Wilson Trinity Balls

Your review sounds like the many reviews of the Tretorn Micro X balls.

“They feel like pressured balls.”
I looked around to see if I could buy a can/carton of three Micro X balls to compare with the Triniti but can only find bags of 72 and 144 balls. Anyone know where just a three ball package is available?
 

Dartagnan64

Legend
Played a mixer last night with them. Definitely take some getting used to but they played consistently for the 2 hours. You can definitely get spin and bounce with them. They are really good for cool heavy air like we have in the PNW. They might be too bouncy for hot dry conditions.

Felt heavier than Pro Penns but similar to Dunlop Fort.
 

Mongolmike

Hall of Fame
Got gifted a "can" last night. Was curious, so opened the container... was very surprised at the low quality of the felt application. Felt bunched up and wrinkled along the seams on all 3 balls. And the seams themselves were not trimmed well... little rubber tabs protruding. Have not hit with them yet, but at $6 a can, I'd hope to see a less shabby looking ball.

Now looks aren't everything, but I got to think that these wrinkles, or sections were the felt is bunched up, those are going to continue to tear away from the core with repeated topspin hits. Am curious as to how they play, but from what others have described with the play and what I see as poor quality construction, I think these are a fail, environment savior or not.
 

Dartagnan64

Legend
One thing I will say about them is they hold their bounce incredibly well. I'd suggest people pick up a bunch of these just solely as "hopper balls" for serve practice. They may lose their felt over time but they don't go dead like pressurized balls.

I played some more on clay with them and they are reasonable balls and something I will likely look at more seriously down the road as I personally value the environment a bit more than ball quality. If they feel like a tennis ball, spin like a tennis ball, bounce like a tennis ball, I'm not going to fuss.
 

Mongolmike

Hall of Fame
One thing I will say about them is they hold their bounce incredibly well. I'd suggest people pick up a bunch of these just solely as "hopper balls" for serve practice. They may lose their felt over time but they don't go dead like pressurized balls.

I played some more on clay with them and they are reasonable balls and something I will likely look at more seriously down the road as I personally value the environment a bit more than ball quality. If they feel like a tennis ball, spin like a tennis ball, bounce like a tennis ball, I'm not going to fuss.
So from an environmental point of view, are the balls themselves supposed to be more easy to degrade, or is it just the sleeve vs a plastic "can"?
I gotta think a tennis ball does not degrade quickly.
 

esgee48

Legend
Rubber does not deteriorate naturally. The process to create the stuff from sap makes the stuff very durable, i.e. car tires. The felt is woven plastic fiber, which does not break down very well either. I recycle the ball cans since they are made of plastic and aluminum.
 

Mongolmike

Hall of Fame
Rubber does not deteriorate naturally. The process to create the stuff from sap makes the stuff very durable, i.e. car tires. The felt is woven plastic fiber, which does not break down very well either. I recycle the ball cans since they are made of plastic and aluminum.
Right. Agreed. So then the big environmentally better selling point of these balls is really only about the sleeve, and has nothing to do with the balls, which we agree cannot be recycled in a literal sense (re-purposed- yes), and the balls do not break down easily over time.
 

Dartagnan64

Legend
So from an environmental point of view, are the balls themselves supposed to be more easy to degrade, or is it just the sleeve vs a plastic "can"?
I gotta think a tennis ball does not degrade quickly.
Plastic cans are the worse since the aluminum top makes them difficult to recycle and leads to a lot ending up in landfills.
The balls themselves play longer as the felt and pressure are more long-lasting. So that increases use meaning less balls need to be made. But the balls themselves are still not envronmentally friendly. Just friendlier than a set of Costco Penns that barely last a match.

If everyone used these balls twice as long as they used a can of regular balls, you'd eliminate production of half the world's tennis balls. A 50% reduction in tennis ball production is massive.

Consumerism is the greatest threat to the environment. If we can use our products longer and buy fewer products per year, that does more than driving electric cars ever will.
 

Idrayer

New User
Why is that then?
They almost felt to me similar to the green dot balls in that they would come off the racket and just slow down. The sound off the strings also sounded way too much like a pickle ball for me, and I feel like I received a lot of funny and unusual bounces. Less importantly but still relevant, the felt had a coarse feel in my hand that I just did not like at all. It also feels like my strings died about half a set into the match, almost like a switch went off.
 

Dartagnan64

Legend
I've played about 6 hours with one set and while they are different balls for sure, it is certainly possible to get used to them.

