Word of the day

Quotidian
Refers to everyday aspects of life, little things we do on a daily basis- like driving th work, brushing teeth, making dinner.
It can also be a daily newspaper (do they still have those?).
 
Potboiler
A word to describe, usually books, but also painting, music, movies that are designed to appeal to the popular taste- with their main purpose of making money rather than advancing art or knowledge.
 
Words meaning clumps or groups of trees and or brush-

Thicket- dense group of brush and trees
Boskage- a mass of trees and or shrubs
Brake- area thickly overgrown with one kind of plant
Grove- group of trees, close together without undergrowth
Orchard- area planted with fruit trees- note: apple orchard, orange grove.
Copse- a small thicket of trees
Spinney- a small area of trees and brush

Words meaning opens areas of land-

Lea- open, grassy land
Meadow- low-lying land covered with grass and wildflowers
Moor- open uncultivated land
Glen- secluded narrow valley
Dale- a depression between hills
Combe- a short valley on a hillside or coastline
Valley- low land between mountains or hills with a drainage system
Hollow- elongated lowland between hills, mountains with a river or creek
Dingle- small, wooded, narrow, valley
Heath- open, uncultivated land covered with heather, gorse, coarse grasses
Fen- low marshy area
 
Cusp

A cusp is a point, peak or tip- think about your pointy tooth (the canine) it is a cuspid, with one point - the
bicuspid has two peaks.

Because a cusp is a peak, it can be thought of as a transitional point or boundary line- like a mountain separating 2 areas- so it can mean the moment before a change, the verge or boundary between two situations, conditions or categories.
On the cusp of a major discovery.

It can mean the boundary between 2 zodiac signs.

The point(s) of a crescent moon- sometimes called horns.

Some heart valves are called cusps.
 
Mnemonic
Derived from a Greek word meaning "relating to memory" and related to the Greek god Mnemosyne (goddess of memory)- mnemonics are familiar to us as techniques to aid memory- such as the name Roy G. Biv to help remember the colors of thr rainbow.
 
Bits and Pieces

Disintegrate - to break up into small pieces from impact or decay, but it can also mean the disintegration of a culture or a marriage, or that sort of thing.

Pulverize - to reduce to a fine powder, dust, particles- like the way bricks are pulverized to make clay tennis courts.

Smitereenes - small fragments, tiny pieces. I found the Korean vase on the floor, in smithereens. I suspect the cat.
 
Grist for the mill

Grist is grain dumped onto a mill-wheel for grinding into flour.
By extension, anything that is basically material for serving or feeding a particular purpose can
be considered "grist". When it comes to TV news, scandalous behavior, among the famious, is grist for the mill.
 

stringertom

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Grist for the mill

Grist is grain dumped onto a mill-wheel for grinding into flour.
By extension, anything that is basically material for serving or feeding a particular purpose can
be considered "grist". When it comes to TV news, scandalous behavior, among the famious, is grist for the mill.
Separating the wheat from the chaff is another adage related to milling. It means separating the worthy grain from the waste byproduct of the process.
 
Circadian
Means having to do with the way a biological entity (like a human) evolves in tune to earthly rhythms such as the 24 hour day and night cycle (and possibly a lunar cycle as well). Sometimes referred to as an internal clock or environmental cycles.
 
Mise en scene

A term, originally from theater (stage) and since expanded to movies and even restaurant design.

Basically, it means everything that you see and the way you see it- in a movie scene/shot it
can include choice of actors, costumes, angle of shot, type of lens, background, lighting, makeup, arrangement of actors, overall composition- basically anything and everything the audience will see.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Mise en scene

A term, originally from theater (stage) and since expanded to movies and even restaurant design.

Basically, it means everything that you see and the way you see it- in a movie scene/shot it
can include choice of actors, costumes, angle of shot, type of lens, background, lighting, makeup, arrangement of actors, overall composition- basically anything and everything the audience will see.
The MacGuffin.

Most often thought of in relation to the Hitchcock oeuvre, this cinematic concept of an inanimate object being the symbol of the force that catalyzes action and the plot line to develop. Examples include Tarantino using the shiny briefcase in Pulp Fiction, the DudeAu’s rug in The Big Lebowski, the Infinity stones in Marvel’s Avenger franchise, The Holy Grail in so many movies from Python comedy to Spielberg’s Indy Jones, Rosebud in Citizen Kane and more.
 
Plenipotentiary

A person endowed, granted, assigned, invested with absolute authority, power, to act on behalf of another-
usually in a diplomatic capacity as an agent, envoy or ambassador of a government.

However, by extension, anyone with similar authority might be referred to as a plenipotentiary.
 
Happen to be reading a book published in 1955 and in one chapter the author talks about the proletariat
and the bourgeoisie. Seems like these terms are not used very often, lately.

