Word of the day

Mugwump

One of a group of people that held themselves aloof from a political party in their desire for political reform-
working against corruption. From an Algonquian word meaning "Big Chief".
 
OK, then,

Venereal- Fron Venus the goddess of love, sexually transmitted disease.

Earthy- From the soil, of the earth, humus- basic and "down to earth", open and direct, uninhibited, coarse, bawdy, lewd.

Plutonian- Like the planet, from the God of the underworld, dark, infernal, of the underworld, demonic.

Martial- As in Mars, God of war, military, war-like, having to to with fighting- martial arts.
 
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Torero a general name for "bullfighter".

Toreador the older name for a bullfighter on horseback- now, more commonly called a rejoneador.

Banderillero another bullfighter on horseback who "stabs" the bull with little flags that have barbed ends.

Matador this is the main bullfighter who fights on foot and who kills the bull (Matar- to kill).

All the above is very simplified. There are many levels and specialists that each have their traditional names.
 

Vcore89

G.O.A.T.
greening

At Time Magazine, one of the editors' jobs was to trim overly long stories. Editors were given a green pencil to cross out what can be pruned with instructions on how many lines to green -- ''Green seven'' or ''Green eleven''. . . . so they called it greening.
 

Sudacafan

Bionic Poster
Plutonian- Like the planet, from the God of the underworld, dark, infernal, of the underworld, demonic.
Plutus is Often Confused/Conflated with Pluto

1. PLUTUS (mythology)
Plutus
(/ˈpluːtəs/; Greek: Πλοῦτος, translit. Ploûtos, lit. "wealth") is the Greek god of wealth. He was supposedly born on the Greek island of Crete. He is the son of Demeter and Iasion. He is often depicted as a boy carrying a horn-shaped container of wheat called a cornucopia.

Like many other figures in Greek mythology, Plutus' name is related to several English words. These include:
  • Plutocracy, rule by the wealthy, and plutocrat, one who rules by virtue of wealth
  • Plutonomics, the study of wealth management
  • Plutolatry, the "worship" of money
  • Plutomania, an excessive desire for wealth

2. PLUTO (mythology)
(Greek: Πλούτων, Ploutōn) was the ruler of the underworld in classical mythology. The earlier name for the god was Hades, which became more common as the name of the underworld itself. In ancient Greek religion and mythology, Pluto represents a more positive concept of the god who presides over the afterlife.


Plutus vs Pluto - Comparative analysis
While their names may sound similar, Plutus is very different from Pluto, who is the god of the underworld.
Ploutōn (latin, Pluto) was frequently conflated with Ploutos (latin, Plutus), the Greek god of wealth, because mineral wealth was found underground, and because as a chthonic god Pluto ruled the deep earth that contained the seeds necessary for a bountiful harvest. The name Ploutōn came into widespread usage with the Eleusinian Mysteries, in which Pluto was venerated as both a stern ruler and a loving husband to Persephone. The couple received souls in the afterlife and are invoked together in religious inscriptions, being referred to as Plouton and as Kore respectively. Hades, by contrast, had few temples and religious practices associated with him, and he is portrayed as the dark and violent abductor of Persephone.



3. And last, but not least, we have the sad case of Pluto which was born as a planet, then demoted and questioned as a planet, and finally classified as a dwarf planet:

PLUTO (planet
1930 - 1990, demoted planet 1990-2006, dwarf planet since 2006)
Pluto (minor-planet designation: 134340 Pluto) is a dwarf planet in the Kuiper belt, a ring of bodies beyond the orbit of Neptune. It was the first and the largest Kuiper belt object to be discovered. After Pluto was discovered in 1930, it was declared to be the ninth planet from the Sun. Beginning in the 1990s, its status as a planet was questioned following the discovery of several objects of similar size in the Kuiper belt and the scattered disc, including the dwarf planet Eris. This led the International Astronomical Union (IAU) in 2006 to formally define the term "planet"—excluding Pluto and reclassifying it as a dwarf planet.
 
