WILY SENTI AND THE CHOCOLATE FACT THREAD

CHOCOLATE FACTS:

1. THERE ARE MULTIPLE CELEBRATIONS OF CHOCOLATE EACH YEAR.

Holiday makers are constantly on the hunt for a reason to munch on chocolate, so the calendar offers plenty of excuses to buy a bar. July 7 is also Chocolate Day, a nod to the historical tradition that the day marks when chocolate was first brought to Europe on July 7, 1550, though a number of sources argue that it might have hit the continent’s shores as far back as 1504, thanks to Christopher Columbus. Official day or not, we do know that chocolate first arrived in Europe some time in the 16th century. There's also National Milk Chocolate Day on July 28, International Chocolate Day on September 13, and, of course, National Bittersweet Chocolate With Almonds Day on November 7.

2. CHOCOLATE IS ACTUALLY A VEGETABLE—KIND OF.
Milk and dark chocolate come from the cacao bean, which grows on the cacao tree (Theobroma cacao), an evergreen from the family Malvaceae(other members of the family include okra and cotton). This makes the most important part of the sweet treat a vegetable.

3. WHITE CHOCOLATE IS NOT CHOCOLATE.
Because it doesn't contain cocoa solids or chocolate liquor, white chocolate isn't chocolate in the strict sense. But it does contain parts of the cacao bean—mainly cocoa butter.

4. THE CACAO BEAN IS NATIVE TO MEXICO AND BOTH CENTRAL AND SOUTH AMERICA.
It’s believed that inhabitants of these areas first started cultivating the bean as far back as 1250 BCE, and perhaps even earlier.

5. HOT CHOCOLATE WAS THE FIRST CHOCOLATE TREAT.
Cacao was brewed in both Mexican and Aztec culture, though the result was nothing like today’s hot chocolate—it was a typically bitter concoction that was often used for ceremonial occasions like weddings.

6. MARIE ANTOINETTE LOVED HOT CHOCOLATE (THE MODERN KIND).
Marie didn’t just love cake, she also loved chocolate, and hot chocolate was frequently served at the Palace of Versailles. It wasn’t just the taste everyone loved—it was also believed that the drink was an aphrodisiac.

7. CACAO WAS ONCE USED AS CURRENCY.
The Aztecs loved and valued the cacao bean so highly that they used it as currency during the height of their civilization.

8. SPANISH FRIARS HELPED SPREAD THE LOVE.
After cacao and chocolate were introduced to Europe, traveling Spanish friars took it to various monasteries, handily spreading it around the continent.

9. A PAIR OF BRITISH CONFECTIONERS INVENTED SOLID CHOCOLATE.
The Fry and Sons shop concocted what they called “eating chocolate” in 1847 by combining cocoa butter, sugar, and chocolate liquor. This was a grainy, solid form of the treat.

10. COCOA AND CACAO ARE THE SAME THING.
The words are interchangeable! It’s all one bean.

11. NAPOLEON LOVED CHOCOLATE.
The French leader demanded that wine and chocolate be made available to him and his senior advisers even during intense military campaigns.

12. BAKER'S CHOCOLATE ISN’T JUST FOR BAKING.
Dr. James Baker and John Hannon founded their chocolate company—later called Walter Baker Chocolate—in 1765. That’s where the term “Baker's Chocolate” comes from, not to denote chocolate that’s just meant for cooking.

13. MILTON HERSHEY REALLY WAS A CANDY KING.
The Pennsylvania native may be best known for starting The Hershey Chocolate Company in good old Hershey, PA, but he got his start in candy long before hooking up with chocolate. He founded his first company, The Lancaster Caramel Company, when he was 30 years old.

14. MILK CHOCOLATE WAS INVENTED IN SWITZERLAND.
Daniel Peter created the tasty treat in 1875—after eight years of trying to make his recipe work. Condensed milk ended up being the key ingredient.

15. MAKING CHOCOLATE IS HARD WORK.
Despite its regal background and revered status, the cacao bean doesn’t just magically turn into chocolate—it takes about 400 beans to make a single pound of the good stuff.

16. THE FIRST CHOCOLATE BAR WAS MADE IN ENGLAND.
Way back in 1842, the Cadbury company made the very first chocolate bar. The company is still in existence, and is perhaps most famous for their delightful Easter-themed treats.

17. MOST CACAO IS NOW GROWN IN AFRICA.
Despite its Amazonian roots, most cacao—nearly 70 percent of the world’s supply—comes from Africa. The Ivory Coast is the largest single producer, providing about 30 percent of all the world’s cacao.

