WISE 2086????

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
I imagine you're the only person who has ever run into that limitation. ;)

Love mine too.
Yeah!!! The YMMV was a joke of sorts.

Wise is fantastic. Grew up on a prince pneumatic and the wise is far superior.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Yeah!!! The YMMV was a joke of sorts.

Wise is fantastic. Grew up on a prince pneumatic and the wise is far superior.
One of my first machines was a Prince MP100 pneumatic then lockouts then I added the Wise. The Wise is far better than the MP100 and the lockout in some respects. But I think you're overlooking the capabilities of your Gamma lock out. Yes it is limited by the 90# top tension but what if the Gamma were were maladjusted so you were limited by how much pressure you could put on the crank? Oops there goes another rubber tree or a set of string as you tension them to 100+#. LOL

The advantage of a constant pull is it pulls at the save tension over and over again it DOES NOT PULL CONSTANTLY. It pulls and stops (holding the string until it relaxes like a lockout) then it pulls again until you clamp the string. Can't you do the same with a lockout just not automatically as fast?
 

McLovin

Legend
Three years into my 2086, and have no idea how I lasted so many years w/o one.

One thing you will notice is you will likely have to drop the tension on the Wise to achieve similar tension from your previous machine, assuming it was a drop weight or lockout. I was coming from a drop weight and had to drop the Wise 4lbs to get similar numbers (used RacquetTune as my reference point).

I assume this would be the case coming from any non-constant pull.
 

gmatheis

Hall of Fame
Three years into my 2086, and have no idea how I lasted so many years w/o one.

One thing you will notice is you will likely have to drop the tension on the Wise to achieve similar tension from your previous machine, assuming it was a drop weight or lockout. I was coming from a drop weight and had to drop the Wise 4lbs to get similar numbers (used RacquetTune as my reference point).

I assume this would be the case coming from any non-constant pull.
Drop weight is the original constant pull. Shouldn't need to adjust between a wise and a drop weight unless one of them isn't calibrated correctly. Lockout to wise I can understand.
 

McLovin

Legend
Drop weight is the original constant pull. Shouldn't need to adjust between a wise and a drop weight unless one of them isn't calibrated correctly. Lockout to wise I can understand.
Not true. Drop Weight is only 'constant pull' if the arm is at 90 degrees (unless we're talking about a StringWay drop weight). But it can't adjust as the string stretches. You would have to constantly lift the bar & reset it to just above 90 and let it drop to 90 again...and again...and again, because anything above 90 or below 90 is no longer the desired tension.

If you've ever used an electronic machine, you'd know that it constantly adjusts after hitting the desired tension. That is why the string bed ends up registering tighter.
 

GlennK

Rookie
The advantage of a constant pull is it pulls at the save tension over and over again it DOES NOT PULL CONSTANTLY. It pulls and stops (holding the string until it relaxes like a lockout) then it pulls again until you clamp the string. Can't you do the same with a lockout just not automatically as fast?
If you've ever used an electronic machine, you'd know that it constantly adjusts after hitting the desired tension. That is why the string bed ends up registering tighter.
These two posts read as opposites to me. Does the Wise tensioner continue to pull tighter as the string is stretched in order to keep up the "set" tension? I was thinking of upgrading my Gamma x-st already by adding the wise but if releasing and cranking a second time on a lockout (I believe Irvin posted a video showing how this did pull more string through) can accomplish the same thing as a machine pre-stretch of the Wise, than I do not mind the extra time needed.
 

McLovin

Legend
Don't think they are opposites, just worded differently. In my case, the Wise pulls up to the desired tension (or past it if you have 'pre-stretch'), then it 'adjusts' as the string continues to stretch. I can hear/see the tension head moving until I clamp the string & release it. So if my desired tension is 50, it will pull up to 50. At that point, if I do nothing, I will see the head constantly moving back & forth a tiny sliver, and see the digital readout jump from 49.7 to 50.1 to 49.8 to 50 to 49.8...until I clamp & release.

At some point it might stop jumping, and I'm certain the amount of adjustment is dependent upon the string's characteristics, but I've seen this behavior on the major three types (poly, natural gut, multi). Have not strung Kevlar in a while, so don't know about that.
 

