WORLD NO. 1 (by year)

Discussion in 'Former Pro Player Talk' started by hoodjem, Oct 30, 2009.

  1. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    Urban, first of all my apologies if I misrepresented your views in any way. Since I define a world championship tour as a set of events used to determine year-end rankings, and I wanted to get PC1's definition about it, I mentioned in my post to him that Carlo also believed a 17-tournament (exact number debated) series was established in '64 to determine the year-end rankings. And I mentioned that you and Jeffrey also believed it, at least years ago when you were all here and posting about the topic. I didn't participate in the topic then because I knew too little about it, but I remember the posts. And like I've said to you in the recent past, I once found your discussions at Wikipedia with Carlo and Jeffrey, and I remember them still because they impressed me as very good discussions, focused hard on details but remaining civil.

    I did not mean to imply that you, Jeffrey and Carlo all referred to the 17-tournament series as a "championship tour" or that you all embraced it as an ideal system. In fact the one thing I remember most is that you all had criticisms of the series for not including more tournaments. Here's an example from Jeffrey: http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/inde...-laver-new-article.442302/page-9#post-7039602

    On that point I would actually tend to agree with all three of you. You've seen that for some years now PC1 and I have had a running disagreement about how heavily to weight championship tours. I don't think any of them were fully representative and I think all of them can come under the same criticism that has always been directed at the 1964 series -- even more so. If it's a big deal that the '64 tour lasted only about 180 days, well, the Budge-Vines tour of '39 lasted only 63 days. If it's a big deal that the '64 tour included all the 8-man tournaments but left out the 4-man tournaments, well no previous championship tour had ever included any tournament of any kind.

    That's why, I agree with you that later tournament circuits and ranking systems were better than those in '64, but imo '64 was better than any that came before -- in the messy world of the old pro tour.

    I risk saying that, at this moment when we've all suggested taking a break, not to stir things up but simply because this is an issue that's going to return again and again when we study other years, even those before Rosewall had ever picked up a racquet.

    I still agree we should take a break. Urban, I'd like at some point to continue discussing this with you. You get into the nuts-and-bolts and details which I appreciate. And I miss Jeffrey and Carlo's presence on this board, even if they did pick Laver as sole #1 for '64 :)
     
  2. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    NatF, We cannot disagree about historical facts! The 1964 tournament tour was for world championship and the most important parameter of that year.
     
  3. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    NonP, We should try to examine every doubtful year as exactly as we (especially krosero) did regarding 1964. There are so many years that did not have a clear-cut No.1.
     
  4. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    NatF, You are not far from truth: Rosewall in some moments of 1977 was actually an absolute top player, f.i. when he beat world's No.3, Gerulaitis, in straight sets and gave Connors a magnificent fight one day later...
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2016
  5. NatF

    NatF Talk Tennis Guru

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    Perhaps but that fact is irrelevant to me looking back with hindsight. The 1964 tournament tour was a flawed system.

    You could apply this across so many years though. All ATG's are able to show flashes of brilliance at young and old ages.
     
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  6. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    krosero, On one hand I can understand your frustration about some (to call them mildly) "negative" reactions and to stop posting in this thread, on the other hand I regret this your ( ultimate?) decision because it's always refreshing to read your findings, quotings and opinions and because those who find your illuminate discoveries and your explaining posts superfluous or even negative could think that you would agree with their negative judgment and that you would realize that you were wrong at your opinions and your (extremely mild!!) criticism. Truth should always prevail over bias and wrong claims!!

    It's good to know that you are proud of your huge work and of presenting it to your readers. I'm sure you are frustrated but you nevertheless are convinced that you did not wrong or write anything wrong (apart from your misinterpretation of a statement from urban).

    As written in my fundamental post to NonP, I yet claim that all posters and readers should agree about your great findings and historical facts and truth.

