Word Association!!

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Aberdeen in Scotland became a boom town when the North Sea gas reserves began to be tapped in the 1970s and onwards. The world’s largest heliport is located there to help service the many offshore oil rigs within copter range of the city.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
John McEnroe: Yankees --->>> Mets

By Alberto Amalfi

(July 14, 2010) New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner was known as "The Boss." John McEnroe took charge in calling the shots on court.

The two New York sports icons, each deeply devoted to winning and both known for volatile tempers, met a few times with Steinbrenner unknowingly altering McEnroe's rooting interest.

McEnroe, who played for the New York Sportimes in Tuesday's World TeamTennis match, reflected on Steinbrenner shortly after he died from a heart attack at age 80 yesterday.

"George, I don't know if we would have gotten on too well if I had worked for him," McEnroe joked in comments published by the Albany Times Union. "We would have butted heads."

The Hall of Famer credited Steinbrenner for an important development in his life — converting him from a Yankee fan to a Mets fan. The Queens native grew up as Mickey Mantle and Yankees fan, but said Steinbrenner's statements after the Dodgers beat the Yankees in six games to win the 1981 World Series prompted him to transfer his allegiance to the Mets.

"(Steinbrenner) apologized to the city for losing four straight (games) after winning the first two," McEnroe told the Albany Times Union. "I had just come off losing a Wimbledon final. And I thought, 'Well, being the runner-up's pretty good,' so I abruptly decided that I was going to switch to be a Mets fan."

McEnroe's NBC and Tennis Channel broadcast partner, (y)Ted Robinson(y), is a former New York Mets play-by-play announcer.
http://www.tennisnow.com/News/John-McEnroe-On-George-Steinbrenner.aspx




 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
John McEnroe: Yankees --->>> Mets

By Alberto Amalfi

(July 14, 2010) New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner was known as "The Boss." John McEnroe took charge in calling the shots on court.

The two New York sports icons, each deeply devoted to winning and both known for volatile tempers, met a few times with Steinbrenner unknowingly altering McEnroe's rooting interest.

McEnroe, who played for the New York Sportimes in Tuesday's World TeamTennis match, reflected on Steinbrenner shortly after he died from a heart attack at age 80 yesterday.

"George, I don't know if we would have gotten on too well if I had worked for him," McEnroe joked in comments published by the Albany Times Union. "We would have butted heads."

The Hall of Famer credited Steinbrenner for an important development in his life — converting him from a Yankee fan to a Mets fan. The Queens native grew up as Mickey Mantle and Yankees fan, but said Steinbrenner's statements after the Dodgers beat the Yankees in six games to win the 1981 World Series prompted him to transfer his allegiance to the Mets.

"(Steinbrenner) apologized to the city for losing four straight (games) after winning the first two," McEnroe told the Albany Times Union. "I had just come off losing a Wimbledon final. And I thought, 'Well, being the runner-up's pretty good,' so I abruptly decided that I was going to switch to be a Mets fan."

McEnroe's NBC and Tennis Channel broadcast partner, (y)Ted Robinson(y), is a former New York Mets play-by-play announcer.
http://www.tennisnow.com/News/John-McEnroe-On-George-Steinbrenner.aspx




Growing up in the shadow of Shea Stadium, young JMac must have been ragged mercilessly for being a Yanks fan. Until his late teens, the Mets were the better team too so he really must have gotten the short end of adolescent rivalries in Douglaston.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Ted Robinson is probably best known for television tennis commentary with John McEnroe, but he has also done radio play-by-play for the S.F. Giants, N.Y. Mets, and 49ers.
Another multi sports announcer that included MLB, NFL and tennis was the legendary Dick Enberg, whose last call before pa.s.sing away in La Jolla CA almost two years ago was an, “Oh my!” after witnessing the GOAT tennis droop volleigh.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
My Sureshs
When you gonna get to me, get to me
It is just a matter of (time Sureshs)
Is it d-d-destiny, d-destiny?
Or is it just a game in my (mind, Sureshs?)
Never gonna stop, give it up, such a dirty mind
Always get it up for the touch of the younger kind
My, my, my, ay, ay, woah!
M-m-m-m-m-m-m-my, my, my, ay, ay, woah!
M-m-m-my Sureshs (Sureshs)
M-m-m-my Sureshs (Sureshs)
M-m-m-my Sureshs (Sureshs)
M-m-m-my Sureshs
Oooaah, my Sureshs
Oooaah, my Sureshs
Oooaah, my Sureshs
Woah!!
 