Pros:
1) Bounce lasts. Compared my hour old Triniti's to a fresh can of ProPenns and they both bounce the same height from a dead drop.
2) The felt and dwell time allows for great spin
3) Felt doesn't fuzz up

Cons:
1) Bit heavy
2) Sound funny
3) pricier than many balls

I think the pros outweigh the cons especially when you take into account the better packaging and durability. I'll be switching once I work through my cases of ProPenns and Dunlop Forts.
 

Roland G

Hall of Fame
Played a doubles match this morning with a fresh set of these. Dead-feeling and heavy, funny bounce made my timing suffer. Put them in the bin after and will not be buying again.
 

JW10S

Hall of Fame
I hate these balls. I don't like the hardness--there's very little feel on touch shots, and often times they skid through the court rather than bounce, and the felt wore off very quickly. Can you say gimmick? Next...
 
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Mongolmike

Hall of Fame
I agree with Roland and JW. Noticeable harder ball. I suppose I could get used to the change in feel, but I thought they bounced less too. Both my opponent and I agreed to change them out to a regular ball.

For me, with the price, the poor quality of the felt along the seams (did anyone else see this on their's?), the heaviness of the ball on the racquet, and the lesser feel.... no.

Sure, the sleeve will recycle better than a "can", but for all the above- no.

Along this line, if I restring my racquet with Kevlar, it should last longer and I won't have to string as often. Yes, that is pro environment since I am stringing less. Does my playing with Kevlar help my game or feel better on my arm? No. So that's the trade off.
 
I've played about 6 hours with one set and while they are different balls for sure, it is certainly possible to get used to them.

Pros:
1) Bounce lasts. Compared my hour old Triniti's to a fresh can of ProPenns and they both bounce the same height from a dead drop.
2) The felt and dwell time allows for great spin
3) Felt doesn't fuzz up

Cons:
1) Bit heavy
2) Sound funny
3) pricier than many balls

I think the pros outweigh the cons especially when you take into account the better packaging and durability. I'll be switching once I work through my cases of ProPenns and Dunlop Forts.
I agree with these pros and cons.

The first few cartons of these balls certainly seem to have felt deformities at the edges of the seams. But while unsightly, they have no noticeable effect on play or consistency, and the deformity doesn't get worse even after hours of hard hitting.

They do feel heavy but play similarly to the US Open or Dunlop ATP ball after several minutes when they fluff up. The Triniti balls never fluff up so they stay consistent for a long time, unlike those other top tier balls.

I kind of like the noise they make. Definitely louder than a pressurized ball which is why they are a bit slower. A teaching pro at our club has said the auditory feedback is really valuable when instructing as he can clearly hear how good contact is. But also valuable to me as I can clearly hear if my opponent has hit it clean or not.

They are slow, and sometimes it seems like the ball stays in contact with the ground a hair longer than a pressurized ball. But this is really no different than playing with normal balls on a slower court.

Would they be my first choice for a competitive match? Probably not, but that's self serving as I'm an aggressive player and these balls make me work harder to hit them past an opponent. As a practice ball, they are fantastic. Noticeably less temperature sensitive in terms of how it bounces, the felt wears really well and doesn't fluff up, and requires a firm and committed swing to get the ball moving fast. I swing poorly or make bad contact and the ball sits up for my opponent to be aggressive with. I would not recommend this ball for anyone experiencing arm or elbow issues, but then I also don't recommend Pro Penn Marathons for these players either.
 

Dartagnan64

Legend
Along this line, if I restring my racquet with Kevlar, it should last longer and I won't have to string as often. Yes, that is pro environment since I am stringing less. Does my playing with Kevlar help my game or feel better on my arm? No. So that's the trade off.
Few issues with your analogy. First off, changing performance of your strings affects only you, not your opponent. Playing with a different performing ball affects both players equally (in theory, since I guess someone could have a game that works better with a Trinity than a Pro Penn).

Secondly, strings are a fraction of the plastic waste tennis produces compared to balls. Sure once we fix the ball issue we should look at enviro strings as well. But saying I won't go with enviro balls because I don't go with enviro strings is a bad argument. It's not an all or nothing scenario. Every little bit helps and enough people doing a little more all the time is probably the only way we save Mother Earth.

Again, if you don't care, then it's probably a non-starter. I think these balls are first and foremost for those that care. Then if you do care, does the ball perform well enough for you to adapt to it's different performance. That's the big question.

