Worst day since awhile

FiReFTW

Legend
How do you mentally get over this quickly?

Ive had an absolutely horrible tennis performance today, in doubles and then singles, absolute travesty, missing tons of easy balls, shanking all over the place... after working hard this week on certain aspects of my game and really having some nice days in between where I felt like I really got better, today I feel like sh*t and feel like im much worse as a player than I was even 1 year ago after this performance.

Man its so tough mentally when you have such days, it really is, can someone else relate to this?
 

Fairhit

Semi-Pro
Yes, I've had my fair share of $#i+y days, those days where you don't want to have anything to do with a tennis racquet, what needs to be done is to forget about it, we all have bad days and is something even the best have to deal with, I try to think about my poor prefomance and the reasons for it, then I'll have something to work on and I can get something positive from a bad day.
 
Accept that you'll have occasional fantastic days and horrible days. In the big scheme of things, it is irrelevant; play the long game and focus on the process.

Try this exercise: write down on a piece of paper all of your negative attitudes and emotions you went through during and after that bad stretch and then burn it. Now you've got a clean slate.
 

AlexR

Rookie
This summer I lost at set 6-0 to a 60+ year old woman. Couldn’t get a shot in the court. Obviously my problem was that I very quickly became frustrated and forgot every fundamental I ever learned about the game. When I’m playing well, I can hang with my friend who was a really good DIII college player so I’m not horrible. It was 100% mental.
 

FiReFTW

Legend
Post a video. :)
ha ha, funny, I wanted to leave the court after 30 minutes of playing yet alone watching miself on video.

Actually threw the racquet around 3 times (never happened before to me that it got to me so much) and hit a few balls full power in the net when making a mistake, and hit the net a few times with racquet.

I completely lost it and I wanted to just leave, didn't feel like playing at all.
 

Born_to_slice

Hall of Fame
ha ha, funny, I wanted to leave the court after 30 minutes of playing yet alone watching miself on video.

Actually threw the racquet around 3 times (never happened before to me that it got to me so much) and hit a few balls full power in the net when making a mistake, and hit the net a few times with racquet.

I completely lost it and I wanted to just leave, didn't feel like playing at all.
Watching yourself playing bad is not enjoyable but at least you can try to see what you're doing wrong. I actually played a horrible match recently and made highlights of all my UEs. had a real good laugh at myself.

What's your main problem? Tightness maybe? It's hard to transfer stuff from practice to match play, you know. Relaxed mind the most of all.
 

FiReFTW

Legend
Watching yourself playing bad is not enjoyable but at least you can try to see what you're doing wrong. I actually played a horrible match recently and made highlights of all my UEs. had a real good laugh at myself.

What's your main problem? Tightness maybe? It's hard to transfer stuff from practice to match play, you know. Relaxed mind the most of all.
I didnt see the ball well, I was uninspired and low energy, feet were lazy, extremely bad decision making, my service games were also very poor
 

Notirouswithag

Professional
I take a shot of fireball to tell myself its not worth getti g mad about, seems to help me relax and not care as much


Your going to have good days and crappy days, its noral, just dont dwell on it
 

ptuanminh

Hall of Fame
Every tennis day is a good day :) . Keep that in mind. Seriously I have never had a bad day in the last 2 years. Happy go lucky.
If your opponent is better, you will learn something.
If your opponent is as good as you, you will get a workout.
If your opponent sucks, you will beat them anyway.
Whats the problem?
 

FiReFTW

Legend
Every tennis day is a good day :) . Keep that in mind. Seriously I have never had a bad day in the last 2 years. Happy go lucky.
If your opponent is better, you will learn something.
If your opponent is as good as you, you will get a workout.
If your opponent sucks, you will beat them anyway.
Whats the problem?
The problem is when you play like sh*t, how do you not get that?

Have you never played like sh*t before?
 

user92626

Legend
How do you mentally get over this quickly?

Ive had an absolutely horrible tennis performance today, in doubles and then singles, absolute travesty, missing tons of easy balls, shanking all over the place... after working hard this week on certain aspects of my game and really having some nice days in between where I felt like I really got better, today I feel like sh*t and feel like im much worse as a player than I was even 1 year ago after this performance.

