Worst traffic in the country?

#1
This has to be one of the worst commutes in the country. 680 North from Milpitas/San Jose towards Pleasanton.
1 hour 20 minutes to travel 10 miles. That is the normal rush hour commute. There is absolutely no mass transit option.
I think I can walk faster.
:(

 
#2
This has to be one of the worst commutes in the country. 680 North from Milpitas/San Jose towards Pleasanton.
1 hour 20 minutes to travel 10 miles. That is the normal rush hour commute. There is absolutely no mass transit option.
I think I can walk faster.
:(

Wow !!!
 
#3


It's all relative. Years ago, I recall this drive in So Cal. Left Thousand Oaks in the late morning. Took me less than 1.5 hours to make it down to Huntington Beach (~75 miles). Drove back up to Thousand Oaks during rush hour traffic. Huge mistake... took me nearly 4.5 hours to make that return trip. After that, 1+ hour commutes in the Bay Area seemed like nuttin'.
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#4
But you actually win cuz I had driven 7x as far for my trip. At your rate, I think it would have taken more like 9 hours.

Advice... consider working swing shift.
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#6
Wow, that's as bad as the worst traffic in Mumbai or Bangalore, man. More than an hour for 16 km is insane traffic.
Yeah, we Americans think we have it bad, but traffic in some densely-populated Asian cities is on a whole 'nother level.

Seattle not as bad as Bay Area or LA yet, but thanks to our city leadership putting every single surface arterial "on a diet" in the last 5 years, we're catching up fast.
 
#7
But you actually win cuz I had driven 7x as far for my trip. At your rate, I think it would have taken more like 9 hours.

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One would think that designers would leave plenty of open space adjacent to the freeway for future lane expansion. But there are congested stretches of 101, such as Mountain View/Palo Alto, with no space to expand lanes. In fact, there is new housing construction within 50 feet of the freeway.

Don't see how the congestion will ever improve without space to expand lanes. I suppose many stretches were built 50-100 years ago when nobody anticipated huge traffic congestion. But poor planning nevertheless.
 
#8
Yeah, we Americans think we have it bad, but traffic in some densely-populated Asian cities is on a whole 'nother level.

Seattle not as bad as Bay Area or LA yet, but thanks to our city leadership putting every single surface arterial "on a diet" in the last 5 years, we're catching up fast.
Somebody made a satirical short film called Silk Board A Love Story about the notorious Silk Board junction bottleneck in Bangalore. In the film, a couple meet, make love and birth a child at a Silk Board traffic jam. All in a day's work.
 
#9
One would think that designers would leave plenty of open space adjacent to the freeway for future lane expansion. But there are congested stretches of 101, such as Mountain View/Palo Alto, with no space to expand lanes. In fact, there is new housing construction within 50 feet of the freeway.

Don't see how the congestion will ever improve without space to expand lanes. I suppose many stretches were built 50-100 years ago when nobody anticipated huge traffic congestion. But poor planning nevertheless.
Here in Seattle, there are 2 North-South freeways running through downtown. One of them was just closed this week... to be replaced by a tunnel with fewer lanes!
 
#10
8.3 MPH. Don't think my vehicle will go that slow unless I keep my foot on the brake. You can walk that fast? I'm impressed. Actually, that's a pretty decent pace for a 10+ mile run.
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#12
This has to be one of the worst commutes in the country. 680 North from Milpitas/San Jose towards Pleasanton.
1 hour 20 minutes to travel 10 miles. That is the normal rush hour commute. There is absolutely no mass transit option.
I think I can walk faster.
:(

Are you a smart tech boy in San Jose ??
 
#13
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Don't see how the congestion will ever improve without space to expand lanes. I suppose many stretches were built 50-100 years ago when nobody anticipated huge traffic congestion. But poor planning nevertheless.
Telecommuting and flying cars (yup, they're here) could alleviate the congestion.

Autonomous vehicles might helps as well. Supposedly, they'll be able to move nearly bumper-to-bumper at high rates of speed... pretty much like they'll be passenger cars of a 'choo-choo' train.

