Winter Arctic Tennis Balls

LOBALOT

Hall of Fame
I am all set for "real tennis balls" to get me through the Fall and perhaps into the Spring as I have over 2 cases of Wilson US Open Extra Duty Balls in my basement.

That said I need to prep for winter tennis and I need some help in identifying a suitable case of tennis balls for that purpose.

By winter tennis I mean if it is above 35 degrees and dry and relatively wind-free we are outside playing tennis under the lights in the northern middle of the west. We are mostly getting exercise but in the end it is to keep social interactions going, grab a post match beer after play, and for surviving another season of less social interaction than we are used to.

When we hit last year during "the meat of the winter season" a fresh can of balls lasted about 10 minutes before they didn't bounce for %$#% due to the frigid temperatures. I am not spending $120 for a case of balls for that purpose.

Any thoughts on something I should look for?

I am thinking something cheap and not extra duty as perhaps I can get a bit better bounce. My pals are going to Costco. Maybe that is the best option.

I am thinking Dunlop Grand Prix regular Duty but I am sure some of you have better ideas. Thanks for your help.
 

dkmura

Rookie
I'm in Colorado and use regular altitude tennis balls at our 5,200 altitude in winter. Depending on your location, pressureless balls might be an option.
 

BenC

Semi-Pro
Aren't those crazy expensive?
They bounce forever. Their limiting factor is how bald the felt gets before you get sick of them.

edit: not saying I like them - they feel like rocks especially when the felt is gone and I had to drop string tension to compensate. However, I have 3 from last winter and they still bounce higher than fresh out-of-the-can Penn Champs and Penn Tours.
 
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LOBALOT

Hall of Fame
I'm in Colorado and use regular altitude tennis balls at our 5,200 altitude in winter. Depending on your location, pressureless balls might be an option.
I was wondering about that or green dot but aren't high altitude balls designed to bounce less?

As such they would bounce even less and then add the cold it will be bouncing even less.

Same with green dot... they are designed to bounce lower for short 10U kids.
 

LOBALOT

Hall of Fame
They bounce forever. Their limiting factor is how bald the felt gets before you get sick of them.

edit: not saying I like them - they feel like rocks especially when the felt is gone and I had to drop string tension to compensate. However, I have 3 from last winter and they still bounce higher than fresh out-of-the-can Penn Champs and Penn Tours.
Thank you Ben, I have hit with them once and they were interesting. I will buy a "can/box" or two and see if this is a long term solution.
 

dkmura

Rookie
I was wondering about that or green dot but aren't high altitude balls designed to bounce less?

As such they would bounce even less and then add the cold it will be bouncing even less.

Same with green dot... they are designed to bounce lower for short 10U kids.
Yes, high-altitude balls bounce less in cold weather. But low altitude balls bounce HIGHER in Denver during cold weather, so they work better during winter weather. That's why I suggested it, but you didn't mention where (and at what altitude) you're at.
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
If it gets really cold, ie 32 °F, regular sea level pressurized tennis balls are better than high altitude balls. If you have a ball pressurizer, jacking the pressure up to 32 psi is even better.
 

Pctopcool

Rookie
I guess the key is not to let the ball sit on the ground for too long. Always pick them up and keep in the pocket. As to the most bouncy ball for winter, my experience is propenn marathon> us open >> Penn tour =any championship balls.
 

struggle

Legend
Maybe crazy, but what about the highest end (age group) of those junior balls? They may firm up just about right in the cold weather?

Certainly someone has tried this...
 

Tennisist

Semi-Pro
Tretorn Micro X. They bounce great even at 30°F / -1°C.
They do feel different from regular balls -- harder. But we take that. Still feels like regular tennis.
Way better than playing with dead balls which do not bounce.
I've tried other pressureless balls - but they are considerably harder.
 

Manute Bol

New User
The issue is not the balls, it’s the cold. I suggest you rotate between two cans: one can kept inside by the heater. I’ve never done it personally but I know some people who did it.
 

LOBALOT

Hall of Fame
Also, you should re-string at least a couple of lbs. looser to allow for the cold's effect on your strings.
....
Thanks, yes, we all have winter setups. Ironically, I am at a conference North of Atlanta this week and the weather is fantastic!
 
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