Work up the ladder to become professional stringer.

No worries, I would be just as excited! I'll answer your questions as best as possible.
This was a mixture of proving myself on social media as well as having some good connections to be introduced to the right people; sprinkle in a little pestering and boom got the invite.
Personally, I have the MRT certification but I don't think all the stringers have one. I believe being a good stringer is the most important thing. You have can all the certs in the industry and still be a crap stringer. Proof is in the pudding, ya know? I know that the URSRA has recently added the Pro Tour Stringer element to their tests (ERSA has this already). Though I think that is more speed and tone more than anything else. Don't quote me on that part as I have not researched it enough, perhaps @SavvyStringer can comment.
There's really nothing to prepare you for a tryout like this. Yes, you know that you'll be stringing a lot of racquets but the pressure and timing of everything is something that you can't really prepare for. It's intense and can break you emotionally (there were moments where I felt like I was just going to break down in tears and I'm pretty emotionally level-headed).
I believe I will be changing my practices, it's a simpler method that if done right, I can shave off a minute to a minute and a half off of my stringing time (currently 18 min average for 18x20), just have to practice more. I have already strung several racquets since I got back with the method taught, so I may keep at it for a while and see how I like it after a few months.
Many protour stringers are not certified because as @cluckcluck said, it really doesn't matter at that level. The certification is just a piece of paper. As for the ProTour, from my understanding it is stringing 3-4 rackets within a given time frame and having the DTs all within 1. I would think there would be more to it, but I don't know for sure. I've been told there are only like 5 testers for that cert at current and none near me. I haven't done the Wilson training but I spend a lot of time communicating with a friend that is on the Wilson team so I don't know any true specifics other than there is a Wilson way and it's something you would never pick up on, on your own. They basically reteach you to string within their format. I haven't had the opportunity to go through it yet but there's always time.
 

Dags

Hall of Fame
I'll answer your questions as best as possible.
And excellent answers they were too. Thanks!
Many protour stringers are not certified because as @cluckcluckI don't know any true specifics other than there is a Wilson way and it's something you would never pick up on, on your own.
This sort of thing both surprises and intrigued me. You’d think, how many ways can there be to string a racquet? And if there are better ways, why wouldn’t those have made it into the public domain? I guess the only way to find out would be to get myself onto a stringing team. Or perhaps I’ll just accept that ignorance is bliss...
 
Savvy is totally correct as different team has different rules. Makes perfect sense because just like UPS and Fedex they are both carriers however I am sure they have different ways they do things. Word of mouth and obviously an invitation for try out would be in order for the major teams and they will surely run a crash course on their expectations.
I do wonder are tryout accommodations included like travel, lodging, etc... I'm assuming not, so to actually go through the process for TRYOUT is purely for those who want the experiences and have true passion. It is really commendable to invest in their dreams.
 
Thanks for the insight. Makes me consider whether to apply for it, although not desperate to go for it. Have plenty on my plate.

Interesting to hear they go 1 piece unless players says other wise. Is that a question that's asked of the player, or the player has to state 2 piece?

Given the numbers of hybrids, most other stringing teams default to 2 piece; and only do 1 piece if requested. I can name about 6 players who want 1 piece, so a majority want 2 piece; it would therefore be more sensible to follow the majority. 2 piece is the default option at Indian Wells Head Stringing Team

As for Wimbledon team, every member of the team that works during the main draw of the tournament are at least at ESRA Pro Tour Stringer Lvl 1, many are Pro Tour Stringer Lvl 2. Looking at the requirements for the USRSA Tournament stringer criteria, the ERSA is a lot more stringent (http://www.ersa-stringers.co.uk/pts-1--2-requirements.html)
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
It does not surprise me the Head stringing team defaults to 2 piece. Also I have no idea why some stringing teams are so secretive about how stringing is done. You can go on YouTube and find out how the mains are started and how they string 1 piece. There is a lot more to it than that but I can’t see the secret nature of it all.
 
Here are the USRSA Tournament Stringer specifications:
"MRT — Tournament Stringer Specialist: Only available to Current USRSA MRTs. Applicant will pass a practical exam to string two pairs of racquets under tournament stringing conditions following the instructions given and specification tickets provided with each pair of racquets. Work must be completed within the time allotted and to the correct specifications without error."
 
Thanks for the insight. Makes me consider whether to apply for it, although not desperate to go for it. Have plenty on my plate.

Interesting to hear they go 1 piece unless players says other wise. Is that a question that's asked of the player, or the player has to state 2 piece?

Given the numbers of hybrids, most other stringing teams default to 2 piece; and only do 1 piece if requested. I can name about 6 players who want 1 piece, so a majority want 2 piece; it would therefore be more sensible to follow the majority. 2 piece is the default option at Indian Wells Head Stringing Team

As for Wimbledon team, every member of the team that works during the main draw of the tournament are at least at ESRA Pro Tour Stringer Lvl 1, many are Pro Tour Stringer Lvl 2. Looking at the requirements for the USRSA Tournament stringer criteria, the ERSA is a lot more stringent (http://www.ersa-stringers.co.uk/pts-1--2-requirements.html)
The Gut ATW sounds like it would suck. The other rackets, no problem. Is there a time limit on the customization? It isn't listed.
 