Vcore89

G.O.A.T.
I am a little confused. That's Anna Lund Sorensen, a very obscure model from Denmark, and she is holding a bag evidently marketed as a doctor's bag. I am curious how you came across this photo, @Vcore89, and what suspect devices she may be hiding inside her bag. What's up with Anna, @Vcore89?

"Confusion"
My Swede and I we're scouring for gift ideas; handbags and came across the doc's bag, which reminded me of Malcolm Forbes: I made my money the old-fashioned way, I was ivery nice to a rwealthy relative right before he died (clutching a bag with who knows what is inside; words inside parenthesis are mine.). I'm pretty sure Marloes wouldn't approve of horstplay in any way, form or shape.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
My Swede and I we're scouring for gift ideas; handbags and came across the doc's bag, which reminded me of Malcolm Forbes: I made my money the old-fashioned way, I was ivery nice to a rwealthy relative right before he died (clutching a bag with who knows what is inside; words inside parenthesis are mine.). I'm pretty sure Marloes wouldn't approve of horstplay in any way, form or shape.
It's funny that I assumed you picked the photo for the model, but you picked it for the bag, and it was just a coincidence that she is from Denmark and I recognized her. For me, the narrative focused on the model, but for you she was just a random woman holding an interesting bag.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
My Swede and I we're scouring for gift ideas; handbags and came across the doc's bag, which reminded me of Malcolm Forbes: I made my money the old-fashioned way, I was ivery nice to a rwealthy relative right before he died (clutching a bag with who knows what is inside; words inside parenthesis are mine.). I'm pretty sure Marloes wouldn't approve of horstplay in any way, form or shape.
Bags full of @Vcore89's inherited cash:



 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Making money the old-fashioned way is a lot harder in ithe current 'gig" or "on-demand job" economy. The rungs in the career ladder seemed to have disappeared (and by that the rungs of LVs we're supposed to be able to afford).
Just have the right connections when things are privatized and become an oligarch.

The rise of Russia's oligarchs — and their bid for legitimacy
ABC Radio National
By Joey Watson for Late Night Live
Updated 1 Jan 2019, 2:59pm

Roman Abramovich is the owner of the Eclipse, which, at 162.5 metres in length, is the world's second largest privately-owned yacht.

The $500 million boat sits alongside a list of possessions that include a multi-million-dollar art collection, a Boeing 767 plane, and the English Premier League football club Chelsea.

Mr Abramovich, like most Russian oligarchs, found his billions in the carve-up of the Soviet Union's industrial assets in the early '90s, through his connections to the Kremlin.

The oligarchs, sitting atop the most unequal economy in the developed world, can seem almost comical to observers in the West.

But beyond their glitzy extravagance, a complex social transformation is taking place, according to sociologist Elisabeth Schimpfossl.

Dr Schimpfossl, who travelled Russia interviewing oligarchs for a recent book, says the elite are working to legitimise their monied status.

They are, she says, moulding into a class akin to the Soviet intelligentsia or Tsarist aristocracy, using cultural patronage to disguise the often-murky origins of their wealth.

A happy break-up — for some
The Russian ultra-rich amassed their wealth during the economic and social turmoil following the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the introduction of the market economy.

Many had ventured into commerce in the 1980s, unaware they were positioning themselves to benefit unimaginably from one of the fastest redistribution of assets in history.

Russia's early post-Soviet elite were from modest social backgrounds who had genuinely benefited from the Soviet education system.
Mr Abramovich, for example, grew up in poverty.

Over the course of the 1990s, a group of bankers and tycoons appeared at the top of the new rich stratum by seamlessly turning their political clout into wealth.

"The early Russian oligarchs seemed to have appeared from nowhere and got their hands on the driving wheel of government," Dr Schimpfossl says.