Man its so tough mentally when you have such days, it really is, can someone else relate to this?
I'm also in a funk (if I let myself be). I've lost twice to someone whom I expected to beat and I also didn't get a sense that my dubs skill was respected by some people.

It's a tough pill given my competitive nature but I have or I am learning to get over this kind of pain. (Sometimes it still feels annoying but other times I really feel ok). It actually feels good when I take time to sort it out. I consider it a learning experience. I take it as my wish being granted as I always wanted a worthwhile, accessible opponent so here is that opportunity. The annoying feeling has come less and less and in its place is good feeling -- I feel proud of myself for being able to compartmentalize it, giving it a proper perspective.

It is absolutely ridiculous to expect, and it is impossible, to go through life without any setbacks.
 

Dragy

Hall of Fame
Just yesterday I played some doubles sets, and it started awful. I couldn’t hit my groundies, and my second serve had no other way but below the net cord. We lost 1st set badly and discussed switching teams...
I stayed frustrated. However, we had 2 more competitive sets, I did may good plays at net. But never came back from mental dip: it was only driving home when I realized there were some positives. Should I recognize them during the match, would it pump me and raise my level? Pros do try to shift from negativeness on any occasion...
 

FiReFTW

Legend
Just yesterday I played some doubles sets, and it started awful. I couldn’t hit my groundies, and my second serve had no other way but below the net cord. We lost 1st set badly and discussed switching teams...
I stayed frustrated. However, we had 2 more competitive sets, I did may good plays at net. But never came back from mental dip: it was only driving home when I realized there were some positives. Should I recognize them during the match, would it pump me and raise my level? Pros do try to shift from negativeness on any occasion...
Looks like you had a horrible day like me!

I actually didn't even play average, the strange thing is I had some points that I played really really good, some really awesome points and somehow really managed to focus on those, but had really super low dips where I was missing such easy shots and putaways that I should be making in sleep, many many times. Focus was all UP and DOWN the whole time.
Serving one game and hitting 3 aces, serving another game and hitting 3 double faults, just crazy.
 

Toby14

Professional
@FiReFTW I learned a lot on the mental game by listening to Jeff Greenwald audio, he actually provide useful skills when your game is off:


got it 2nd hand from Amazon:


His book is also a great resource:


Cheers, Toby
 
Looks like you had a horrible day like me!

I actually didn't even play average, the strange thing is I had some points that I played really really good, some really awesome points and somehow really managed to focus on those, but had really super low dips where I was missing such easy shots and putaways that I should be making in sleep, many many times. Focus was all UP and DOWN the whole time.
Serving one game and hitting 3 aces, serving another game and hitting 3 double faults, just crazy.
- Did you get a good night's sleep?
- How much did you drink the night before?
- Were you dehydrated?
- Did you have a good warmup?
- What was your frame of mind prior to the match?
- Were you thinking about other things?
- Were the match circumstances radically different than normal [ie your coach was watching]?
 

Bagel Boy

New User
(How I deal)

As tennis mimics life, inevitably you'll have a bad day. Your attitude may be neutral, but seemingly the universe is conspiring against you. Nothing you can do, accept it and keep it moving, it's a writeoff.

Give yourself today and only today until midnight to let out any frustrations regarding this day, but after that...it's a new day, nothing to do with yesterday.

==
I've recently been in the same boat; let down my dubs partner and blew two matches I "should" have won. It was almost the harder I tried, the worst things got.

While mulling over every garbage point in my head at work, I realized I was forcing the tennis, and not letting it come to me, snowballing into self destruction. Next week, I had zero expectations of how I should be playing and I let it happen...absolutely destroyed dubs at the net.
 

ptuanminh

Hall of Fame
The problem is when you play like sh*t, how do you not get that?

Have you never played like sh*t before?
Yes i have. everybody has days like that. but whether i win or lose, i still have food for dinner hehe.
The more sessions you play, the more samples you get of your abilities and mental strength.
A very low day or a very high level day is not an indicator of your overall game. Don't let it bother you. The best thing is to learn something from it. Bad days are there because there are some shots that you are not comfortable with (enough). Find those and practice them.
 