The Gut ATW sounds like it would suck. The other rackets, no problem. Is there a time limit on the customization? It isn't listed.
agree here,,
what do you think is what their looking for by asking for this, the ATW with nat.gut??
just doing the crosses wears out the outer coating on the gut.. is their a way to maintain the coating longer? (this would be my concern, and reason why i always do 2pc on full gut)??
 
agree here,,
what do you think is what their looking for by asking for this, the ATW with nat.gut??
just doing the crosses wears out the outer coating on the gut.. is their a way to maintain the coating longer? (this would be my concern, and reason why i always do 2pc on full gut)??
You can use bow wax. Can get it at a sporting goods store in the hunting section. Comes in a tube just like stencil ink. Just rub in on.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
agree here,,
what do you think is what their looking for by asking for this, the ATW with nat.gut??
just doing the crosses wears out the outer coating on the gut.. is their a way to maintain the coating longer? (this would be my concern, and reason why i always do 2pc on full gut)??
A long time ago there was a 50/50 pattern used for stringing gut strings. Long story short it made the short side longer, but had some other pitfalls. If you wanted to cut down on wear on the long side using gut with an ATW pattern make the short side long and use it for more strings. For instance, you could run in 6 mains on the short side (16x19 pattern,) a bottom cross, 2 mains on the long side, another bottom cross, and then back up to tie off the short side at the head of the racket. Get creative and you can do more than that. I also find stringing a racket with a even number of crosses is easier on the strings than a racket with an odd number of crosses. YMMV but I believe you will notice a difference between an odd and even cross racket try it and see. Then depending on what works best for you run an extra cross with the short side (or not) so it always works out for you.

EDIT: But then again maybe the point of the exercise is to see how you handle the gut and don't wear it out stringing it.
 
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EDIT: But then again maybe the point of the exercise is to see how you handle the gut and don't wear it out stringing it.
i think this is it ^^^
"wearing out the gut", towards the end of the string job
i fan, i preweave 1 ahead, i make sure not to kink,, etc etc,, but just going through all thoes crosses "feels", like it wears out the string coating toward the bottom of the racquet
have you all notised this, or is this just me doing something wrong??
greasing the string would help, but i dont think thats something they would like to see someone do in a test situation
i can see how the 50/50 method would work alittle better, but again, not for all situations
 
If you are seeing that on the last couple cross strings, the string has a tendency to twist as you get to the bottom couple cross strings. Weave one string at a time like sewing . Or pull a loop as that will minimize the twist and string will not look worn.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
i think this is it ^^^
"wearing out the gut", towards the end of the string job
i fan, i preweave 1 ahead, i make sure not to kink,, etc etc,, but just going through all thoes crosses "feels", like it wears out the string coating toward the bottom of the racquet
have you all notised this, or is this just me doing something wrong??
greasing the string would help, but i dont think thats something they would like to see someone do in a test situation
i can see how the 50/50 method would work alittle better, but again, not for all situations
You are going to have the same number of crosses in the racket no matter how it is strung. All you said is great and don't forget you have to run that gut string through all the grommets for the mains on the long side and 2 on the short side before you start you crosses there is about 18 grommets where you can mess up the gut.
 
If you are seeing that on the last couple cross strings, the string has a tendency to twist as you get to the bottom couple cross strings. Weave one string at a time like sewing . Or pull a loop as that will minimize the twist and string will not look worn.
well i got a chance to put this to the test yesterday; fb nat.fut, 17g b.vsteam on a wil.triad xp5, 16/19, 5%prestretch
right away, i noticed weaving from left/right was easy (little friction),, however right/left had lots of friction,, typical 1 side more friction than the other
soo i went ahead and tried this suggestion of weaving one string at a time,,
this worked well, the bottom cross strings did not look/feel fatigued,,
however, this method shot my time up to 25minutes,, rrrgg. (this is something i can improve on, since this was my first time doing this method),,

i focus alot on string damage (among other things),, and this will help with nat.gut string fatigue
until i find a better way of stringing gut, ill stick to this..

just wanted to thank you guys for the suggestions and briging the topic for discussion..
 
The one weave at a time does work as well as pushing or pulling a loop of string and then pulling the end through. I prefer the one weave at a time, and the time it takes you to do this gets better with time.
 
Yes, the whole point of ATW full gut it to see how the stringer can handle the gut in that situation. It's one of the tougher things to do and tougher to do well. No, it isn't likely to happen often in a real world tournament situation, but if a stringer can handle this request, as well as the other aspects of the Pro Tour Stringer exam then they will likely be able to handle most things thrown at them.
 
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