GlennK

Rookie
Don't think they are opposites, just worded differently. In my case, the Wise pulls up to the desired tension (or past it if you have 'pre-stretch'), then it 'adjusts' as the string continues to stretch. I can hear/see the tension head moving until I clamp the string & release it. So if my desired tension is 50, it will pull up to 50. At that point, if I do nothing, I will see the head constantly moving back & forth a tiny sliver, and see the digital readout jump from 49.7 to 50.1 to 49.8 to 50 to 49.8...until I clamp & release.

At some point it might stop jumping, and I'm certain the amount of adjustment is dependent upon the string's characteristics, but I've seen this behavior on the major three types (poly, natural gut, multi). Have not strung Kevlar in a while, so don't know about that.
Thanks McLovin. I went back and watched the video I referenced above and Irvin does talk about the electronic tensioner constantly pulling as the string stretches. I simply misunderstood his post here.
 

ten11

Semi-Pro
Three years into my 2086, and have no idea how I lasted so many years w/o one.
Is it really that good? (I saw wise in FS section from time to time. If it is that good, I ask myself why it ever show up in FS section. I guess depends on people.)

I strung first few years without a starting clamp. Once I got one and used for a while, I will declare "how I lasted so many years w/o one". Is it really that good in compare to starting clamp? Can you give some details?
 

McLovin

Legend
Is it really that good?
For me, yes. But I was coming from an Alpha drop-weight that I used for 20 years. I assume it would be the same going from any drop-weight to any electronic machine.

Going from crank -> electronic might not be as dramatic an improvement. It also comes down to how many frames your string per day. For me it averages to around one a day, but I can go two weeks with nothing, then get bombarded for a week w/ 20 frames.

Such is the life of a home stringer...
 

McLovin

Legend
And yes, I realize for some of you, 20 frames in 1 week is not considered a 'bombardment'. But when you have a regular job that involves a hefty commute, kids you need to cart around, and other activities (e.g., soccer, yard work, etc.), finding the spare hour or two to knock out some frames can be tough.
 

ten11

Semi-Pro
I strung much less than that. I probably do 100 a year on neos 1000. Do you think it is worth a while to get one? Most I have done is three a night and that only happen once or twice a year. it took me less than 30 minutes per racket from taking out the broken strings to finish on neos. I am not sure if I can get any faster than that with wise.

By the way, does anyone know what is the difference between the first and later generation of the wise tension head?
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
These two posts read as opposites to me. Does the Wise tensioner continue to pull tighter as the string is stretched in order to keep up the "set" tension? I was thinking of upgrading my Gamma x-st already by adding the wise but if releasing and cranking a second time on a lockout (I believe Irvin posted a video showing how this did pull more string through) can accomplish the same thing as a machine pre-stretch of the Wise, than I do not mind the extra time needed.
With an electronic tensioner it pulls farther until the set tension is attained then it locks out. Some electronic machine have more Overpull than others. Once the tensioner locks out the string relaxes and when the tensioner recognizes the tension has fallen a certain amount the tensioner starts stretching the storm ore to increase the tension. And the cycle repeats until the string is clamped and the tensioner disengaged.
 

Muppet

Legend
Drop weights are not really true constant pull either. If you lower the arm and need to pick it up to adjust it closer to horizontal, you have tensioned two times and the string was allowed to relax a bit while the clutch locked it out.
 

jim e

Legend
Drop weights are not really true constant pull either. If you lower the arm and need to pick it up to adjust it closer to horizontal, you have tensioned two times and the string was allowed to relax a bit while the clutch locked it out.
Not all drop weights have an arm to make horizontal. I still have my old Serrano machine that I used back in the 1960's although I no longer use that old machine, it has a foot peddle to lift the weight, and it automatically pulled proper tension without anything needing to be horizontal, and that machine is a drop weight, and a true constant pull. I only once in a while string a wooden racquet with that old machine when one comes by every so often, otherwise I no longer use it.
 