While mulling over every garbage point in my head at work, I realized I was forcing the tennis, and not letting it come to me, snowballing into self destruction. Next week, I had zero expectations of how I should be playing and I let it happen...absolutely destroyed dubs at the net.
Sports psychologist Patrick Cohen emphasizes having high confidence but no expectations. He also notes that people tend to equate the two and he thinks they are markedly different.
 

mcs1970

Hall of Fame
Lots of good advice on this thread. However you made a similar thread before and got most of this advice. So obviously that’s not helping.

IMO you are driven to succeed. However your expectations are unrealistic. Even players who played for years and are much better than you go through bad days. Don’t beat yourself up. Keep working and improving. However also learn to forgive yourself and learn to enjoy a beer after the game. Else you will turn into a basket case like TTPS.
 

mcs1970

Hall of Fame
I've made the same comment on previous threads. I get the impression he feels like he should be able to execute near-perfectly based on how much he's practiced and it just ain't so.
Yes. I remember you saying that. Which is why I said he has already got all this advice in previous threads he has started on similar topics.
 

Kevo

Legend
I had a bad game in my doubles match on Saturday. Got what I thought was clearly a bad call on a serve and was so frustrated I blew my serve game and flubbed a couple of points on the game after that. It wasn't a normal bad call either. No one on the court heard the out call and the other 3 players were playing the point when the 4th guy just walked off to return on the next point. If it was a tournament match I probably would have argued for the point since his teammate clearly thought it was in since he was playing the point and confused as well.

Anyway, at some point you just have to let the past go and focus on now.

@FiReFTW, what goals did you go into the matches with? Did you manage to keep those goals in mind, or come back to them after getting off track? I find it much easier to play well when I am actually trying to do something as opposed to just reacting. In the match I mentioned when I finally woke up out of my angry, I got robbed, state the only thing I could focus on at first was just to get my feet moving before the serve and watch the ball. Once I started "doing" something I was able to get some good returns in and get into some points. By the second set things were back to normal and I was playing decent. Managing your mental state is one of the most important things to learn to get good at match play and it takes practice like anything else.

In fact I think you've just inspired me to make a new challenge for myself. I am not sure if I've ever played a set where I started every point with my mind focused on doing something. I know I've had games where that's been true, but I'm not sure I've ever made it through a whole set let alone a match where my mind was in every point. That's going to be my new goal.
 

tlm

G.O.A.T.
How do you mentally get over this quickly?

Ive had an absolutely horrible tennis performance today, in doubles and then singles, absolute travesty, missing tons of easy balls, shanking all over the place... after working hard this week on certain aspects of my game and really having some nice days in between where I felt like I really got better, today I feel like sh*t and feel like im much worse as a player than I was even 1 year ago after this performance.

Man its so tough mentally when you have such days, it really is, can someone else relate to this?
The best thing you can do is not dwell on it and just forget it. We all have those days sometimes you can play crappy for a week or so. One of my hitting partners that’s been playing a lot longer than me once told me to quit worrying about those bad days. He said if you let this game get to you it will drive you crazy and just make it worse.

After thinking abut it I thought back to my days of playing hockey and normally I was a good player but there were times when nothing would work and I just had to play through it. It’s no different than other sports there are a lot of pro athletes that play bad at times but they will come out of their funk eventually. So will you just laugh it off and say wow I had a bad day and move on.
 

xFullCourtTenniSx

Hall of Fame
ha ha, funny, I wanted to leave the court after 30 minutes of playing yet alone watching miself on video.

Actually threw the racquet around 3 times (never happened before to me that it got to me so much) and hit a few balls full power in the net when making a mistake, and hit the net a few times with racquet.

I completely lost it and I wanted to just leave, didn't feel like playing at all.
Poor mentality.

I didnt see the ball well, I was uninspired and low energy, feet were lazy, extremely bad decision making, my service games were also very poor
Poor mentality.

The problem is when you play like sh*t, how do you not get that?

Have you never played like sh*t before?
Poor mentality.