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Torero a general name for "bullfighter".

Toreador the older name for a bullfighter on horseback- now, more commonly called a rejoneador.

Banderillero another bullfighter on horseback who "stabs" the bull with little flags that have barbed ends.

Matador this is the main bullfighter who fights on foot and who kills the bull (Matar- to kill).

All the above is very simplified. There are many levels and specialists that each have their traditional names.
Just to correct that the banderilleros don't ride in horseback, but are on foot.

Many people are opposed to bullfighting in Spain based on the fact it is cruel to the bull (which is an undeniable fact). But the fact is that a bull that dies in the ring has one of the best lives a bovine can have up to that point. It gets to roam in vast states with the best grass, mates with multiple cows at will, and it is pampered. Then the time comes to die in the ring (though bulls that show exceptional bravery are pardoned sometimes).

Putting things in perspective, I would sign up to be a bullfighting bull right now as opposed to a regular farmed bull that spends all its live in dismal conditions and ends in an undignified manner with a bolt through the head anyway.

Also, bullfighting is an extremely dangerous occupation and requires great bravery. You have no idea of the magnitude and power of a bullfighting bull, its fierceness, until you are at ground level. Many bullfighters are killed.

A few years ago a radio host in Northern California played a video of a bullfighter getting gored to death, congratulating himself of the outcome loudly and insulting the bullfighter as he was getting killed, and I became so disgusted that I never listened to him again.
 
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Just to correct that the banderilleros don't ride in horseback, but are on foot.

Many people are opposed to bullfighting in Spain based on the fact it is cruel to the bull (which is an undeniable fact). But the fact is that a bull that dies in the ring has one of the best lives a bovine can have up to that point. It gets to roam in vast states with the best grass, mates with multiple cows at will, and it is pampered. Then the time comes to die in the ring (though bulls that show exceptional bravery are pardoned sometimes).

Putting things in perspective, I would sign up to be a bullfighting bull right now as opposed to a regular farmed bull that spends all its live in dismal conditions and ends in an undignified manner with a bolt through the head anyway.

Also, bullfighting is an extremely dangerous occupation and requires great bravery. You have no idea of the magnitude and power of a bullfighting bull, its fierceness, until you are at ground level. Many bullfighters are killed.

A few years ago a radio host in Northern California played a video of a bullfighter getting gored to death, congratlating himself of the outcome loudly, and I became so disgusted that I never listened to him again.
You are correct, and that is what I thought from seeing bullfights in the movies. When I came across that (on horseback) definition on some bullfighting site, I figured I must be wrong. But now that I have checked again, I cannot even find that site. Anyway, it is the picador that is on horseback with a lance-like stick to poke at and tease the bull. Thanks.
 
You are correct, and that is what I thought from seeing bullfights in the movies. When I came across that (on horseback) definition on some bullfighting site, I figured I must be wrong. But now that I have checked again, I cannot even find that site. Anyway, it is the picador that is on horseback with a lance-like stick to poke at and tease the bull. Thanks.
Exactly, but bullfighting has evolved through the years and varies between countries. It is possible that some form of banderillero might ride horse, but highly doubtful due to the mechanics of the procedure (banderilleros approach the bull running, which I can't see done on horseback for multiple reasons).

Also notice that, while cruel, the effect of the banderillas and the pica is needed. The only way to make it possible to eventually kill the bull is to weaken it through loss of blood so that the matador can stand a good chance of being successful. Many matadors still die. So there is no gratuitous cruelty involved. Of course, you could argue about the need of the whole ritual, and I understand why some people object to it.
 
Parvenu

Nowadays we don't tend to look down on people who have gained sudden wealth, fame or influence, but not so long ago
there were words to describe these people to remind them of their "place". They might have been called social climbers, nouveau riche, upstarts or parvenus.
 
Lambent

Lam"bent (?), a. [L. lambens, -enlis, p. pr. of lambere to lick; akin to lap. See Lap to drink by licking.] 1. Playing on the surface; touching lightly; gliding over. "A lambent flame." Dryden. "A lambent style." Beaconsfield.