I don't expect people not concerned for the environment to give these balls a try. I would expect anyone that does care should try them. Whether they stick with them comes down to a personal formula of how much self satisfaction is derived from doing envrionmental good deed vs. playing the ball you like the most.
 

tennis347

Semi-Pro
I agree with these pros and cons.

The first few cartons of these balls certainly seem to have felt deformities at the edges of the seams. But while unsightly, they have no noticeable effect on play or consistency, and the deformity doesn't get worse even after hours of hard hitting.

They do feel heavy but play similarly to the US Open or Dunlop ATP ball after several minutes when they fluff up. The Triniti balls never fluff up so they stay consistent for a long time, unlike those other top tier balls.

I kind of like the noise they make. Definitely louder than a pressurized ball which is why they are a bit slower. A teaching pro at our club has said the auditory feedback is really valuable when instructing as he can clearly hear how good contact is. But also valuable to me as I can clearly hear if my opponent has hit it clean or not.

They are slow, and sometimes it seems like the ball stays in contact with the ground a hair longer than a pressurized ball. But this is really no different than playing with normal balls on a slower court.

Would they be my first choice for a competitive match? Probably not, but that's self serving as I'm an aggressive player and these balls make me work harder to hit them past an opponent. As a practice ball, they are fantastic. Noticeably less temperature sensitive in terms of how it bounces, the felt wears really well and doesn't fluff up, and requires a firm and committed swing to get the ball moving fast. I swing poorly or make bad contact and the ball sits up for my opponent to be aggressive with. I would not recommend this ball for anyone experiencing arm or elbow issues, but then I also don't recommend Pro Penn Marathons for these players either.
If these balls are bit heavier than other brands and not arm friendly, I am staying away from them. That’s why I have been using Dunlop Championship XD ! Excellent playability and arm friendly along with an economical price. I much rather play with new balls every time out on the court.
 

Mongolmike

Hall of Fame
Again, if you don't care, then it's probably a non-starter. I think these balls are first and foremost for those that care. Then if you do care, does the ball perform well enough for you to adapt to it's different performance. That's the big question.

I don't expect people not concerned for the environment to give these balls a try. I would expect anyone that does care should try them. Whether they stick with them comes down to a personal formula of how much self satisfaction is derived from doing envrionmental good deed vs. playing the ball you like the most.
Wow. Really? So I don't care about the environment because I don't like balls that play different and come in a cardboard sleeve? smh Whatever makes you feel better than someone else dude.
 

Mongolmike

Hall of Fame
If these balls are bit heavier than other brands and not arm friendly, I am staying away from them. That’s why I have been using Dunlop Championship XD ! Excellent playability and arm friendly along with an economical price. I much rather play with new balls every time out on the court.
Well then according to Dartagnam64, you sir, hate the environment. Rot in He LL.
 
If these balls are bit heavier than other brands and not arm friendly, I am staying away from them. That’s why I have been using Dunlop Championship XD ! Excellent playability and arm friendly along with an economical price. I much rather play with new balls every time out on the court.
Yes, the Triniti are not the ball for you. They come off the stringbed more slowly than the Dunlop Championship XD, and that energy loss goes into impact forces in the frame. Those Dunlop are great! I opened two cans, hit with my son for an hour, and pulled them out several days later to play 90 minutes again with them. They were pretty dead at the end of that second session but even after sitting out for several days, still had their bounce. Possibly only the Pro Penn Marathons would last like that. And the Dunlops are $1.94 a can at Walmart.

The Triniti will have a place in my racquet bag though. It mimics playing on slower courts much like playing with partly dead balls do, only in this case you have a regular height bounce to go along with the slower forward bounce. It helps me generate more penetrating shots more consistently because I have to swing in a more committed fashion. Going from a session with the Triniti to new pressurized balls and I feel like I can more easily and confidently create aggressive swings.
 

Wheelz

Rookie
Seems like decent practice balls but at the price of premium. I didn't mind them too much but my partners never wanted to hit with them. I didn't really feel like they lasted that much longer....longer than US Open but not other good playing balls.
 

Dartagnan64

Legend
Wow. Really? So I don't care about the environment because I don't like balls that play different and come in a cardboard sleeve? smh Whatever makes you feel better than someone else dude.
Not really what I said. I said if you cared you'd try them. Keeping playing with them is an entire different formula that relates to how much you care about your tennis ball performance vs how much you care about the environment and reducing consumables. If we all really cared a ton about the environment we'd be living stone age style, but no one is going to make those kinds of sacrifices in a modern world.