Dags

Hall of Fame
it took me less than 30 minutes per racket from taking out the broken strings to finish on neos. I am not sure if I can get any faster than that with wise.
Speed is only one part of the equation. You are correct in thinking that you probably won't get much quicker with the Wise. However, the other benefits I found:

- economy of movement. Because the tension head doesn't move like the crank does, I found that I didn't have to move so much. This is even after losing the 360 degree rotation.
- I have two hands free to work with. I like to straighten the crosses as I pull tension. You don't have to keep one hand on the tension head like you would with a crank, and it made it much more efficient and easier.
- predictable stringbed. My subjective belief is that the stringbed plays more consistently. This may be because the speed of the tensioner doesn't alter. It may be because I straighten my crosses more efficiently. Or it may be that I just prefer the feeling of constant pull.

Overall, the wise wasn't really a financially driven decision for me, but it's made the process of stringing a racquet more enjoyable. That can be worth more than money.
 

Muppet

Legend
Not all drop weights have an arm to make horizontal. I still have my old Serrano machine that I used back in the 1960's although I no longer use that old machine, it has a foot peddle to lift the weight, and it automatically pulled proper tension without anything needing to be horizontal, and that machine is a drop weight, and a true constant pull. I only once in a while string a wooden racquet with that old machine when one comes by every so often, otherwise I no longer use it.
Yea . . . the Serrano reminds me of the Stringways as well. I'm not bent on speed, so maybe I'll go over to Stringway next time.
 

IceNineTX

Semi-Pro
Totally agree with Dags post above. I went 5 years with a revo 4000 crank and then got a wise. I string maybe 6 a month right now, yet the wise has been worth every penny. It's more enjoyable and I'm more confident in the results.
 

ten11

Semi-Pro
Totally agree with Dags post above. I went 5 years with a revo 4000 crank and then got a wise. I string maybe 6 a month right now, yet the wise has been worth every penny. It's more enjoyable and I'm more confident in the results.
Why more enjoyable? can you be more specific? I string about same amount of rackets as you do so I am interested to hear your input. Thanks.
 

IceNineTX

Semi-Pro
Why more enjoyable? can you be more specific? I string about same amount of rackets as you do so I am interested to hear your input. Thanks.
It's hard to say and may just be the gadget person in me. But there are some annoying things about a crank on the Revo. The dial is a little hard to read so getting it accurate is not easy. There is no memory. The best practice was to release the spring when done and that was annoying. The crank/lockout requires more consistency on timing with the clamping to be consistent. It's also a little clunky. The wise is just all around quicker to operate and lets me focus on everyone else more. Plus it beeps. :)

Can you get quality with a crank? Sure. Though I feel that with the same input, my stringjobs are much better now. Is it mental? Maybe. But others who have checked the racquets agree that it's a better and more consistent stringbed.
 

RasP

New User
I have been stringing on a Wise 2086 on a Pro's Pro XP Plus for about 2,5 years now and I am really fond of it.
Went from an old Tyger crank, but have also been stringing on an electronic Pro's Pro.
The Wise works smother and seems much more accurate.
I have been offered to buy a Babolat 2002 - does anyone know if that is better than the Wise?
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
I couldn't find any reference to the 2002, that would be an older machine and Babolat doesn't support even the Star 4 now. If you bought it, I'm sure it'd be fine but should it break...
 

RasP

New User
Oh, thanks - true, always a risk with older machines, but it seems sturdy and I am mainly considering it out of curiosity. Maybe I'll buy it, try it for a while and then sell either the Wise or the Babolat - depending on my own judgment.
I mostly wanted to find out, if anyone had an idea about which machine is the best - and by "machine" I mean the machine itself. The motor/electronics - the clamps and more are probably better on the Babolat than on the Pro's Pro that my Wise is mounted on.

By the way; the Babolat 2002 is this grey and yellow machine in the first two pictures:
https://www.google.dk/search?q=babo...Q_AUoAWoVChMI35241ZXyyAIV65hyCh0GSg5N&dpr=0.9
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
there are definitely some Babolat aficionados on the boards, Drakulie, Ericsson are both well versed. You might try pinging them.
 
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