Maybe he never played "like sh*t" before in his view, just bad or below average. People with good mentality are good at preventing their game from tanking, and even if they can't, they still won't get disturbed and think they're playing "like sh*t", just not as great as they would hope. They dig deep, find shots that work, and make adjustments to the ones that don't.

I used to have a similar mentality. "F*ck me, I'm playing like garbage." "God damn it, I'm playing like sh*t right now!" It never helps other than to slide you further into a less competitive mindset. Sometimes, you can sort out your emotions just long enough to retain focus and play well again for a few points, and if you're lucky you string enough points along to gain momentum and turn your mindset around. But usually, you hit another error and your mentality tanks again and you lose focus.

Then I watched this video and it changed my mindset.

I'd still say I'm mentally weak, but in a short time I became a much stronger player mentally. I became far more competitive as a player because I could control my head a little better. In practice, I might still get a hot head, but in matches I'm a lot more controlled. I'm beating players that should be able to easily beat me based on technique (more consistent in practice, more spin on groundstrokes, as much if not slightly more pace). It's all because I don't care who my opponent is anymore, or how they hit, or how many mistakes I make or how bad I play. I focus on what I need to do to win, and that is to execute the highest percentage game plan I can execute, to push myself to move as well as I can and fight for every ball, and to control my head.

Federer, Nadal, and Djokovic are human, and yet how do they win so many matches? They must have plenty of off days, and yet they keep winning. It's because they don't use excuses like "I'm playing like sh*t" to stop them from doing what needs to be done. They might admit to not playing well, but they'll also praise their opponent for playing well, maintaining that level, and doing what needed to be done to close the match out before the big 3 could come back in the match. You can be sure that the big 3 did the best they could to throw their opponent off their game and bring their game down to their sub-par level as well, but the other player player didn't let it happen. It happens, sometimes you don't play your best and your opponent is playing very well. It sucks, but you won't regret it as much or feel as bad if you did everything in your power, physically and mentally, to turn things around and win that match. You left everything on the court, and that's all you could do.
 

AlexR

Rookie
Does this sound familiar? You are missing a few early, get frustrated. Start trying to kill the ball. Realize what you’re doing and then dial back too much, weakly dump a ball or float it way long. That makes you feel worse and at that point, a set and a match can be over quickly.

A few things I found that help-

Remember you know how to hit the ball. You know how a good swing feels. Have that memory in mind as you take your next shot.

Pretend you’re giving a lesson. Correct the mistake you just made as if you’re your own student. Then take over as the teacher and demonstrate how it’s done.

Remember it doesn’t matter.
 
How do you mentally get over this quickly?

Ive had an absolutely horrible tennis performance today, in doubles and then singles, absolute travesty, missing tons of easy balls, shanking all over the place... after working hard this week on certain aspects of my game and really having some nice days in between where I felt like I really got better, today I feel like sh*t and feel like im much worse as a player than I was even 1 year ago after this performance.

Man its so tough mentally when you have such days, it really is, can someone else relate to this?
I may have pointed you to this before but listen to the Essential Tennis guy analyze Federer v Coric at the BNP Paribas when Federer was down a set and a break and was shanking balls all over the place:


 

xFullCourtTenniSx

Hall of Fame
I may have pointed you to this before but listen to the Essential Tennis guy analyze Federer v Coric at the BNP Paribas when Federer was down a set and a break and was shanking balls all over the place:


Never been much of a fan of this channel technique-wise (only thing I like is pronating on every serve), but their talk of live match play is good stuff. I like how Federer also tries to wipe all the potential excuses he has out of his mind, as it's been something I've actively been trying to do more of. At the very least, I try to put it in the perspective of "this wasn't great for/from me, but I could've maybe tried doing this or that to deal with it or turn it to my advantage". Not everything turns out the way we like, but the same goes for our opponents. In the end, it comes down to who handles the day better.
 

Chadalina

Legend
How do you mentally get over this quickly?

Ive had an absolutely horrible tennis performance today, in doubles and then singles, absolute travesty, missing tons of easy balls, shanking all over the place... after working hard this week on certain aspects of my game and really having some nice days in between where I felt like I really got better, today I feel like sh*t and feel like im much worse as a player than I was even 1 year ago after this performance.