Bourgeoisie - Traditionally this word refers to capitalists who own or control the means of production and, generally, control the wealth of nations and command power and influence.
In a different sense, it can mean a comfortable middle class with materialistic values and conventional attitudes.

Proletariat - From a Marxist point of view, the proletariat is the worker, the working class wage earners who sell their labor to the bourgeoisie.
 
Thrice the brinded cat hath mew'd

Some "splotchy" words

Brindled (or brinded) - having a brownish or grayish color and streaked or striped with another color.

Stippled - dotted, specked, flecked, freckled.

Dappled - having spots, rounded patches of color, a dappled faun, dappled sunlight beneath the trees.

Motley - patched together with a mix of different colors- like the particolored costume of an old court jester. By extension, any mix or incongruous assortment of items or people a motley crew of soldiers- like the Dirty Dozen.

Particolored - a mix of colors. With dogs, for example, you have things like the parti-poodle.

Argyle - from Scotland, a diamond pattern (usually knit) of various colors over a plain background- often
associated with golf.

Pied - similar to particolored- composed of two or more colors- like the clothes of the pied-piper.

Oh, and here is a poem by Gerard Manley Hopkins
in praise of dappled things-


Pied Beauty
Gerard Manley Hopkins - 1844-1889

Glory be to God for dappled things—
For skies of couple-colour as a brinded cow;
For rose-moles all in stipple upon trout that swim;
Fresh-firecoal chestnut-falls; finches' wings;
Landscape plotted and pieced—fold, fallow, and plough;
And all trades, their gear and tackle and trim.

All things counter, original, spare, strange;
Whatever is fickle, freckled (who knows how?)
With swift, slow; sweet, sour; adazzle, dim;
He fathers-forth whose beauty is past change:
Praise Him.
 
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Coalesce to unite, grow together, fuse into a single unit, consolidate- like a wound, nearby townships, factions uniting for a cause.

Converge come together at a particular point- like lines of longitude converging at the poles, or reporters converging at the site of an accident.

Capacious roomy, able to hold or contain a lot, like a handbag or a mind.

Commodious similar to capacious, comfortably roomy, ample, extensive, generous.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Coalesce to unite, grow together, fuse into a single unit, consolidate- like a wound, nearby townships, factions uniting for a cause.

Converge come together at a particular point- like lines of longitude converging at the poles, or reporters converging at the site of an accident.

Capacious roomy, able to hold or contain a lot, like a handbag or a mind.

Commodious similar to capacious, comfortably roomy, ample, extensive, generous.
Eye sea watt ewe did their.

Two continue ewer sea change, there is/was a great poster named @magdalenapratt who did some amazingly creative caricatures of Our Lard of San Diego.

Caricature is a graphic depiction of a person, utilizing exaggeration of features to achieve a humorous or sometimes grotesque treatment. The word origin is French from Italian and then from all the way back to Latin and carricare, a verb meaning “to load.”
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
Bourgeoisie - Traditionally this word refers to capitalists who own or control the means of production and, generally, control the wealth of nations and command power and influence.
In a different sense, it can mean a comfortable middle class with materialistic values and conventional attitudes.
Those two different meanings used to confuse me a lot. In some situations in articles or movies, bourgeoisie would be used to contemptuously refer to very rich and aristocratic people, and in others to uppity middle class people who did not sympathize with the proletariat.
 
Cheeses named after places

Brie - once called the King of Cheesed by the Congress of Vienna (1815)- from Brie in northeastern France.

Colby - a granular cheese first made in Colby, Wisconsin in late 1800s.

Parmeasan - hard, aged cheese named after Parma- where it is called parmigiano.

Stilton - named after an English village, but it may never, actually, have been made there. Mentioned by
Danial Defoe in 1722.

Limburger - created by Trappist monks in Belgian town of Same name.

Cheddar - gets its name from the village of Cheddar in Sommerset, England- from the 16th century.

Gouda - a sphere-shaped cheese from Dutch town of Gouda.

Swiss - called emmenthaler in Switzerland, derives its holes from a natural pocketing of carbon dioxide gas due to ageing.

Monterey Jack - created in Monterey, California in the 1890s by a guy named David Jacks.

Tillamook - an American Cheddar made in Tillamook County, Oregon
 

stringertom

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Cheeses named after places

Brie - once called the King of Cheesed by the Congress of Vienna (1815)- from Brie in northeastern France.

Colby - a granular cheese first made in Colby, Wisconsin in late 1800s.

Parmeasan - hard, aged cheese named after Parma- where it is called parmigiano.

Stilton - named after an English village, but it may never, actually, have been made there. Mentioned by
Danial Defoe in 1722.

Limburger - created by Trappist monks in Belgian town of Same name.