2. Twinkling or gleaming; fickering. "The lambent purity of the stars." W. Irving.
 
Gallium

is a metalic element (atomic # 31) that has a very low melting point (about 86 degrees f). It is mostly used in electronics for semiconductors, transistors and LEDs.
Because of its low melting point, it will actually melt in your hand.
Also, galliun is used in the famous melting spoon gag.

 

Sudacafan

Bionic Poster
Lambast / Lambaste
transitive verb
1: to assault violently : BEAT, WHIP
2: to attack verbally : CENSURE . critics lambasted his performance

For the verb meaning (1) to beat or (2) to scold or berate, lambaste is the preferred spelling in American and Canadian English, while lambast is preferred in varieties of English from outside North America.
While the exact derivation of the word is not definitively known, the OED posits that it’s a combination of lam and baste, both of which bear the sense (now archaic for both words) to beat soundly. Other sources agree. And lambaste is the older form. In historical Google Books searches, lambast is almost nonexistent before 1850. It appears increasingly in the second half of that century, including in works by Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling (British authors).

Examples
That’s the way of these sharks; they first hand-cuff a man’s ideas with hard words, then lambaste him for not following suit; and afterwards make him pay the piper. [A [Green Hand’s First Cruise, by Josiah Cobb (1841)]
“For,” he said, “if you lambast the critters, it is a fact, they’ll drown theirselves just to spite you.” [All the Year Round, by Charles Dickens (1866)]
“And if they don’t cry—I repeat, if they don’t cry, I’ll lambaste the stuffing out of them.” [Smoke Bellow, by Jack London (1912)]
Browns Lambast Yanks 10-2 in Series Opener [Bonham Daily Favorite (1943)]
Dear Abby: I didn’t appreciate that letter from Elaine lambasting people who send annual newsletters to their friends at Christmas time. [Evening Independent (1969)]
Tagg Romney, Mitt Romney’s eldest son, took to Twitter on Monday to lambast the “liberal media” for “mocking my dead grandpa”. [Telegraph (2012)]
Since then, the two leaders have maintained a personally amicable relationship but have continued to lambaste each other’s policies. [Wall Street Journal (2012)]
 
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Sparkling water is the term most often used to describe naturally carbonated water from a spring.

Club soda is basically ordinary water artificially carbonized and with minerals added to enhance the taste.

Tonic water is similar to club soda in make-up, but with quinine and sweetener added.

Seltzer is basically just artificially carbonated water- especially when served up in a seltzer bottle- like in a Three
Stooges movie.
 
Similar meanings

Flagitious Fom the Latin meaning "shameful thing", flagitious refers to a person or action that is wicked, corrupt, criminal, villainous. "His flagitious disregard of safety protocol".

Egregious Something that stands out or is extraordinary, but in a bad or negative way- an egregious insult or crime.
Something shockingly bad.
 
Neoplasm

A neoplasm is an abnormal growth of tissue, often due to mutation, that may or may not be cancerous.
A tumor is one form of neoplasm.

Pleonasm

Pleonasm is when you use more words than necessary to convey meaning- "he saw it with his own eyes", instead if "he saw it".

Mostly this is poor writing, but sometimes can be used for effect or emphasis.
 

Sudacafan

Bionic Poster
Similar meanings

Flagitious Fom the Latin meaning "shameful thing", flagitious refers to a person or action that is wicked, corrupt, criminal, villainous. "His flagitious disregard of safety protocol".

Egregious Something that stands out or is extraordinary, but in a bad or negative way- an egregious insult or crime.
Something shockingly bad.
This is outrageous, appalling and abhorrent…

Oh, sorry, wrong thread.
 
Some worldly words that mean a tip or gratuity.

Lagniappe refers to something (usually inexpensive) given as an "extra"- like getting a small toy with your fast food purchase or when the bakery throws in a couple doughnut "holes" with your purchase.

Pourboire is basically a tip for some service.