    I wonder a bit about your sentence that you don't need anyone (in this case me?) to agree with. I think you enjoy any positive reaction and support from your readers (even from myself ;-) ). So I hope my agreement and positive reaction was not unpleasant for you.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2016
  7. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    krosero, I don't think that the 1965 tour was more established than the 1964 tour. Both were well organized. But maybe I'm wrong.
     
  8. pc1

    pc1 G.O.A.T.

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    That's true, generally speaking I would think. Look at Federer in recent years. He has been superb and a threat to win every major.

    Gonzalez was great when he was young and won tournaments like the Howard Hughes in 1969 and 1970 defeating players like Roche, Ashe, Newcombe, Rosewall and Laver during those two years. And Gonzalez was 42 in 1970.

    Andres Gimeno won the French in 1972 in a year he would be 35.

    Laver even in a year he was 39 defeat Gerulaitis in the WCT Challenge Cup. I vaguely remember one of the points was a particularly athletic point by Laver in which he twisted his body in mid air to somehow put away a volley. Vic Braden couldn't believe it. Could be wrong but that's what I remember.

    McEnroe a few years ago almost beat Roddick in WTT. And McEnroe was in his fifties.
    http://www.tennisnow.com/News/Andy-Roddick,-John-McEnroe-Deliver-Crowd-Pleasing-.aspx

    Agassi was fantastic in his later thirties and of course as a teen.

    I don't think it's a coincidence that some of these players played on the Old Pro Tour. They learned how to conserve energy and play within the game because of the constant playing in the old days. It probably served them in good stead as they aged.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2016
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  9. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    NatF, A world championship is never irrelevant even though I agree that it's not the lone parameter to judge a year like 1964. The tour was not flawed. It was as it was. Even if it would be flawed, all players knew they had to succeed in that "flawed" system. It's a fact that Laver failed to win the tour and he knew it even as late as mid-1965. I trust the contemporary Rocket more than the recent "old" Rocket. Laver might be influenced recently by Joe's results (November 1964) and by Andrew's statistics. As earlier written, Laver's newer claim is as "objective" as Rosewall's claim from 1992 or 1993 when I talked to him. It's fitting that both Aussies claim to having been No.1 in 1964. That fits exactly to my old claim that both were No.1 that year...

    Rosewall's feats in 1977 are at least more impressing than those of others because he was 43 years old when he achieved them...
     
  10. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    NonP, Hours ago I sent you a longer post but it has vanished soon. Don't know why. I will try a second version.

    I don't want to call the 1964 tour this way or that way. I only tried to report facts: that the tour was the deciding tour for determining the pro end-year ranks. Weeks later the great researcher krosero found what I call the MISSING LINK which was demanded by Dan and others so strictly: that the 17 (or rather 18) tournament tour was the official "pro world championships" (a newspaper on August 25, see krosero's post).

    Your sentence is not right that Rosewall was "viewed by many as No.1". In fact Rosewall was the acknowledged 1964 pro champion, sanctioned by pro association, IPTPA! That's a difference between opinion, even reasonable opinion, and historical fact!

    I find it a scandal of high degree that after krosero's discoveries there still are a few posters (partly even you) who ignore his huge work and still claim Rosewall was not the official No.1. If I were krosero, I perhaps would think now: "Why have I done all that time-consuming examination of tennis history about the 1964 season and why have I found and published the "missing link" of that whole issue when still some people doubt or contradict my task, partly even with inadequate words?" But of course krosero is not me and I'm aware from one of his posts above that he probably does not regret his endeavour to find all that stuff and that he is still proud of his work (and that justified!).

    Please note: Every person is entitled to have his or her opinions. We can discuss if Rosewall or Gonzalez was the better player. We can discuss if Gimeno was stronger or Santana, if Jürgen Melzer is better or Gerald Melzer. But we just cannot discuss or disagree about well-known facts: that N.Y.C. is in the USA and not in Poland; that an elephant is bigger than an ant, and so on. The same way we cannot disagree that the 1964 tournament tour was the main parameter for the pro rankings and that Rosewall was the acknowledged No.1 pro. It's a clear fact! This even if we rightly can say from a modern point of view that Laver deserves a Co.-No.1 place for that year because he achieved very much in 1964. But we cannot ignore the fact that the Rocket failed at the main parameter of the year.