Man its so tough mentally when you have such days, it really is, can someone else relate to this?
Enjoy your bad days, they wont be around forever :) Swinging too fast or poppin your head up?

Believe it or not we get the most benefit on our bad days. Like losing a match, lets you know what to work on.

You dont get over it, you remember it when you next start to slip (another bad day) and how you fixed it then.

Emotion shows effort, you will continue to get better as long as you have that.
 
How do you mentally get over this quickly?

Ive had an absolutely horrible tennis performance today, in doubles and then singles, absolute travesty, missing tons of easy balls, shanking all over the place... after working hard this week on certain aspects of my game and really having some nice days in between where I felt like I really got better, today I feel like sh*t and feel like im much worse as a player than I was even 1 year ago after this performance.

Man its so tough mentally when you have such days, it really is, can someone else relate to this?
There is this video of a match between Graf and Seles at the 1999 Australian Open. Graf raced away to an early lead, but after serving for the set at 5-4 failed to win a single GAME for the next 8 games in a row and faced match points at 5-7 and 0-5 before managing to avoid the ignominy of a bagel. Still lost that set 6-1 and with it a match she looked in total control of.

My point being it can happen to the greatest. Imagine how frustrating it would have been to suddenly start spraying forehands and double fault after playing flawless tennis in the first few games and this at a Slam level.

So watch it and know that these days happen. Such is tennis. Had a terrible day yesterday, repeatedly netted forehands and played much better today and even had mishits drop in. No idea what, if anything, I did differently today. Other than not thinking at all about yesterday.
 

FiReFTW

Legend
After sleeping over it its behind me. Now im ready and motivated to keep on working hard again this week.

- Did you get a good night's sleep?
- How much did you drink the night before?
- Were you dehydrated?
- Did you have a good warmup?
- What was your frame of mind prior to the match?
- Were you thinking about other things?
- Were the match circumstances radically different than normal [ie your coach was watching]?
Yes i slept well.

Drink? Alco? None

Was not dehydrated.

Warmup sucked this guy keeps hitting full power and going for winners and missing in warmups, already told him before but hes stubborn so whatever.

My frame of mind was i had rly good days from monday to thursday where i was very happy with my level, but didnt play for 2 days now so a bit worried how my feel will be and hoping i would perform well.

Coach was not watching but I always want to perform well for everyone around where im playing.

BTW. 3 aces in a row followed by 3 double faults in another game is not going through highs or lows. That tells me you don’t have a good 2nd serve.
That is already clear to me, thats why its 1 of the 3 main things im going to focus on my practice sessions on this winter.

I've made the same comment on previous threads. I get the impression he feels like he should be able to execute near-perfectly based on how much he's practiced and it just ain't so.
Yes I expect a certain level of miself, I want to play good level tennis already, some junior u18 girls from my coach are UTR8 level tennis and I want to be competitive with them, it rly drives me and I feel very competitive in my mind and always when they do some drills I want to top them, but i know its overly optimistic of miself to be at that level so soon, its crazy they play for 8+ years and have played hundreds upon hundreds of matches, but i think its good to have something like this that drives you and makes you work hard.

@FiReFTW, what goals did you go into the matches with? Did you manage to keep those goals in mind, or come back to them after getting off track? I find it much easier to play well when I am actually trying to do something as opposed to just reacting. In the match I mentioned when I finally woke up out of my angry, I got robbed, state the only thing I could focus on at first was just to get my feet moving before the serve and watch the ball. Once I started "doing" something I was able to get some good returns in and get into some points. By the second set things were back to normal and I was playing decent. Managing your mental state is one of the most important things to learn to get good at match play and it takes practice like anything else.

In fact I think you've just inspired me to make a new challenge for myself. I am not sure if I've ever played a set where I started every point with my mind focused on doing something. I know I've had games where that's been true, but I'm not sure I've ever made it through a whole set let alone a match where my mind was in every point. That's going to be my new goal.
Had great week but didnt play for 2 days so was a but worried how il perform.

Enjoy your bad days, they wont be around forever :) Swinging too fast or poppin your head up?