During the oil price boom that helped fuel President Vladimir Putin's resurgence in the 2000s, Moscow regularly topped rankings of cities with the most billionaires.

"A whole new layer joined them getting rich on the back of the high oil price which lasted until 2008," Dr Schimpfossl says.

"It was almost as important as the first round of privatisation in the '90s."

Mr Putin eventually brought economic liberalisation under his personal control and significantly reined in the oligarchs.

"If they didn't fall out with Vladimir Putin shortly after he came to power, they now prop up his kleptocracy with injections of cash whenever he asks them to," Dr Schimpfossl says.

And while living abroad is popular for many, Russia's oligarchs are being forced to keep a foothold at home regardless of their position in the state apparatus.
A 2013 law forced government officials, their spouses, and children under 18 to divest themselves of foreign stocks and bank accounts.

From yachts to paintings
Inequality in Russia is at staggering levels.
In 2013, the country had one billionaire for every $11 billion of household wealth, a ratio more than 15 times less equitable than the global average.
https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/latenightlive/podcasts-and-feeds/2892176
In a society that is still acclimatising to the idea of private property, these levels pose some challenges for the oligarchs, who are trying to legitimise their extraordinary wealth.

"The oligarchs are usually hated, and the re-shift of wealth in the population is resented by a population who trace their power directly to corruption during the '90s," Dr Schimpfossl says.

"When this first post-Soviet generation passes its wealth on, it will be the single biggest transfer of assets within the smallest group of people ever to have occurred."

Russian oligarchs have now set out to develop more cultured tastes, rediscover their family histories, and actively engage in philanthropy in order to justify their position in society.

According to Dr Schimpfossl, wealthy Russians are seeking to situate themselves in the tradition of the Soviet, and even Tsarist, intelligentsia.

"They may imagine themselves to be living like the Tsarist aristocrats in a Tolstoy novel, and they're brilliant at constructing narratives of their past," she says.
"This allows them to say they are not random people that made it to the top, but they actually have an obligation to be there, even a moral duty."

Key to this is their involvement in culture and philanthropy, reinvigorating the Soviet concept of 'kulturnost' which prescribed that social elites were versed in Russian music and literature.

Igor Tsukanov, for example, is a successful banker who frequently lends pieces of his world-class post-war Russian art collection to museum exhibitions.

The Tsukanov Family Foundation, run with his well-connected wife Natasha Tsukanov, is a London-based charity supporting education, arts and culture in Russia and the UK.

"My art is not for myself. My dream is to have a museum, for the best Russian collection outside Russia," he told the Financial Times in 2016.

It is hard to judge whether the ultra-rich of today's Russia will be able to find the social legitimacy Dr Schimpfossl believes they are seeking.
But as the country plans for a new wave of privatisations, they can probably count on getting richer.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-01-02/rich-russians-the-rise-of-the-oligarchs/10626236
 

Vcore89

G.O.A.T.
Just have the right connections when things are privatized and become an oligarch.

The rise of Russia's oligarchs — and their bid for legitimacy
ABC Radio National
By Joey Watson for Late Night Live
Updated 1 Jan 2019, 2:59pm

Roman Abramovich is the owner of the Eclipse, which, at 162.5 metres in length, is the world's second largest privately-owned yacht.

The $500 million boat sits alongside a list of possessions that include a multi-million-dollar art collection, a Boeing 767 plane, and the English Premier League football club Chelsea.

Mr Abramovich, like most Russian oligarchs, found his billions in the carve-up of the Soviet Union's industrial assets in the early '90s, through his connections to the Kremlin.

The oligarchs, sitting atop the most unequal economy in the developed world, can seem almost comical to observers in the West.

But beyond their glitzy extravagance, a complex social transformation is taking place, according to sociologist Elisabeth Schimpfossl.

Dr Schimpfossl, who travelled Russia interviewing oligarchs for a recent book, says the elite are working to legitimise their monied status.

They are, she says, moulding into a class akin to the Soviet intelligentsia or Tsarist aristocracy, using cultural patronage to disguise the often-murky origins of their wealth.