    I don't want to force all people of the world (or at least all posters in this forum) to accept my opinions (even though I nevertheless hope to being able to convince some people that Rosewall is a true GOAT candidate at least). I just demand (horribile dictu!) that every poster in this forum is ready to accept facts of tennis history equally if they are provided by krosero, by myself, by Dan, by Limpinhitter or by any other person who provides us with a true historical fact. And this even if a fact is pleasant for us or not! We can discuss if Ivanisevic had the better service or Sampras but we CANNOT discuss if Ivanisevic served more aces or Santoro! The latter is a fact!

    Hope you understand what I mean. Thanks.

    EDIT: I have corrected 1963 pro champion into 1964 pro champion (third paragraph)
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2016
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  11. pc1

    pc1 G.O.A.T.

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    I was going to look at 1983 and McEnroe versus Wilander but I realized in looking at the stats that McEnroe clearly looked better. McEnroe won Wimbledon, WCT and the Year End Masters. A super year. I'll try another disputed year tomorrow.
     
  12. urban

    urban Hall of Fame

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    Krosero, maybe we can - and i would be glad - to resume this discussion about the realities and mechanics of the old pro tour later on, when the smoke has cleared a bit. You know, that i appreciate Your research very much. If i would be better equipped with Internet sources, i would do the same, to find more contemporary sources. I am more a paper than an Internet man, but I know two things from other historical fields: every researcher is as good as his archive. And you have to do critical evaluations and analyses of those sources. Maybe we can get the solution, i wrote many years ago on the wiki article on Laver, that 1964 was a disputed year with Claims here and there, and Laver was undisputed pro champ in 1965.
    One thing i find most interesting among those press reports, is a statement by Laver given by Gerald Williams in 1964, that he (Laver) wants to play Wimbledon again. Remember this is 1964 and open Tennis light years away. Maybe Laver could see the future, or just maybe - this is a speculation - he had talked already with Herman David. David was the chairman of the All England Club and always present at Wembley, and he was eager to see Laver again at Wimbledon. And he was the chief influence of the 1967 Wimbledon pro and later the open Wimbledon.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2016
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  13. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    urban, I'm a bit disappointed that you did not react to my apology.
     
  14. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    Urban, there was nothing in the rest of that article about Herman David but I'll look for more material about the '64 Wembley and see what I can find.

    Thanks for your words about my research and yes, I hope we can figure out further specifics of the puzzle in much the same way as we've tried to do with the '59 series, or really with any other year. I find historical research to be very much detective work (that is not my actual line of work though someone once said I should have worked for Scotland Yard!) And I find it thrilling. I try to find clues in every little number and every little statement or word -- which is why I ask so many questions about source material and interviews. I like the way you and Jeffrey and Carlo worked through the material in what I have seen of your discussions and that's the kind of thing I'd like to be involved in.

    And I'm glad that you appreciate contemporary sources to the degree that you do. This is really something that I believe is revolutionizing the study of tennis history -- the uploading of so many newspaper archives to the internet. (Andrew's work, most notably, would not have been possible without this.) There are so many fields in academia where the historians would kill to have a daily newspaper record of the events they study, such as we are fortunate to now have for tennis.

    And what's been put online thus far is just the tip of the iceberg of what will eventually be available. Countless reports that I've posted here about one tour or another have only been uploaded recently to the internet. Six years ago we had very little apart from what we could find in books. So give it another 6 years and you can imagine how much more will be available.

