard rubber that is used makes touch and feel shots more difficult and often the balls don't bounce but skid through the court. The seams on the Triniti balls are very inconsistent and you often see big wrinkles in the felt and if the ball happens to land on one of those wrinkles you get a bad bounce. The felt also seems to wear off pretty quickly in my experience and while they still bounce due to the hard rubber controlling them gets more difficult as they wear. Nice try but needs a lot more work.
Not seen big wrinkles in any of the balls I've used nor funny bounces. I think the felt is the limiting factor but it moves them from play balls to serve practice balls once the felt is dead.

I think they need some more work but I don't think you get that kind of R&D unless you get competition and you don't get competition if players aren't willing to buy the balls. I think this is a simple sacrifice to make to push for greener technology in tennis.

I've played plenty of matches with these balls and had lots of positive comments about them lately as more people get used to their play characteristics. But that may be from living in the PNW where people tend to be a bit more environmentally sensitive and willing to adopt greener things more easily.
 
I tried them. Massive fail. They are harder on the strings. If I wanted that I'd go with pressureless. So I'll stick with Wilson US Open for regular play and for my ball machine I'll keep using SetPoint Pulp from Spinfire, which I use with my Spinfire Pro 2 Ball Machine. Tretorn Micro-X are also good too but are more expensive. I just don't see where the Triniti ball really fits in the scheme of things though I laud Wilson for trying to be more eco-conscious with their cardboard box.
 
These balls are fine imo, but it depends on the use and your expectations.

I used them for some time this winter while playing with my kid. They play different from our regular balls (Dunlop Fort Max), but so do Babolat, Head or even the other Dunlops. While I like some of these balls more than others, I can play with all of these and will have to in competition. EDIT: I will not be purchasing Trinity for competition use, I do not like them enough for that, not by a long shot :)

One thing’s for sure: they absolutely have more life after a few times playing, where other balls die after being opened for a few days.
 
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Deleted member 768841

Guest
I have a few cans, they are pretty durable. I like them, they smell kinda odd, but they feel just like a tennis ball.
 

zinzan8

Rookie
I’ve just tried a can yesterday. Seemed fine to me, not hard on my elbow like Penn Pressureless balls.

I currently use a basket of miscellaneous old balls for practice (most from a case if cheap Penns from Wal-Mart), but might transition to these if they really hold up a lot longer.
 
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