18. CACAO TREES CAN LIVE TO BE 200 YEARS OLD.
That may sound impressive, but the tropical beauties only make viable cacao beans for just 25 years of their lifespan.

19. THERE ARE TWO KINDS OF CACAO.
Most modern chocolate comes from forastero beans, which are considered easy to grow—though the crillo bean is believed to make much tastier chocolate.

20. CHOCOLATE HAS A SPECIAL MELTING POINT.
Chocolate is the only edible substance to melt around 93° F, just below the human body temperature. That’s why chocolate melts so easily on your tongue.

21. @Sentinel LOVES CHOCOLATE.
http://mentalfloss.com/article/57507/20-things-you-never-knew-about-chocolate
 
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Tennis_Hands

Talk Tennis Guru
> 1/3rd of the world's cocoa production comes from the Ivory Coast, West Africa.
> 2/3rds of the entire world's cocoa production comes from West Africa (Ivory Coast, Nigeria, Ghana, Cameroon, Sierra Leone, Togo)
> the industry is worth 100 bn dollars
> the farmers at the Ivory Coast make 50 cent per day (extreme poverty threshold 1.90 USD/day)
> 2.1 mil children between 5 and 14 are employed as cocoa harvesters in West Africa
> 11 000 children from Mali are abducted to work on the cocoa plantations
> Cadbury was the first company that was involved in a scandal involving child labor abuse in West Africa
> the modern chocolate is so cheap thanks to the shift from South America to West Africa and Indonesia as the main source of cocoa and the said slavery/child abuse practices

:cool:
 
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Lleytonstation

Hall of Fame
> 1/3rd of the world's cocoa production comes from the Ivory Coast, West Africa.
> 2/3rds of the entire world's cocoa production comes from West Africa (Ivory Coast, Nigeria, Ghana, Cameroon, Togo)
> the industry is worth 100 bn dollars
> the farmers at the Ivory Coast make 50 cent per day (extreme poverty threshold 1.90 USD/day)
> 2.1 mil children between 5 and 14 are employed as cocoa harvesters in West Africa
> 11 000 children from Mali are abducted to work on the cocoa plantations
> Cadbury was the firs company that was involved with a scandal involving child labor abuse in West Africa
> the modern chocolate is so cheap thanks to the shirt from South America to West Africa and Malaysia as the main source of cocoa and the said slavery/child abuse practices

:cool:
You could have just waited for @dgold44 to have a say. You stole his thunder...
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
> 1/3rd of the world's cocoa production comes from the Ivory Coast, West Africa.
> 2/3rds of the entire world's cocoa production comes from West Africa (Ivory Coast, Nigeria, Ghana, Cameroon, Sierra Leone, Togo)
> the industry is worth 100 bn dollars
> the farmers at the Ivory Coast make 50 cent per day (extreme poverty threshold 1.90 USD/day)
> 2.1 mil children between 5 and 14 are employed as cocoa harvesters in West Africa
> 11 000 children from Mali are abducted to work on the cocoa plantations
> Cadbury was the firs company that was involved in a scandal involving child labor abuse in West Africa
> the modern chocolate is so cheap thanks to the shift from South America to West Africa and Indonesia as the main source of cocoa and the said slavery/child abuse practices

:cool:
Sounds as rough as the blood diamond trade.
 

dgold44

G.O.A.T.
You could have just waited for @dgold44 to have a say. You stole his thunder...
Damn little hands stole my thunder but not my lighting !!!
Well I will have to turn up the voltage next time as I have plenty of storm clouds floating around in my brain
Living in such a wonderful city of such high sophistication and class where sucking your parasitic lips on a ketchup bottle at a public restaurant with your feet up and shoes off is standard behavior makes me wish I could fall asleep for good
 
I haven't eaten chocolate in a while and now I am supposed to feel guilty if i ever consume it in future ?

(off sweets to manage my sugar levels. I think it's time to take another HbA1C and see if things have improved)
As a vegetarian, make sure you are getting enough protein. This isn't just important for body maintenance and building muscles, but it helps with your blood sugar levels. You need a good protein-to-carb ratio. Also, keep in mind that fruit juices are very high in sugars, because of the concentration of fruits in the drink.

Did you check your thyroid levels regarding weight maintenance? It's an easy blood test. Also, I have learned that it is easy for vegetarians to become low on vitamins like B-!2, and iron. Taking supplements helps with this, and Vitamin C helps with the absorption of iron.
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
Don't feel guilty about eating chocolate. Eat responsibly and from verified sources that handle in Fair trade products.