    Even the archives I've looked through are just a piece of what's currently available. There are many archives from Europe that I simply don't have access to and which I would have trouble analyzing anyway because I don't know the various languages -- to say nothing of sources from other continents that the pros played in.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2016
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  15. Dan Lobb

    Dan Lobb Hall of Fame

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    Bobby, still with that "official" tour stuff? If it had been an official world championship tour, Buchholz would certainly have remembered it that way. If there had been an award, a trophy presentation, money, you can rest assured that Buchholz would have recalled that...didn't.
     
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  16. Limpinhitter

    Limpinhitter G.O.A.T.

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    If it's not too much trouble, please post it.
     
  17. Limpinhitter

    Limpinhitter G.O.A.T.

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    Hermann Göring's method was, repeat the same lie often enough, and the public will eventually accept it as the truth.
     
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  18. Dan Lobb

    Dan Lobb Hall of Fame

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    At this point, it seems clear that there was no trophy or money prize or presentation ceremony at the final event in Nice....in other words, the point system was not being used to qualify for anything.
    That means that the "tour" championship was being played for precisely nothing, no reason...this cannot qualify as a genuine world championship, no matter how confused some of the newspaper reporters were.
     
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  19. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    Mrs. or Mr. Limpinhitter, It's the greatest joke of the century that JUST YOU blame a serious poster for making a lie as you are the biggest liar yourself in this forum as you and all readers know. It's your next big lie that the tour of 1964 was not an official world championship tour. You have surely read krosero's many reports and quotings!! Your lies are obnoxious and utterly disgusting! Your comparison with Göring is mean and vile!!!
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2016
  20. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    Mr. Lobb, I'm stopping now to answer people WHO CANNOT READ serious posts (about the 1964 world championships)! Bye.
     
  21. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    urban, 1964 IS a disputed year. It WAS not a disputed year to be exact. In 1964 and early 1965 there was NO discussion about the status of Rosewall and Laver. From our modern point of view it IS a year to be disputed.
     
  22. eldanger25

    eldanger25 Professional

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    1977 is a fascinating year. I'll make the Connors argument (even though I ultimately feel that 1977 belongs to the Swede).

    1. He maintained his YE#1 ATP ranking position - which was the product of a flawed but widely publicized and accepted ranking system, and therefore a worthy data point.
    2. Unlike 1975, Connors won big events in 1977, most prominently the Dallas-YEC double and the WCT Challenge Cup. He was exceptionally good indoors that year.
    3. Connors was arguably most consistent across "prestigious" events, winning the YEC and Dallas, and making the finals of Wimbledon, the Open, and Philadelphia.
    4. Connors had the best results among the 1977 Big Three at the handful of events all three entered. Specifically:

    Connors: YEC winner, SW19/Open finalist
    Borg: SW19 winner, YEC finalist, lost in Open 4R.
    Vilas: Open winner, YEC semifinalist, lost in SW19 3R.

    5. He dragged a fractured right thumb (surely impacting his beloved backhand) to within 2 games of the Wimbledon title. Astonishingly close to clear sole or joint World #1 status for that season.

    Maybe this'll get the fires burning for 1977 or some other year - I agree that the law of diminishing returns is by now in play for 1964, at least for awhile.
     
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  23. pc1

    pc1 G.O.A.T.

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    Nice points for Connors for 1977!
     
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  24. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    eldanger25, Please try to avoid calling the US Open just "Open" as many tournaments have the epithet "Open", f.i. Australian Open, French Open, Italian Open.

    Please note: There are not only readers from the USA in this forum, and even your great and proud country is not identical with the whole world. Thanks.
     
  25. Dan Lobb

    Dan Lobb Hall of Fame

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    If the 1964 tour points were not used to qualify for anything, no trophy, no money, no title, then it could not have been a world championship of anything. Period.
     
  26. pc1

    pc1 G.O.A.T.