A happy break-up — for some
The Russian ultra-rich amassed their wealth during the economic and social turmoil following the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the introduction of the market economy.

Many had ventured into commerce in the 1980s, unaware they were positioning themselves to benefit unimaginably from one of the fastest redistribution of assets in history.

Russia's early post-Soviet elite were from modest social backgrounds who had genuinely benefited from the Soviet education system.
Mr Abramovich, for example, grew up in poverty.

Over the course of the 1990s, a group of bankers and tycoons appeared at the top of the new rich stratum by seamlessly turning their political clout into wealth.

"The early Russian oligarchs seemed to have appeared from nowhere and got their hands on the driving wheel of government," Dr Schimpfossl says.

During the oil price boom that helped fuel President Vladimir Putin's resurgence in the 2000s, Moscow regularly topped rankings of cities with the most billionaires.

"A whole new layer joined them getting rich on the back of the high oil price which lasted until 2008," Dr Schimpfossl says.

"It was almost as important as the first round of privatisation in the '90s."

Mr Putin eventually brought economic liberalisation under his personal control and significantly reined in the oligarchs.

"If they didn't fall out with Vladimir Putin shortly after he came to power, they now prop up his kleptocracy with injections of cash whenever he asks them to," Dr Schimpfossl says.

And while living abroad is popular for many, Russia's oligarchs are being forced to keep a foothold at home regardless of their position in the state apparatus.
A 2013 law forced government officials, their spouses, and children under 18 to divest themselves of foreign stocks and bank accounts.

From yachts to paintings
Inequality in Russia is at staggering levels.
In 2013, the country had one billionaire for every $11 billion of household wealth, a ratio more than 15 times less equitable than the global average.
https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/latenightlive/podcasts-and-feeds/2892176
In a society that is still acclimatising to the idea of private property, these levels pose some challenges for the oligarchs, who are trying to legitimise their extraordinary wealth.

"The oligarchs are usually hated, and the re-shift of wealth in the population is resented by a population who trace their power directly to corruption during the '90s," Dr Schimpfossl says.

"When this first post-Soviet generation passes its wealth on, it will be the single biggest transfer of assets within the smallest group of people ever to have occurred."

Russian oligarchs have now set out to develop more cultured tastes, rediscover their family histories, and actively engage in philanthropy in order to justify their position in society.

According to Dr Schimpfossl, wealthy Russians are seeking to situate themselves in the tradition of the Soviet, and even Tsarist, intelligentsia.

"They may imagine themselves to be living like the Tsarist aristocrats in a Tolstoy novel, and they're brilliant at constructing narratives of their past," she says.
"This allows them to say they are not random people that made it to the top, but they actually have an obligation to be there, even a moral duty."

Key to this is their involvement in culture and philanthropy, reinvigorating the Soviet concept of 'kulturnost' which prescribed that social elites were versed in Russian music and literature.

Igor Tsukanov, for example, is a successful banker who frequently lends pieces of his world-class post-war Russian art collection to museum exhibitions.

The Tsukanov Family Foundation, run with his well-connected wife Natasha Tsukanov, is a London-based charity supporting education, arts and culture in Russia and the UK.

"My art is not for myself. My dream is to have a museum, for the best Russian collection outside Russia," he told the Financial Times in 2016.

It is hard to judge whether the ultra-rich of today's Russia will be able to find the social legitimacy Dr Schimpfossl believes they are seeking.
But as the country plans for a new wave of privatisations, they can probably count on getting richer.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-01-02/rich-russians-the-rise-of-the-oligarchs/10626236
That's how we've been conditioned from the get-go, to be an oligarch, aherm, the lump in my throat is wanting to spit out Leo Tolstoy's (War and Peace): I often think how life's good fortune is sometimes distributed (like sitting on an oil field underneath an ancestral property).

The quest is on, to be an oligarch, aherm, another lump builds up, and of that I'm sure Andrew Carnegie would disagree to the effect of: The man who dies rich, is disgraced.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
The Great Gatsby


“And as I sat there brooding on the old, unknown world, I thought of Gatsby’s wonder when he first picked out the green light at the end of Daisy’s dock. He had come a long way to this blue lawn, and his dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was already behind him, somewhere back in that vast obscurity beyond the city, where the dark fields of the republic rolled on under the night.

Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that's no matter—to-morrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther. . . . And one fine morning——

So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”
― F. Scott Fitzgerald,
The Great Gatsby

 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
East Egg and West Egg, the fictitious settings in The Great Gatsby, were loosely based on the North Shore communities of Little Neck and Great Neck. I was fortunate to live in nearby Port Washington for several years and became more familiar with the areas on my daily commute via train to and from Manhattan.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
East Egg and West Egg, the fictitious settings in The Great Gatsby, were loosely based on the North Shore communities of Little Neck and Great Neck. I was fortunate to live in nearby Port Washington for several years and became more familiar with the areas on my daily commute via train to and from Manhattan.
Easter eggs & longneck bottles of beer . . .




. . . in Manhattan Beach?
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Manhattan Beach is a residential neighborhood in the borough of Brooklyn on the Atlantic Ocean and borders on Brighton Beach. It was quite the upscale destination for wealthy New Yorkers to escape the sweltering summer heat of the borough of Manhattan without dealing with the masses of working people that chose nearby Coney Island for their escape. Today, it’s a thriving middle to upper class neighborhood with a sizable population of Russian Jewish immigrants making their homes there in the last 40 years.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Brighton Beach has been the setting for many stories, including Brighton Beach Memoirs, Moscow on the Hudson, and Little Odessa.

A little south on the Atlantic coast is Atlantic City, also fertile grounds for storytelling. Boardwalk Empire is a dark and somewhat depressing HBO series that I really enjoyed.

Atlantic City is a dark and somewhat depressing Louis Malle film not surprisingly set in Atlantic City.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
The King Of Marvin Gardens is a film that is set in Atlantic City and reunited Jack Nicholson with director Bob Rafelson, who collaborated in Five Easy Pieces. The cast also included Bruce Dern and Ellen Burstyn.
 

Vcore89

G.O.A.T.
Teenagers growing up will be more prepared for the future work environs in the gig economy, especially with the rungs in the career ladder taken away. Say bye-bye to an expense account or that golden parachute.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Teenagers growing up will be more prepared for the future work environs in the gig economy, especially with the rungs in the career ladder taken away. Say bye-bye to an expense account or that golden parachute.
The Magnificent Seven
[Intro]
The Magnificent Seven!

[Chorus]
Ring! Ring! It's 7:00 A.M.!
Move yourself to go again
Cold water in the face
Brings you back to this awful place
Knuckle merchants and you bankers, too
Must get up and learn those rules
Weather man and the crazy chief
One says "Sun" and one says "Sleet"
A.M., the F.M. the P.M. too
Churnin' out that boogaloo
Gets you up and a'gets you out
But how long can you keep it up?
Gimme Honda, Gimme Sony
So cheap and real phony

Hong Kong dollar, Indian cents
English pounds and Eskimo pence


[Post-Chorus]
You lot! What?
Don't stop, give it all you got

You lot! What?
Don't stop, yeah!
You lot! What?
Don't stop, give it all you got

You lot! What?
Don't stop, yeah!
[Verse 1]
Workin' for a rise, better my station
Take my baby to sophistication

She's seen the ads, she thinks it's nice
Better work hard, I seen the price

Never mind that, it's time for the bus
We got to work, and you're one of us
Clocks go slow in a place of work
Minutes drag and the hours jerk

[Bridge]
"When can I tell 'em wot I do?
In a second, maaan, a'right Chuck!"

[Pre-Chorus]
Wave bub-bub-bub-bye to the boss
It's our profit, it's his loss

But anyway the lunch bell ring
Take one hour and do your thang!

Cheeseboiger!