:cool:
My HbA1C was 5.1 last year, it became 5.5 and now 5.7. So i am trying to bring it down by cutting down sugar, and walking more.
Also i was having sleep problems a couple months back (you must remember that thread), and i am very sensitive to caffiene, so I thought i'd give a break to the chocolate.
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
As a vegetarian, make sure you are getting enough protein. This isn't just important for body maintenance and building muscles, but it helps with your blood sugar levels. You need a good protein-to-carb ratio. Also, keep in mind that fruit juices are very high in sugars, because of the concentration of fruits in the drink.

Did you check your thyroid levels regarding weight maintenance? It's an easy blood test. Also, I have learned that it is easy for vegetarians to become low on vitamins like B-!2, and iron. Taking supplements helps with this, and Vitamin C helps with the absorption of iron.
I have never understood the American obsession with protein :D :D
I do have quite a bit of yogurt, and lentils.
I don't have fruit juices, and I barely get to have one or two pieces of fruit a day.

My yearly blood test does include thyroid which is normal. That was one concern due to my low weight.

I am actually wondering what the high calorie foods are, since it seems everything I am eating is low calorie. Fruit, veggies, yogurt. I do have butter and ghee but just enough, never oodles.
 

Big_Dangerous

Talk Tennis Guru
"You will always return to your dark master - The Cocoa Bean!"

Bosco! George's ATM Code. :-D

They still make it today too, but it's hard to find in Texas. I think it's more of a North Eastern brand. I can find Nestle, Hershey's, and a few other chocolate syrups (I really like Walden Farms zero calorie chocolate syrup) in stores here, but Bosco, I don't think I've ever seen in stores near me.
 
Is it true that Cadbury you buy in America is highly inferior to the Cadbury in the UK?
My Dad worked at an embassy in Asia when I was a kid, and all the Americans loved to make trips to Hong Kong to stock up on British candy. I lost count of how many times I have taken my Mom to Brit shops and World Imports in California to find her favourite British candies.

Why British And American Chocolate Taste Different
Dina Spector
Jan. 27, 2015, 12:17 PM

Chocolate moves down the production line at the Cadbury factory in Birmingham, England. AP Photo/Simon Dawson, File British and American chocolate may look similar, but they taste very different.

American chocolate tastes "powdery," one British colleague tells me. It's "too sweet," another protests.

British chocolate, on the other hand, is said to be richer and smoother.

The flavor distinctions aren't imaginary. They are tied to differences in recipes and manufacturing, depending on which side of the pond you're on.
British chocolate tends to have a higher fat and cocoa content. American-made chocolate typically contains a larger dose of sugar.

According to UK rules, a product must contain no less than 25% cocoa solids to be considered "milk chocolate." The US stipulates that milk chocolate must contain no less than 10% chocolate liquor.

The differences between Cadbury Dairy Milk bars made in Britain and the ones sold in the US, manufactured in America by Hershey, were highlighted in a 2007 New York Times article by Kim Severson.

"According to the label, a British Cadbury Dairy Milk bar contains milk, sugar, cocoa mass, cocoa butter, vegetable fat and emulsifiers," Severson wrote. The Hershey version, on the other hand, lists sugar as its first ingredient. Its list also includes "lactose and the emulsifier soy lecithin, which keeps the cocoa butter from separating from the cocoa."

Cadbury is a British company based in Birmingham, England. However, the Hershey Company holds the rights to manufacture Cadbury chocolate products in the US. Under this license, Hershey is allowed to tweak the recipe.

Tony Bilsborough, a spokesman for Cadbury, told Severson that Cadbury ships to Hershey's Pennsylvania factories a special mix of mashed dried milk, chocolate, and cocoa butter. Hershey takes it from there.

"I imagine [the taste comes] down to the final processing and the blending," Bilsborough told The New York Times.

These flavor differences have become a source of stress among Americans who prefer British chocolate, after Hershey's struck a deal last week with an importer of British products to prevent Cadbury chocolates made in Britain from entering the US.

As part of the agreement, Let's Buy British Imports, which brings British chocolate into the US, will also stop importing British Kit Kat bars, Toffee Crisps, and Yorkie chocolate bars.