Believe it or not we get the most benefit on our bad days. Like losing a match, lets you know what to work on.

You dont get over it, you remember it when you next start to slip (another bad day) and how you fixed it then.

Emotion shows effort, you will continue to get better as long as you have that.
We were 5:2 up, in both sets, thrn lost 5:7 and 6:7
Actually played some rly good points and a few horrible misses up to 5:2 but after that it got way worse I got more tense.

Like i said 50 or 60% of the points were fine some extremely good.
But 40% were just horrible, easy volley poach misses and stuff like that, and i shanked alot of balls usually i rarely do, which shows mx focus was messed up.
 

FiReFTW

Legend
There is this video of a match between Graf and Seles at the 1999 Australian Open. Graf raced away to an early lead, but after serving for the set at 5-4 failed to win a single GAME for the next 8 games in a row and faced match points at 5-7 and 0-5 before managing to avoid the ignominy of a bagel. Still lost that set 6-1 and with it a match she looked in total control of.

My point being it can happen to the greatest. Imagine how frustrating it would have been to suddenly start spraying forehands and double fault after playing flawless tennis in the first few games and this at a Slam level.

So watch it and know that these days happen. Such is tennis. Had a terrible day yesterday, repeatedly netted forehands and played much better today and even had mishits drop in. No idea what, if anything, I did differently today. Other than not thinking at all about yesterday.
Very similar to yesterday if u read my last post!
 

Chadalina

Legend
Like i said 50 or 60% of the points were fine some extremely good.
But 40% were just horrible, easy volley poach misses and stuff like that, and i shanked alot of balls usually i rarely do, which shows mx focus was messed up.
If it happens again tomorrow what changes are you going to make?
 
Yes I expect a certain level of miself, I want to play good level tennis already, some junior u18 girls from my coach are UTR8 level tennis and I want to be competitive with them, it rly drives me and I feel very competitive in my mind and always when they do some drills I want to top them, but i know its overly optimistic of miself to be at that level so soon, its crazy they play for 8+ years and have played hundreds upon hundreds of matches, but i think its good to have something like this that drives you and makes you work hard.
So... what I think of this is that on the one hand, it is good to have ambitious LONG RANGE GOALS and work hard towards them. On the other, having these expectations in mind when you are actually playing a match can hurt you, ESPECIALLY when things don't go as per plan.

When Sampras creamed Agassi in the 99 Wimbledon final, he was asked how he felt and he said he was numb. He wasn't thinking of anything at all. And that's as it should be. You don't want to think about how you are playing way worse or better than in practice or about how awful the game or set score is, how you failed to consolidate the break, etc. Be calm but alert. Stay completely in the moment. Your mind will guide you to solutions if you get out of its way. I mentioned how I kept netting forehands yesterday. What I did after a while was to start throwing in forehand slices which I almost never hit. Also going for less pace and more trajectory on the forehands without moonballing. Even though I still lost every game I played that day, I liked, upon reflection, that I had tried to work my way through it instead of folding up in surrender.

I don't judge people for throwing or smashing the racquet but I personally have NEVER done it. I find that when I play well, more than anything technically different, I am in a mental equilibrium, not reacting too much either to the points I played well or to the ones I botched and just staying focused. I hit a OH TS BH winner off a squat today. It was nice to see the ball fly. But I wasn't aiming for that. I just reacted to the ball. And therefore, I didn't follow it up with extravagant attempts at hitting even more blistering backhands. If anything, I was slicing a lot today because I know it bothers my opponent and also because the balls were old and not bouncing much.

I know it's not easy to find that mental space everytime, or at least it isn't easy for me. But if there's anything worth aspiring for in a match, it's that. Even losses don't hurt when you know you played sensibly and to the best of your ability without trying too hard to do things you are not capable of.
 

sredna42

Hall of Fame
You're fatigued but don't realize it. I call it tennis depletion lol. Take a few days or a week off tennis and do other things, let your body and mind recharge
 

mcs1970

Hall of Fame
Someone had posted this long ago, and of all the good advice I have got on this forum, this has been the best. I have repeated it a few times too.