Cheddar - gets its name from the village of Cheddar in Sommerset, England- from the 16th century.

Gouda - a sphere-shaped cheese from Dutch town of Gouda.

Swiss - called emmenthaler in Switzerland, derives its holes from a natural pocketing of carbon dioxide gas due to ageing.

Monterey Jack - created in Monterey, California in the 1890s by a guy named David Jacks.

Tillamook - an American Cheddar made in Tillamook County, Oregon
Tillamook makes a lot more than cheddar…ice cream, Swiss cheese, sour cream, cream cheese, butter, yogurt.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Brie’s close cousin Camembert feels slighted. Great on une baguette avec vin rouge and from the sleepy Normandy village where the cheee was invented at the time of The French Revolution.
 
Accidentally left out the Camembert. It is also named after- you guessed it- Camembert. Though Brie had been around since the 8th centurary, the story goes that in the18th centurary, a farmer began making this similar cheese following advice from a priest from Brie. Brie tends to be lighter and creamier, while Camembert is a bit earthier, denser, more rustic, and fancied by Salvador Dalli. If my information is correct (correct me if I am wrong) neither cheese can be bought, in their original form, in the United States because they were made from raw (not pasteurized) milk. Variations made with pasteurized milk are available.
 
Vitriolic - derived from an old term for sulfates that create sulfuric acid.
When used relating to language, the term means harsh, caustic, hateful, cruel denunciations that we might expect from
partisan politicians, and now, it seems, local PTA moms.
 
Ectoplasm - at one time, think Houdini and Arthur Conan Doyle, spiritualism was a popular "fad". The mediums who led seances developed a terminology for describing other-worldly experience.
Ectoplasm was (is?) the term for that spiritual manifestation into the physical world- which we now tend to think of as Ghostbuster slime.
 
Malingerer - refers to a person who pretends to be sick, or exaggerates illness to avoid duty, work, school, gain sympathy, collect workers compensation, or obtain prescription drugs.
 

Vcore89

G.O.A.T.
The revolutionary genome-editing technology CRISPR.
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happyandbob

Hall of Fame
Malingerer - refers to a person who pretends to be sick, or exaggerates illness to avoid duty, work, school, gain sympathy, collect workers compensation, or obtain prescription drugs.
Cool. I didn't know that had such a specific definition. I always thought it was more general and just referred to someone lazy who sat around and didn't like to work
 
Abbey - a building or set of buildings occupied by monks or nuns and governed by an abbot or abbess.
Sometimes the buildings are turned to other uses but continue to use the term abbey, probably because it sounds historical.

Abbess - a female in charge of the running of an abbey- often a Mother Superior.

Abyss - n- a deep, seemingly bottomless chasm or pit. By extension, it can refer to a deep divide or gulf between people-
for example an ever increasing abyss between the ultra rich and the struggling poor.

Abysmal - adj.- like an abyss, deeply, profoundly, extremely- usually in a negative sense- his grades, this semester are abysmal, he would have to do much better to simply fail.
 
Fabulous - early on was used to mean having the nature of a fable- something full of wonder, mythical- it was a fabulous story of enchanted lands.
Eventually, it came to mean incredible, enormous, amazing- she lived in a fabulous palace with doors of carved malachite. Most recently it means really good, terrific, great, marvelous, fantastic. He woke up feeling fabulous after a good sleep.

Fantastic - like fabulous, was used in a more literal sense to mean derived from fantasy or the imagination- involving the odd, bizarre or fanciful. More recently, like fabulous, it has come to mean great, good, attractive, striking, impressive- he woke up feeling fantastic after a good sleep.
 
Lorgnette

Lorgnettes are those kinds of glasses the You sometimes see in period movies. Rather than fitting over the ears, they are held in front of the eyes by a long (usually folding) handle. They can have normal lenses or be telescopic opera glasses.
This type of glasses was more of a fashion statement than practical eyewear.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
The definition of a moonbeam is contradictory to reality. According to Merriam-Webster, a moonbeam is a ray of light from the moon. The moon is not a star and many are the nights when there are no beams from the moon. What a “ray of light from the moon” is the result of our lone natural satellite being at a proper position to reflect rays of sunlight from its surface towards viewers on Planet Earth.

It doesn’t quite flow off the tongue as well but Van Morrison should have written and sung:

You know the soft sunlight reflected off the moon seems to shine in your blush.

Doesn’t roll off the tongue like:

You know the soft moonlight seems to shine in your blush
 
Maudlin

Maudlin refers to when a person falls into a self-pitying, weepy, sentimental, schmaltzy, mawkish, mushy mood- often after having indulged in too much alcoholic beverage. We try to avoid Lemuel when he falls into a maudlin mood- to avoid having to listen to his sad stories about Lucy, his first love.
 
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