Wilson Trinity Balls

topspn

Hall of Fame
Interesting..


 

esgee48

Legend
The paper tube will hex shaped cells will be quite strong. What concerns me is weight and whether the tubes will retain pressure. At least with plastic, you could crimp the alu rip top on. Not sure how they do it with paper unless it is with glue. And what happens if you dent the tube though I guess internal pressure will help buffer any major damage to the tube.
 

MAX PLY

Hall of Fame
The Triniti balls do not come in a pressurized container. However, I believe the balls themselves are pressurized—that is precisely the innovation. The materials they use allow for a thicker wall with lighter material to keep the pressure in the ball plus the felt is supposedly engineered to help mimic the traditional feel of a traditional pressurized ball. Intriguing!
 

1HBHfanatic

Hall of Fame
The Triniti balls do not come in a pressurized container. However, I believe the balls themselves are pressurized—that is precisely the innovation. The materials they use allow for a thicker wall with lighter material to keep the pressure in the ball plus the felt is supposedly engineered to help mimic the traditional feel of a traditional pressurized ball. Intriguing!
agreed,, intriguing!!
but they better bring the price down,, otherwise it will be a non starter
I don't see myself paying 2x as much for a pressurized ball..
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
Interesting..


so how long does this ball last ?? Twice as long as normal US open balls ??
 
so how long does this ball last ?? Twice as long as normal US open balls ??
The balls seem to last around 5-6 hours of hard hitting. After that, they get slow off the ground and lose their bounce, but are incredibly consistent until then. The felt stays tight and does not wear down so the flight of the ball doesn't change from new. There's excellent aural feedback when you mis-hit it slightly.

The big benefit is that you don't have to worry about opening a new can for a short hitting session because the Triniti balls will be just as good the next time you play, even if that next time is a week or two later.
 
The Triniti balls do not come in a pressurized container. However, I believe the balls themselves are pressurized—that is precisely the innovation. The materials they use allow for a thicker wall with lighter material to keep the pressure in the ball plus the felt is supposedly engineered to help mimic the traditional feel of a traditional pressurized ball. Intriguing!
My understanding is that the thicker ball material acts partially like a pressureless ball, so the Triniti are low pressure. Whereas a typical ball is around 12-13 PSI, a Triniti ball is around 2-3 PSI.
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
My understanding is that the thicker ball material acts partially like a pressureless ball, so the Triniti are low pressure. Whereas a typical ball is around 12-13 PSI, a Triniti ball is around 2-3 PSI.
Thicker Ball material ?? what does that mean ? like thicker felt or rubber ? Won't that make the ball heavier than regulation ball ? then it can't be use in ATP tournaments
 
Thicker Ball material ?? what does that mean ? like thicker felt or rubber ? Won't that make the ball heavier than regulation ball ? then it can't be use in ATP tournaments
The rubber is a lower density compound so it can be made thicker and still weigh the same.

The ball feels a very slight bit lighter on impact than the Dunlop ATP and about the same as the US Open balls, but comes off the stringbed slowly like those two balls. It really takes spin well and I can really get the ball to hop up high with heavy top. The ball places a premium on stroke production because a weak stroke will produce a slower sitter that can be attacked. Even if it's not a competition ball, it is a great practice ball.
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
The rubber is a lower density compound so it can be made thicker and still weigh the same.

The ball feels a very slight bit lighter on impact than the Dunlop ATP and about the same as the US Open balls, but comes off the stringbed slowly like those two balls. It really takes spin well and I can really get the ball to hop up high with heavy top. The ball places a premium on stroke production because a weak stroke will produce a slower sitter that can be attacked. Even if it's not a competition ball, it is a great practice ball.
Yooo Hoo................. this is my ball. my 3000 RPM groundies could be unstoppable now.
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
The rubber is a lower density compound so it can be made thicker and still weigh the same.

The ball feels a very slight bit lighter on impact than the Dunlop ATP and about the same as the US Open balls, but comes off the stringbed slowly like those two balls. It really takes spin well and I can really get the ball to hop up high with heavy top. The ball places a premium on stroke production because a weak stroke will produce a slower sitter that can be attacked. Even if it's not a competition ball, it is a great practice ball.
I am trying to buy it now but I don't see it anywhere in the TW website ??

https://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Tennis_Balls/catpage-TBALLS.html
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
The rubber is a lower density compound so it can be made thicker and still weigh the same.

The ball feels a very slight bit lighter on impact than the Dunlop ATP and about the same as the US Open balls, but comes off the stringbed slowly like those two balls. It really takes spin well and I can really get the ball to hop up high with heavy top. The ball places a premium on stroke production because a weak stroke will produce a slower sitter that can be attacked. Even if it's not a competition ball, it is a great practice ball.
is this Wilson's equivalent to Penn Marathon balls ? or is Wilson trinity better ?
 
is this Wilson's equivalent to Penn Marathon balls ? or is Wilson trinity better ?
The Marathon balls, in my opinion, are the best full pressure balls out there. They last a long time - two cans gets me through two 90 minute nonstop hitting sessions without noticeable degradation - and are consistent from ball to ball and from can to can. That being said, they are very fast and hard balls, especially when new. They carry a long way on the bounce and make it easy to get lazy and just stand on the baseline knowing the bounce will almost always carry back that far. Our Club tends to have faster courts and the Marathons are too almost too fast when playing against a hard hitter.

The Trinity are slower off the stringbed and lose more forward speed on the bounce, even though the bounce is just as high.. They also seem to absorb proportionally more energy as you swing harder, making it really necessary to swing hard with good contact to hit a clean winner from the baseline.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
The balls seem to last around 5-6 hours of hard hitting. After that, they get slow off the ground and lose their bounce, but are incredibly consistent until then. The felt stays tight and does not wear down so the flight of the ball doesn't change from new. There's excellent aural feedback when you mis-hit it slightly.