I do think that any environmentally concerned tennis player should have some issues with opening a new plastic can of balls and disposing of them and the container after each match. How you approach those concerns can include a number of strategies one of which is Wilson triniti balls. But I have also used high quality balls with pressurizer cans to make them last longer. That's also a legitimate strategy to reduce waste. As is re-purposing old tennis balls as dog toys, hopper balls, door stops, etc. Every little bit counts.
 

1HBHfanatic

Hall of Fame
I'm thinking they'd be good for a basket of serve practice balls?
I told my indoor club, this very thing ^^
these balls are good long lasting options for a indoor court scenario
indoor courts stay cleaner than outside, so no chance of it picking up dirt and changing the color of the ball for the long duration (I had this issue playing outside with them),,
 

Dartagnan64

Legend
I'm thinking they'd be good for a basket of serve practice balls?
Yes. our club is heavily promoting these balls because they make excellent hopper balls for the junior program. All my used ones are going into my service practice basket.

My real hope from these balls is that they encourage more development along these lines. That's why I hope some of you avid players look more into using these balls. Much more likely to see development if the sales are strong than if they are weak.
 

Crocodile

Hall of Fame
I've been coaching with the triniti for almost 2 weeks and the feedback that Im getting is that it feels hard and sounds loud.
Over the week the ball tends to look smaller and the felt gets shorter almost like a bald ball. It's quite bouncy and it seems to dart off the synthetic grass surface. Lot of balls are going over the fence as players are having trouble controlling this ball.
 

bigdaddyps

Semi-Pro
I am deeply concerned about the environment.
Go back to packaging tennis balls in tin cans. There’s a simple solution. That’s how they used to be sold. Bring it back. Soon.
 

1HBHfanatic

Hall of Fame
I've been coaching with the triniti for almost 2 weeks and the feedback that Im getting is that it feels hard and sounds loud.
Over the week the ball tends to look smaller and the felt gets shorter almost like a bald ball. It's quite bouncy and it seems to dart off the synthetic grass surface. Lot of balls are going over the fence as players are having trouble controlling this ball.
what about the color of the balls?
this was my issue, it got dirty after about 5 hits with it
people dont like hitting with green/dark balls, hard to see, what about you???
 

Crocodile

Hall of Fame
what about the color of the balls?
this was my issue, it got dirty after about 5 hits with it
people dont like hitting with green/dark balls, hard to see, what about you???
I didn't have any problems with the colour as I was on synthetic grass but maybe on clay or certain hard courts things might be different.
 

marceloriosfan

New User
I've hit with them three times on a nice outdoor hard court.

My review so far: somewhere in between a normal ball and a tretorn. Different enough in feel (harder and heavier) and sound (weirdly louder?) that I know I don't love it, but not so bad that I would refuse to play with it. The first two days (1 hour of singles drilling) the ball was really bouncy, seemed better on the 3rd day.

I will keep US Open as my preferred ball. If I was a coach or needed a bucket of balls for practice, I could see the Trinity making sense.
 
what about the color of the balls?
this was my issue, it got dirty after about 5 hits with it
people dont like hitting with green/dark balls, hard to see, what about you???
I have been testing these balls for a Wilson employee since early this year. I posted this picture a few months ago of the Triniti balls that we had put through our playtest. Some of these balls have nine hours of play in them, on indoor hard courts, and have not picked up dirt any more than any other ball.

 
I've hit with them three times on a nice outdoor hard court.

My review so far: somewhere in between a normal ball and a tretorn. Different enough in feel (harder and heavier) and sound (weirdly louder?) that I know I don't love it, but not so bad that I would refuse to play with it. The first two days (1 hour of singles drilling) the ball was really bouncy, seemed better on the 3rd day.

I will keep US Open as my preferred ball. If I was a coach or needed a bucket of balls for practice, I could see the Trinity making sense.
That describes my impressions of the balls as well. I've had the opportunity to play them from cooler spring conditions, through the summer, and now into cold conditions and the thing that is best about them is that the bounce is relatively unchanged due to temperature, as is really the response off the strings.

My impression is that the forward bounce speed is pretty similar to newly opened US Open balls. There are balls which scoot faster off the bounce, like the Pro Penn Marathons, and some that fluff up a lot like the Dunlop ATPs. The Triniti balls seem like a middle ground in terms of speed of bounce, but are definitely on the higher end in terms of bounce height.