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    It was a very strange year. Bud Collins wrote that most experts picked Borg as number one for that year but as we have discussed, experts aren't necessarily correct. We do have more information nowadays. Borg won 13 of 20 tournaments including Wimbledon. Vilas I believe won around 17 tournaments including the French and the US Open. You already did some of the info on Connors.

    I will say this, I believe Borg was the best player for level of play that year. If Borg, Connors and Vilas all played a round robin of 50 matches (total of 100) against the other two I believe Borg would have the best record. Whether Borg had the best year is debatable. I think it's between Vilas and Borg.
     
  27. Limpinhitter

    Limpinhitter G.O.A.T.

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    As pc1 has exhaustively repeated (a great public service in the face of relentless, repeated, misrepresentations by a vociferous few), Butch Buchholz, one of the players on that tour, has conclusively confirmed that there was no World Championship tour in 1964.
     
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  28. eldanger25

    eldanger25 Professional

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    Bobby, no offense intended. "The Open" to me means the American national tennis championship and the British national golf championship - always has, always will.
     
  29. eldanger25

    eldanger25 Professional

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    I think Borg had the best year as well. Results across surfaces means a lot, and although he may not have dominated clay like Vilas that year (who camped out on the dirt), or been as strong indoors as Connors, Borg won big tournaments on all surfaces that year, unlike the other two.

    (Although as an aside he continued to have issues with outdoor hard courts - I don't think Borg won his first outdoor HC event until 1978, and only had one season (1979) where he won more than 1 such event across a calendar year.)

    The really interesting thing about 1977 is that any of the three guys was one match away from probably being sole #1 for the season. If Connors wins the fifth set of the Wimbledon final (which he may well have done if his thumb wasn't fractured), the crown could've been his - titles at Wimbledon, Dallas, and the YEC, alongside runs to the Open and Philly finals, is a hell of a year for a 1970s player. If Borg beat Connors at the YEC to go with his Wimbledon title and cross-surface results, I don't think Vilas has an argument. And if Vilas had beaten Tanner in the AO final, not even Borg's level of play could have bested that great rarity: a 3 slam season.
     
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  30. pc1

    pc1 G.O.A.T.

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    Excellent observation that all of these players were one match for being number one for the year.

    I think what a lot of experts problems with at the time had with Vilas' season was that many felt he cleaned up in smaller clay court tournaments to pad his totals. Nothing wrong with that. He was playing within the system and he did play super tennis that year.

    What I find odd in retrospect is that everyone at the time in 1977 considered Borg, Vilas and Connors as a level higher than any other player. It's now odd to think of Vilas on the Borg and Connors level but he was thought of that way. And Vilas was a great player capable of defeating Connors at times. The ATP has Vilas defeating Connors 4 out of 9 times which is about right I would think.
     
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  31. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    Limpinhitter: As krosero has exhaustively repeated (a great public service in the face of relentless, repeated, misrepresentations by a vociferous few), Butch Buchholz, one of the players of the tour, has conclusively confirmed there was a big and deciding tournament tour that determined the end-year rankings of the pros and Rosewall's place 1 in 1964. I trust more the contemporary long and clear article from Butch than a doubtful statement: we don't know how the question to him was, 52 years post festum. As krosero also has shown in numerous quotings from 1964 and 1965, the tournament tour was officially acknowledged as "Pro World Championships" (see August 25, 1964) and Rosewall was the undisputed No.1 pro in whole 1964 and even in the first months of 1965 even though Laver won 4 tournaments in January/February of 1965! I concede that I would have given the No.1 spot after the Australian tour to Laver in February 1965.
     
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  32. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    eldanger25, I did know that you did not intend any offense, but the title "(the) Open" for the US Open (and maybe the British golf championships) sound a bit arrogant as there are many "Open" events. I doubt that the French people call their GS tournament "the Open". They probably call it "the French Open".
     
  33. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    eldanger25, 1977 is a "classical" year where two or even three players have a reasonable claim to be No.1, similary to 1961, 1964, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1982.
     