American advocates of British chocolate aren't taking the news well. A petition on MoveOn.org to end the Hershey ban has nearly 15,000 signatures.

https://www.businessinsider.com/why-british-and-american-chocolate-taste-different-2015-1
 

Sudacafan

G.O.A.T.
> 1/3rd of the world's cocoa production comes from the Ivory Coast, West Africa.
> 2/3rds of the entire world's cocoa production comes from West Africa (Ivory Coast, Nigeria, Ghana, Cameroon, Sierra Leone, Togo)
> the industry is worth 100 bn dollars
> the farmers at the Ivory Coast make 50 cent per day (extreme poverty threshold 1.90 USD/day)
> 2.1 mil children between 5 and 14 are employed as cocoa harvesters in West Africa
> 11 000 children from Mali are abducted to work on the cocoa plantations
> Cadbury was the first company that was involved in a scandal involving child labor abuse in West Africa
> the modern chocolate is so cheap thanks to the shift from South America to West Africa and Indonesia as the main source of cocoa and the said slavery/child abuse practices

:cool:
Senti should be awfully ashamed.
 

Azure

Hall of Fame
Like button never existed. You better believe that, they told me in Likeists Anonymous.
Meh, no worries. I will still reply to posts that deserve a response. In many cases the like button was used to acknowledge to have read the post. Now I can't do that. That is possibly the only drawback I see.
 

Sudacafan

G.O.A.T.
Meh, no worries. I will still reply to posts that deserve a response. In many cases the like button was used to acknowledge to have read the post. Now I can't do that. That is possibly the only drawback I see.
Will you ever be sure again that I read your posts if I don’t quote them?
 

Azure

Hall of Fame
Will you ever be sure again that I read your posts if I don’t quote them?
I can still manage if it's you. What about my self confidence if Shresh does not read my posts? He never gave the like though, so I can survive.
 
Surprising graphic when you consider the obesity epidemic in The United States. I guess Americans are more apt to consume more of the other unhealthy foods.
I think the big issue in America is quantity, starches and sugars like corn syrup (Cokes, Doritos, etc.), and a lack of exercise. I have had so many Europeans tell me that they are astonished by the serving sizes at American restaurants. Obesity is also an increasing problem in Europe. I know that younger Danes are heavier and less fit than previous generations. I have heard this trend is also true in India and China.
 

Big_Dangerous

Talk Tennis Guru
I think the big issue in America is quantity, starches and sugars like corn syrup (Cokes, Doritos, etc.), and a lack of exercise. I have had so many Europeans tell me that they are astonished by the serving sizes at American restaurants. Obesity is also an increasing problem in Europe. I know that younger Danes are heavier and less fit than previous generations. I have heard this trend is also true in India and China.
100% agreed. Not to mention the difference in lifestyle. In the US, we tend to drive way more often, while Europeans do far more walking, biking, etc. It's amazing how people will literally wait for a parking space to open up, when it would have been faster to take the first available space and just walk the extra few yards. It's just like mindless laziness that I can't stand seeing.
 
100% agreed. Not to mention the difference in lifestyle. In the US, we tend to drive way more often, while Europeans do far more walking, biking, etc. It's amazing how people will literally wait for a parking space to open up, when it would have been faster to take the first available space and just walk the extra few yards. It's just like mindless laziness that I can't stand seeing.
I agree. Walking and just moving around more would make a big difference. European cities are designed for walking. L.A. is absolutely not a city for walking. People almost seem embarrassed to be seen walking. A lot of people even rely on valets for restaurants so they only have a few feet to walk to the entrance.

 

randomtoss

Semi-Pro
+1

Which is true because I really am Swiss.

In my house we eat chocolate every day, usually one or two small squares of organic dark chocolate with our post evening meal espresso - and sometimes a small piece of Lindt 99% as a tribute to our buddy @stringertom :)
 

Big_Dangerous

Talk Tennis Guru
+1

Which is true because I really am Swiss.

In my house we eat chocolate every day, usually one or two small squares of organic dark chocolate with our post evening meal espresso - and sometimes a small piece of Lindt 99% as a tribute to our buddy @stringertom :)
99% Lindt? o_O That has to be bitter af! I could maybe do 72%, but even that is about as high as I go.
 

Tennis_Hands

Talk Tennis Guru
99% Lindt? o_O That has to be bitter af! I could maybe do 72%, but even that is about as high as I go.
It is sold in bars of 50 grams. It basically is dehydrated cocoa powder in a solid state. Terribly bitter and powdery. I can't imagine someone eating that on its own. Makes a nice hot chocolate with some honey or similar added to it though.

:cool:
 
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