They do make a very distinctive, high pitched thwack when you mis-hit them. And as practice balls for a bunch of us older guys who are trying to retain what racquet head speed we have, they are great. You can swing hard at them and they don't come off the strings as fast, which makes it possible to really swing away and still keep the ball in control. It's kind of natural to pull back a bit when playing an actual match that counts, and if that is then done with a regular pressurized and faster ball, it seems to be that sweet spot where our level of play has improved.
 

tennis347

Semi-Pro
I finally had a chance to hit with the Triniti balls. They are the heaviest balls that I ever played with and they feel like hitting a stone. No feel and they are hard to control for hard hitting. I would hate to play with a pusher these Triniti balls. I know that the marketing concept behind them is to protect the environment but they are horrible to play with IMO. This balls will wreck your arm especially if you play with poly strings too.
 
I finally had a chance to hit with the Triniti balls. They are the heaviest balls that I ever played with and they feel like hitting a stone. No feel and they are hard to control for hard hitting. I would hate to play with a pusher these Triniti balls. I know that the marketing concept behind them is to protect the environment but they are horrible to play with IMO. This balls will wreck your arm especially if you play with poly strings too.
A little different take on this. I weighed the Triniti balls and they are within spec and not much different than ordinary pressurized balls. The heavy feeling is due, IMO, to the fact that they do absorb more energy than a pressurized ball. However, in my use, I find them to be very consistent and accurate go where the racquet is directing them. This may not be where I'm trying to hit it, but I get clear feedback if my timing or contact isn't perfect, and in those cases the Triniti react exactly like I would expect them to. This has been a pretty common theme from the vast majority of players I know who have also tested them.

As far as playing a defensive player with them, or playing with a full bed of poly, I believe all of my testing with them has been against players using a full bed of poly, and I play a full bed of poly myself as well. It requires a faster swing to get the same ball speed as a pressurized ball so it will exacerbate arm/joint issues. Playing defensive players is different but not necessarily harder. It is more difficult to clean hit a ball past them, but the higher bounce can be used to create more issues for them. The slower incoming bounce also gives more time to practice hitting these penetrating shots, so that when moving back to pressurized balls, these attacking aspects seem much easier.

Undoubtedly, the Triniti balls play a little differently, and that may affect some players more than others, both in physical aspects of hitting the ball as well as the psychological aspects of the expectations of hitting a ball. But I honestly don't find the change in play to be much different than if I were to play on a very slow court, or a court with a different court surface like clay, and you could say the same thing about not wanting to use a full bed of poly or play a defensive player on a slow or clay court.
 

tennis347

Semi-Pro
A little different take on this. I weighed the Triniti balls and they are within spec and not much different than ordinary pressurized balls. The heavy feeling is due, IMO, to the fact that they do absorb more energy than a pressurized ball. However, in my use, I find them to be very consistent and accurate go where the racquet is directing them. This may not be where I'm trying to hit it, but I get clear feedback if my timing or contact isn't perfect, and in those cases the Triniti react exactly like I would expect them to. This has been a pretty common theme from the vast majority of players I know who have also tested them.

As far as playing a defensive player with them, or playing with a full bed of poly, I believe all of my testing with them has been against players using a full bed of poly, and I play a full bed of poly myself as well. It requires a faster swing to get the same ball speed as a pressurized ball so it will exacerbate arm/joint issues. Playing defensive players is different but not necessarily harder. It is more difficult to clean hit a ball past them, but the higher bounce can be used to create more issues for them. The slower incoming bounce also gives more time to practice hitting these penetrating shots, so that when moving back to pressurized balls, these attacking aspects seem much easier.

Undoubtedly, the Triniti balls play a little differently, and that may affect some players more than others, both in physical aspects of hitting the ball as well as the psychological aspects of the expectations of hitting a ball. But I honestly don't find the change in play to be much different than if I were to play on a very slow court, or a court with a different court surface like clay, and you could say the same thing about not wanting to use a full bed of poly or play a defensive player on a slow or clay court.
I agree that you have to swing harder to get the same amount of pace with other types of tennis balls. I just really disliked the feel of the Triniti ball. I have been playing with Dunlop ATP Championships XD for a while which is a good ball IMO. It's much easier to get pace and depth with the Dunlop ball as well as much easier on the arm. I have had some elbow and shoulder issues from the all years of playing. Like you said, playing with these Triniti balls could exacerbate any arm issues which I want to stay clear from.
 

Jhreamer

New User
I've had a couple hits with these, and as usual, I'm compelled to show you the results.


My goal here was specifically to test them out in cold (and wet) conditions, and I'll share my thoughts from the video description.