  34. Dan Lobb

    Dan Lobb Hall of Fame

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    Buchholz has conclusively shown that there was no world championship tour for 1964.
     
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  35. timnz

    timnz Legend

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    What issue on Hard Courts are you referring to? Hard Courts were few and far between before 1978. I believe that is why you didn't see him win a title before then. You can't win them if they don't exist (well largely don't exist).
     
  36. eldanger25

    eldanger25 Professional

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    Tim, you are absolutely right to point out that outdoor hard court events were a smaller part of the tour back then than they are now. But they definitely existed, and some of them were pretty prestigious. A good half-dozen tournaments come to mind - Los Angeles, the SA Open in Johannesburg, Palm Springs, Las Vegas, the Tokyo Outdoor, and the WCT Challenge Cup - that were well regarded. I know there were several smaller WCT events on outdoor hard back then too.

    Before 1979, when he won Las Vegas and the newly outdoor HC Toronto event, Borg appeared at some of the above multiple times (he was a regular at Palm Springs, the WCT Challenge Cup, and the SA Open, and I think made at least one appearance at the Los Angeles event early in his career), and showed up to a few smaller outdoor HC tournaments in the American southwest through the late 1970s. Definitely not a large part of his calendar - I think he only played a few such tournaments a year - but worth mentioning.
     
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  37. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    When having a look into Bud Collins' encyclopedia for the Whats your Top 10 thread I found yet another remark about Rosewall being the acknowledged No. 1 in 1964: Bud mentioned "Rosewall the pro king" in the chapter on 1964. This a hint for all open-minded readers and posters. Some others will not be impressed by that quote because they already were not impressed at all by Butch's clear article and krosero's many serious quotings from 1964 and 1965...
     
  38. Limpinhitter

    Limpinhitter G.O.A.T.

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    Let’s review 1964, once again, for the benefit of the casual reader who might be mislead by the persistent historical revisionists on this board:

    - Laver lead Rosewall in total titles 11-10,

    - Laver lead Rosewall in pro major titles 2-1,

    - Laver lead Rosewall in total matches won 81 to 69,

    - Laver lead Rosewall in winning percentage 75% (81-27) to 70% (69-30),

    - Laver lead Rosewall in H2H matches by a dominating 15-4,

    Laver was #1 for 1964. Rosewall was #2.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2016
  39. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    Mrs. or Mr. Limpinhitter, It's you who misleads our readers since months with your lies and wrong data.

    Your stats here are correct (sic!) but they are not a proper answer to my quoting of Bud's sentence.

    Laver cannot have been the lone No.1 in 1964 because he failed at the -by far- most important parameter: the Pro World Championships.

    It's curious: You and a few other revisionists never deny Gonzalez a No.1 place in those years when he won the world championships, even when his No.1 place is doubtful as in 1961 when Rosewall had at least the same record. Only to push your darling you deny Rosewall his place as the official No.1 in 1964 and you even ignore all the official quotings and rankings of that year.

    By the way, you would increase your reputation if you, lately though, would apologize for your lies and correct your wrong Laver data...

    EDIT: The 1964 tour was more important than the Gonzalez tours because it included the pro majors.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2016
  40. pc1

    pc1 G.O.A.T.

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    There is a lack of consistency above. The person discusses the 1964 Pro Tour as if it was a World Championship Tour but it was clearly stated by Butch Buchholz (who played on the tour) that it wasn't a World Championship tour. This has been mentioned a million times yet the poster above ignores that. Yet that same person argues for another player instead of Gonzalez for 1961 despite the fact Gonzalez won the 1961 World Championship Tour, more tournaments and a Pro Major.

    So I guess a World Championship Tour is important if it helps your player but you forget about it when it doesn't help your player.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2016
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  41. hoodjem

    hoodjem G.O.A.T.

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    That would appear to be the case.
     
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  42. Limpinhitter

    Limpinhitter G.O.A.T.