Basically make your opponent run to his right, to his left, make him come forward, make him run back. Mix those things up. If you do all that and he beats you, shake his hand and enjoy a beer after the match.

Take analysis, Wadlaw, everythng out. Don’t think of winners. Instead focus on keeping the ball in play so that your opponent will get a good aerobic workout. Shift your mindset from a player to a coach who is feeding him balls.
 
Someone had posted this long ago, and of all the good advice I have got on this forum, this has been the best. I have repeated it a few times too.

Basically make your opponent run to his right, to his left, make him come forward, make him run back. Mix those things up. If you do all that and he beats you, shake his hand and enjoy a beer after the match.

Take analysis, Wadlaw, everythng out. Don’t think of winners. Instead focus on keeping the ball in play so that your opponent will get a good aerobic workout. Shift your mindset from a player to a coach who is feeding him balls.
This, so much. Another way I would put it is don't be afraid to get hit off the court. Hit the ball only as hard as YOU can without missing more often than not. Don't press in trying to outhit the other guy. Rally in aggressive neutral mode and be alert to opportunities to hit drops or approach-volley.
 

mcs1970

Hall of Fame
This, so much. Another way I would put it is don't be afraid to get hit off the court. Hit the ball only as hard as YOU can without missing more often than not. Don't press in trying to outhit the other guy. Rally in aggressive neutral mode and be alert to opportunities to hit drops or approach-volley.
Yep. We all want to crush the ball like Federer or Nadal. They are not just pros but in the all time greatest discussions.

@FiReFTW look at the 5.0 guy video you posted yesterday. Let him be your model. If you watch someone like Brian Su, he also wins a ton that way. Nothing flashy. Just chokes other high level players to death with his consistency.
 

ptuanminh

Hall of Fame
Someone had posted this long ago, and of all the good advice I have got on this forum, this has been the best. I have repeated it a few times too.

Basically make your opponent run to his right, to his left, make him come forward, make him run back. Mix those things up. If you do all that and he beats you, shake his hand and enjoy a beer after the match.

Take analysis, Wadlaw, everythng out. Don’t think of winners. Instead focus on keeping the ball in play so that your opponent will get a good aerobic workout. Shift your mindset from a player to a coach who is feeding him balls.
Good advice. However, i think people are usually good only certain things. I am a baseliner and i cant really hit good drop shots or attacking slice. Trying this in a match will probably have negative effect on my game.
So maybe, do everything in your repertoire, go for riskier shots, and if those don't work, accept that you lose :).
 

mcs1970

Hall of Fame
Good advice. However, i think people are usually good only certain things. I am a baseliner and i cant really hit good drop shots or attacking slice. Trying this in a match will probably have negative effect on my game.
So maybe, do everything in your repertoire, go for riskier shots, and if those don't work, accept that you lose :).
You don’t have to hit a perfect drop shot or an attacking slice or a perfect unreturned lob. The advice I got was to think like a coach who is feeding balls. That coach wants the client to get to the ball. If your client(in this case your opponent) makes you pay for not hitting perfect shots that’s fine. At least you made him run around.
 

ChaelAZ

Legend
Meh. I am having the worst season (by far) that I have had in all my years of playing leagues. It is almost comical, if it wasn't so annoying.

But, I just keep plugging along trying to fix a few things and overcome some other issues to get on the right side of scorelines. Gotta keep reminding myself to worry about competing and not winning. That's the biggest thing for me.
 

ptuanminh

Hall of Fame
You don’t have to hit a perfect drop shot or an attacking slice or a perfect unreturned lob. The advice I got was to think like a coach who is feeding balls. That coach wants the client to get to the ball. If your client(in this case your opponent) makes you pay for not hitting perfect shots that’s fine. At least you made him run around.
When my opponent does this kind of thing, hitting shots that are obviously not their strength, I am actually happy. One, he is trying to get lucky, he might get a few points, but it will catch up with him. I just need to wait. Two, he is tired (maybe), not being able to use his strengths, so i don't have to worry too much, just focus on getting those silly balls.
If my opponent is better or same level as me, it is the last thing i want to do to give them mental reinforcement like that.
 
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