Perquisite is a "perk" or privilege due to one's position, like having your own parking space- or it could just be a tip.

Douceur comes from a root meaning to sweeten, as in sweeten the deal- a gratuity, bribe or tip.

Cumshaw comes from a southern Chinese dialect meaning "grateful thanks". Foreigners mistook the word thinking they were being asked for a handout. It came to mean a tip, gift or bonus.

Baksheeh is used in parts of Asia and Northern Africa to mean a small tip, charitable donation, or plain old bribe.
 
Kleptocracy from the Greek- a government of thieves.
Refers to endemic political corruption, where those in power use their position to embezzle/steal public funds.
 
Specious - superficially plausible, but actually wrong or misleading- a specious argument.

Contrived - deliberately created rather than natural and genuine- like those TV "reality" shows that are supposed to be real and unscripted, but are really not.

Mock - an imitation of a real thing, something faked or arranged for practice- mock-turtle soup or a mock battle. Can also mean to tease a person by imitation.

Spurious - fake, false- a spurious claim.

Pseudo - usually used in combination form to mean fake, as in pseudoscience, used alone it can mean an insincere person or phony.

Phony - a person or thing that is not "real", pretend, putting on airs.

Ersatz - usually an inferior product substituted for the real thing.

Quasi - means sort of or half- as in a half-truth. He lives in his own quasi-reality due to his agoraphobia.

Crypto - used alone it could refer to a member of a secret society, in combination it means hidden or secret as in- he is a crypto- racist.

Counterfeit - a copy, forgery, imitation, reproduction intending to deceive.

Faux - artificial or unreal as in- faux flowers, faux concern, a faux person.

Fraudulent - obtained or done through deception, double dealing, crooked deceitful.

More?
 
A few more

Bogus

Unauthentic

Feigned - pretended, insincere- often used in relation to some emotion- she feigned caring for his work in the slaughterhouse- or the way an opossum feigns death to avoid attack.
 

happyandbob

Hall of Fame
Specious - superficially plausible, but actually wrong or misleading- a specious argument.

Contrived - deliberately created rather than natural and genuine- like those TV "reality" shows that are supposed to be real and unscripted, but are really not.

Mock - an imitation of a real thing, something faked or arranged for practice- mock-turtle soup or a mock battle. Can also mean to tease a person by imitation.

Spurious - fake, false- a spurious claim.

Pseudo - usually used in combination form to mean fake, as in pseudoscience, used alone it can mean an insincere person or phony.

Phony - a person or thing that is not "real", pretend, putting on airs.

Ersatz - usually an inferior product substituted for the real thing.

Quasi - means sort of or half- as in a half-truth. He lives in his own quasi-reality due to his agoraphobia.

Crypto - used alone it could refer to a member of a secret society, in combination it means hidden or secret as in- he is a crypto- racist.

Counterfeit - a copy, forgery, imitation, reproduction intending to deceive.

Faux - artificial or unreal as in- faux flowers, faux concern, a faux person.

Fraudulent - obtained or done through deception, double dealing, crooked deceitful.

More?
excessive

1. exceeding what is usual, proper, necessary, or normal

;) :-D
 
Lee

Means on the side opposite to the wind.
We camped in the lee of a huge rock.

Leeward- toward the lee side. Opposite would be windward.
 
Lark

Other than a type of bird, lark, larking, on a lark, means a bit of frolicking- usually on a whim,
Something done in a carefree manner in the spur of a moment.
 
Pig stuff.

Idioms and sayings usually grwow out of what is common and familiar.
*When monkeys as pets were a fad, for example, people used to keep
them by the barrel, hence the term "more fun than a barrel of monkeys".

In an agrarian society, pigs were even more common.
Here are some idiomatic phrases involving swine.

In a pig's eye

Don't buy a pig in a poke

Throw pearls before swine

Hog out or pig out

Put lipstick on a pig

Go hog wild

Live high on the hog

Pork barrel politics

Pork pie hat

Bring home the bacon

Ham actor

Make a silk purse from a sow's ear

More?

*not really
 
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