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    In addition, apparently, someone thinks it helps to bolster Rosewall's case to continually and falsely declaim that the 130 day tour of 1964 was a World Championship Tour.

    In any event, the record for 1964 is indisputable - Laver lead Rosewall in every material respect.
     
  43. NatF

    NatF Talk Tennis Guru

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    With respect to Bud he was likely just going off Mccauleys work. Unless there's new research in that chapter it does nothing to sway my opinion.

    The conversation had been put to one side but apparently someone can't let go of 1964. Not sure why it matters this much what anonymous Internet people think. The discussion has passed the point of being pointless.
     
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  44. pc1

    pc1 G.O.A.T.

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    :confused:
    True enough. I committed a major sin of discussing it again. I beg forgiveness!!

    Never should have responded to that poster.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2016
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  45. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    Limpin, That's your next lie: Nobody during the last few weeks (or longer) in our discussion has claimed the 130 day tour was the world championship tour. The 130 day tour was only a PART of the official world championships, as I have explained you several times!!!

    Rosewall does not need to be bolstered, neither regarding 1964 when he was the UNDISPUTED No.1 player (as Buchholz has written) not generally as he has won the most majors at all plus keeps several other records such as achieving three consecutive Channel Slams.
     
  46. Dan Lobb

    Dan Lobb Hall of Fame

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    Let's hear it for your boy, Bobby.

    Hooray for Muscles!!!
     
  47. BobbyOne

    BobbyOne G.O.A.T.

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    NatF, My Bud's quoting was just an additional remark to the MANY others that were known before, coming from the crystal clear Buchholz article ("Rosewall the undisputed No.1 player"), from other sources ("World of Tennis" yearbooks) and especially from that huge researching work provided by krosero who gave us many different quotings about the official pro world championships of 1964 and the several rankings 1964/1965 where Rosewall was No.1. Every serious and non-biased reader accepted that all. Only idiots and Laver-biased posters still try to distort historical facts!

    I don't understand that even you (as a non-idiot) don't resspect krosero's huge contribution!

    Regarding Bud and Joe: Nice try. The next of the Rosewall haters' hostile assumptions and attacks against me! For your interest: Bud called Rosewall the pro king already before Joe's book has been published! He called Muscles that way at least in the 1994 and 1997 issues. Joe's book was published in 2000. (I don't have Bud's 1980 issue but probably he has Rosewall the same way even there).

    Get real! The conversation is still alive as there is the serious group taht acknowledges Rosewall's status in 1964 and the other group, the Laver-biased group! The discussion became almost pointless because of a few ignorant posters who tried and still try to distort tennis history. It's a shame. Thought you would be a bit more serious than Limpinhitter & Co. ...
     
  48. NatF

    NatF Talk Tennis Guru

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    Yeah I just feel at this point there's no way any party is changing their position so what's the point...
     
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  49. Limpinhitter

    Limpinhitter G.O.A.T.

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    Dan, let me ask you a question. Do you think that Rosewall was the undisputed #1 player for the year 1964? Consider the following:

    - Laver lead Rosewall in total titles 11-10,
    - Laver lead Rosewall in pro major titles 2-1,
    - Laver lead Rosewall in total matches won 81 to 69,
    - Laver lead Rosewall in winning percentage 75% (81-27) to 70% (69-30),
    - Laver lead Rosewall in H2H matches by a dominating 15-4.

    What do you think? Rosewall, undisputed #1 for 1964?
     
  50. NatF

    NatF Talk Tennis Guru

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    You're obsessed Bobby. Get over it. I don't care who was #1 in 1964 I have my opinion and I think it's well supported by the statistics - I've acknowledged that the media at the time had Rosewall #1. In that vein I don't think your position is indefensible.

    However the conversation should be dead, it's only alive because you can't let go of any Rosewall related quibble. You won't convince any of your 'opponents' to change their opinions.
     
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