The big benefit is that you don't have to worry about opening a new can for a short hitting session because the Triniti balls will be just as good the next time you play, even if that next time is a week or two later.
I use a ball compressor, so my balls are always fresh and lively.

Overall, are there any positive points about this ball compared to existing balls?
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
The Marathon balls, in my opinion, are the best full pressure balls out there. They last a long time - two cans gets me through two 90 minute nonstop hitting sessions without noticeable degradation - and are consistent from ball to ball and from can to can. That being said, they are very fast and hard balls, especially when new. They carry a long way on the bounce and make it easy to get lazy and just stand on the baseline knowing the bounce will almost always carry back that far. Our Club tends to have faster courts and the Marathons are too almost too fast when playing against a hard hitter.

The Trinity are slower off the stringbed and lose more forward speed on the bounce, even though the bounce is just as high.. They also seem to absorb proportionally more energy as you swing harder, making it really necessary to swing hard with good contact to hit a clean winner from the baseline.
I usually buy a case of balls at a time from TW. I make it last as long as I can by using ball compressors and trying to get other people to produce new balls (I am a cheap guy). Do you think the Triniti balls will have a lower shelf life, i.e., must be consumed faster than other balls before they lose their pressure?
 
I use a ball compressor, so my balls are always fresh and lively.

Overall, are there any positive points about this ball compared to existing balls?
If you have a ball compressor, then much of the benefit of the Triniti ball isn't going to be there for you. The main thing would be that the felt is very good and long lasting, and doesn't fluff up.
 
I usually buy a case of balls at a time from TW. I make it last as long as I can by using ball compressors and trying to get other people to produce new balls (I am a cheap guy). Do you think the Triniti balls will have a lower shelf life, i.e., must be consumed faster than other balls before they lose their pressure?
I've left the balls in my bag for a month and they don't seem to degrade. It is only hours of play that seem to make them significantly change.
 

mmk

Hall of Fame
Anyone remember the feltless, pressureless balls in the mid 70s? I think they were either Tretorns or Tensors, they actually played fairly well. I'll probably try the Trinitis when they come out, assuming they aren't ridiculously expensive.
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
The Marathon balls, in my opinion, are the best full pressure balls out there. They last a long time - two cans gets me through two 90 minute nonstop hitting sessions without noticeable degradation - and are consistent from ball to ball and from can to can. That being said, they are very fast and hard balls, especially when new. They carry a long way on the bounce and make it easy to get lazy and just stand on the baseline knowing the bounce will almost always carry back that far. Our Club tends to have faster courts and the Marathons are too almost too fast when playing against a hard hitter.

The Trinity are slower off the stringbed and lose more forward speed on the bounce, even though the bounce is just as high.. They also seem to absorb proportionally more energy as you swing harder, making it really necessary to swing hard with good contact to hit a clean winner from the baseline.
novak Djokovic would love this ball
 
My 24 cans can last more than a year so I need to be sure about shelf life.
This many be an issue that will show up with time. Having it be a cardboard container means it may be susceptible to things like ozone that can take the elasticity out of the ball carcass. I'll ask and see if I can get an answer as to what Wilson believes is the shelf life of the balls.

Got to say that a case of balls only lasts me maybe 5-6 weeks. Too often, I'll open up two cans for a hitting session and they are not good for the next time I have a hitting session so I toss them out, usually because the balls depressurize. I should probably invest in a pressurized of some sort.
 

topspn

Hall of Fame
$5.49 Triniti balls vs $2.17 Championship balls
Even basic cost has to be looked at over time and durability. Championship balls are barely playable for 2 hours. Pro Penn which cost $3.25 a can play well for a good 4hrs. So how long can these play well for is the question?
 

Keonini

New User
Nobody mentions the deadball sound when hitting. It doesnt remove the quality of the balls but it feels strange the first couple of hours. Every courts around us ask us about this sound haha.

I cannot add too much to the durability yet but after 3-4 hours of playing the ball is still ok. Propenn are dead at this time (in my case).

To make a strange comparison

Triniti = rpm blast (dead but stable)
Pressure balls = luxilon (lively but loose it after a while)

I hope i will have more to add after few more practices.
 
I've come to understand there were some last minute formulation changes to the rubber in the ball prior to production. It is possible that those changes coincided with a marketing decision to not use the black and red cardboard sleeve but to instead use pastel colors which hint at environmental friendliness.

I should be hitting with some of these revised Triniti balls soon, but in my testing of the previous formulation, the balls last five to six hours of hard hitting, whereas the longest lasting regular ball (which in my experience is the regular duty Pro Penn Marathon) is good for only three hours and then only if the second hitting session is within a couple of days of the first. The Triniti balls seem to not degrade even when used and then sitting in my bag for a week or two.
 
I usually buy a case of balls at a time from TW. I make it last as long as I can by using ball compressors and trying to get other people to produce new balls (I am a cheap guy). Do you think the Triniti balls will have a lower shelf life, i.e., must be consumed faster than other balls before they lose their pressure?
do ball compressors actually work?
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
I wonder what happens if you stick them into that yellow ball pressurizer thing.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I had the same question. I think it won't help because the air won't get inside just like it is more difficult to get outside in this kind of ball.
 
I wonder what happens if you stick them into that yellow ball pressurizer thing.
My understanding is that these are very low pressure balls, using something like two to three PSI whereas a regular tennis ball uses 12 to 14 PSI. There is supposed to be an air impermeable layer so that low amount of pressure won't escape, but also means that you can't get pressure inside of it either.
 
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