[Verse 3]
What do we have for entertainment?
Cops kickin' Gypsies on the pavement

Now the news, a'snap to attention
The lunar landing of the dentist convention
Italian mobster shoots a lobster
Seafood restaurant gets outta hand
A car in the fridge, a fridge in the car?
Like cowboys do, in TV land



[Pre-Chorus]
You lot! What?
Don't stop, give it all you got
You lot! What?
Don't stop, oh!
You lot! What?
Don't stop, give it all you got, yeah
You lot! What?
Don't stop

[Chorus]
So get back to work and sweat some more
The sun will sink and we'll get out the door
It's no good for man to work in cages
Hits the town, he drinks his wages

You're frettin', you're sweatin'
But did you notice you ain't gettin'?
You're frettin', you're sweatin'
But did you notice not gettin' anywhere?
Don't you ever stop a'long enough to start?
Take your car outta that gear
Don't you ever stop long enough to start?
Get your car outta that gear

Karl Marx and Fredrich Engels
Came to the checkout at the 7-11
Marx was skint, but he had sense
Engels lent him the necessary pence

[Post-Chorus]
What have we got? Yeah
A'what have we got? Yeah-o
What have we got? Magnificence (I say)
What have we got?

[Chorus]
Luther King and Mahatma Gandhi
Went to the park to check on the game
But they was murdered by the other team
Who went on to win 15-nil

You can't be true, you can't be false
You'll be given the same reward
Socrates and Milhous Nixon
Both went the same way, through the kitchen

Plato the Greek or Rin Tin Tin
Who's more famous to the billion millions?

News Flash
Vacuum Cleaner Sucks Up Budgie
Ooh hoo!
Bye bye

[Post-Chorus]
The Magnificent Seven!
Magnificent!

[Outro]
Magnificent Seven!

"This is fuckin' long, isn't it?"

 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Seven is considered a lucky number in Western culture but eight is the magic number in Chinese culture, hence the significance of the 29th Olympics opening on the eighth day of the eighth month of the year 2008. It didn’t hurt numerology experts that a young man from Basel celebrated his 27th birthday by carrying the Swiss flag during the opening ceremonies.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Seven is considered a lucky number in Western culture but eight is the magic number in Chinese culture, hence the significance of the 29th Olympics opening on the eighth day of the eighth month of the year 2008. It didn’t hurt numerology experts that a young man from Basel celebrated his 27th birthday by carrying the Swiss flag during the opening ceremonies.
Double Ten Day


The Double Ten Day is celebrated in Taiwan as a national holiday. However, it may be one of the most hard-to-understand days to explain to anyone not extremely well-versed in Chinese history (yes CHINESE history.) It is also the one day that may provoke the most rage and debate.

Double Ten is observed on October 10 every year, but what does it celebrate?

October 10 is…
Taiwan’s birthday? No.
Republic of China’s birthday? No.
Chinese Nationalist Party’s birthday? Yes.
HOWEVER, Double Ten Day is NOT a celebration of the Chinese Nationalist Party’s birthday. Instead it is the celebration of the start of the Wuchang Uprising which later led to the Xinhai Revolution.

Wuchang uprising marks the start of the end of the Chinese dynasties. Unhappy with the Manchu controlled Qing dynasty, revolutionaries in China were gathering to overthrow the Qing dynaster. Amongst these revolutionaries was Dr. Sun Yet-Sen, who helped found the Tongmenghui (同盟會.) Sun Yet-Sen spent much of his time overseas trying to get funding for the uprising. This was also because Sun was exiled from China since a previous Guangzhou uprising (1895.)
After many provinces ceded from the Qing Dynasty, Sun returned to China and was elected the first president of the Provisional Government of the Republic of China on Jan 1, 1912.
https://oftaiwan.org/culture/double-ten-day/

The end of the Qing Dynasty was finalized with the last emperor Puyi abdicating his throne on Feb 12, 1912.
https://oftaiwan.org/culture/double-ten-day/



10/1

WORLD NEWS
SEPTEMBER 24, 2019 / 6:11 PM / 3 MONTHS AGO
Explainer: China's celebrations to mark 70 years of the People's Republic

Ben Blanchard

BEIJING (Reuters) - Chinese President Xi Jinping will oversee a massive military parade through central Beijing on Oct. 1 to mark the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China.
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-anniversary-explainer/explainer-chinas-celebrations-to-mark-70-years-of-the-peoples-republic-idUSKBN1WA03J


 
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