"Testing out some Wilson Triniti tennis balls. One of my bosses at my tennis club helped pitch this project to Wilson before moving back to her managerial position here, so I feel especially attached to it, and perhaps slightly biased.

HOWEVER -- in winter conditions, I believe this ball shines possibly more than normally. On wet courts, its performance and bounce ignore soppiness far better than I've seen with regular balls. Despite frigid temperatures, its bounce is quite high, somewhat near that of fresh regular balls in the summer (and far better than my experience with fresh regular balls in the winter). My playing partner immediately praised their good bounce amidst the conditions. Fluff is almost a non-issue so far, and as many others have pointed out, its playability actually improves over time (despite a heavy, clunky feel in the immediate stages). I do not yet know how they compare to common pressureless balls.

Through our winter play sessions, I will continue to use these same balls and keep note of the effects of wear.

(Also, that first clip forehand is probably my best shot so far in my short time with tennis.)"
 

Kdude

Rookie
Used them yesterday , 6 new trinity for 60 mins no stop. First feeling was they were not as supple ( if that's the right word) as the pressurized balls. They felt harder. Wasn't crazy about hitting with them.
 

1HBHfanatic

Hall of Fame
you gotta remember,, the rubber is 3x thicker than normal balls
the benefit of this ball if how long it lasts!!
not the feeling you get on day1,, but rather on day 4, day 5 and so on

my thoughs, the longer you play, the softer they get; when the trinity balls start to feel like regular penn balls, its time to call it a day (3sets in or so), and the next time you hit its like hitting with a new Dunlop ball all over again
its a good ball machine ball
 
I recently found some Trinity balls that had been used for some unknown period of time, then stashed away hidden in a corner. The balls look like they have probably three hours of play in them already and had probably been sitting for at least two to three months. I hit with them and they still have the same bounce and feel as newer Triniti balls so the degradation while just sitting after being used is very minimal. I'm now keeping these balls in my bag for those times when I might be hitting for just 30 minutes. It's a great ball for that and no worry about wasting a new can of pressurized balls.
 

1HBHfanatic

Hall of Fame
I recently found some Trinity balls that had been used for some unknown period of time, then stashed away hidden in a corner. The balls look like they have probably three hours of play in them already and had probably been sitting for at least two to three months. I hit with them and they still have the same bounce and feel as newer Triniti balls so the degradation while just sitting after being used is very minimal. I'm now keeping these balls in my bag for those times when I might be hitting for just 30 minutes. It's a great ball for that and no worry about wasting a new can of pressurized balls.
couple things to notise
try to feel the difference at the start vs the end of the hitting session
if you get to play a set or match, see who wins more, the server or the returned
these are things i notised about this balls
for me, they get softer as you play them more, next day, same thing
while playing, i notised they are fast, so the server had a much easier time holding serve
 
couple things to notise
try to feel the difference at the start vs the end of the hitting session
if you get to play a set or match, see who wins more, the server or the returned
these are things i notised about this balls
for me, they get softer as you play them more, next day, same thing
while playing, i notised they are fast, so the server had a much easier time holding serve
I notice the same thing about the Triniti when they are about to die. They get soft, only in my experience they play pretty well and then pretty quickly degrade to the point where they aren't that playable. Pressurized balls seem to gradually decline. The Triniti seem to lose their rebound over a 15-30 minute period.

As far as the server, I don't think it's so clearcut. I believe the Triniti balls help a strong server and penalize a weaker server. I feel like I get an extra 6" of bounce height on my first serve and more than that with my second serve, and that's enough difference to get me a few extra missed returns a game. For a weaker server, they sit up more and makes it easier to be aggressive on the return.

Kind of the same with strings. They seem to disadvantage players with round strings because they're harder to put spin on the ball. Players with shaped strings don't seem to lose spin on the ball, and then the high bounce is magnified without the loss of spin.

It might be why I like them. I'm a pretty strong server among my age group peers, and I use shaped poly strings.
 

Heck

Rookie
Hated them. If I want to save the planet then use a scissor to cut the metal ring off the plastic can and toss the plastic into the plastic bin. You get to play with a better feeling ball and save the earth.
 

1HBHfanatic

Hall of Fame
Hated them. If I want to save the planet then use a scissor to cut the metal ring off the plastic can and toss the plastic into the plastic bin. You get to play with a better feeling ball and save the earth.
im with you on this!!, it does not seem "too difficult", to separate the aluminum rim from the plastic can by cutting it!
but that's getting off topic.. tnx
 
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