Freeways can expand in the vertical direction. Double-decker freeways. Not unlike the double-decker SF-Oakland Bay Bridge.
 
#14
Worst trafic I have personally been in was in Jakarta during rush hour on a Friday night.
This one time it took about 4 hours to travel about 2-3 km on the freeway. People were WALKING along the freeway next to the cars, selling water and snacks to the drivers more or less parked on the freeway.
 
#15
Worst trafic I have personally been in was in Jakarta during rush hour on a Friday night.
This one time it took about 4 hours to travel about 2-3 km on the freeway. People were WALKING along the freeway next to the cars, selling water and snacks to the drivers more or less parked on the freeway.
I was once stuck for more than half an hour in an absolutely stationary bus in Mumbai. I then did in fact get down, walk about a km in 10-15 min (with NO movement at all of the traffic) and booked a cab and went home by using a shortcut. I have only not got stuck there again because I don't use that route. A metro rail line is under construction there and has blocked the road, so it's going to take a few years.
 
#17
This has to be one of the worst commutes in the country. 680 North from Milpitas/San Jose towards Pleasanton.
1 hour 20 minutes to travel 10 miles. That is the normal rush hour commute. There is absolutely no mass transit option.
I think I can walk faster.
:(

When the Bay Bridge and San Mateo Bridge were too congested, or there were high wind warnings on the bridges, I would sometimes take this route from the East Bay to Stanford. I don't like the Dumbarton route.

I never ran into problems in this section, but avoided peak traffic hours. Is that just after the Sunol Grade when headed south?
 
#18
In L.A., everyone is obsessed with the traffic. Before all the apps and internet discussions, hushed whispers would convey rumors of secret routes to avoid freeway gridlock. Sig-Alert were the most dreaded words.

Sitting at a table at Canter's, it was common for a friend would to look around nervously, and then tell you of an alternative route in a hushed voice. It was like the spy world, or a secret society.

"Listen, before Sunset, get on Sepulveda and take it past LAX." "Venice Boulevard, man, don't take the 10, ride Venice from the 405 all the way west." "Sunset Boulevard is sweet this time of day. Just take it all the way to the PCH."


Waze app directing L.A. drivers to once-hidden streets to avoid 405 Freeway traffic

By ASSOCIATED PRESS
PUBLISHED: December 14, 2014 at 4:49 pm | UPDATED: August 28, 2017 at 7:15 am

When the L.A. residents whose houses hug the narrow warren of streets paralleling the 405 Freeway, the busiest urban freeway in America, began to see bumper-to-bumper traffic crawling by their homes a year or so ago, they were baffled.

When word spread that the explosively popular new smartphone app Waze was sending many of those cars through their neighborhood in a quest to shave five minutes off a daily rush-hour commute, they were angry and ready to fight back.

They would outsmart the app, some said, by using it to report phony car crashes and traffic jams on their streets that would keep the shortcut-seekers away.
Months later, the cars are still there, and the people are still mad.

“The traffic is unbearable now. You can’t even walk your dog,” said Paula Hamilton, who lives on a once-quiet little street in Sherman Oaks.
https://www.dailynews.com/2014/12/1...-hidden-streets-to-avoid-405-freeway-traffic/
 
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#19
Can sometimes take over an hour to travel a mere 500 yards on the street in Vegas where dgold lives; people sometimes stop their cars and will wait 15 or 20 minutes just to see if they can catch a glimpse of the legendary figure.
 
#20
People have known about the Sepulveda route for many years now, even before Waze. It is often pretty clogged during rush hour going to and from the valley.

One of my favorite routes during rush hour going from the south bay to hollywood or the valley (if freeways are clogged) is la cienega blvd -stocker-la brea blvd
 
#21
People have known about the Sepulveda route for many years now, even before Waze. It is often pretty clogged during rush hour going to and from the valley.

One of my favorite routes during rush hour going from the south bay to hollywood or the valley (if freeways are clogged) is la cienega blvd -stocker-la brea blvd
 
#22
When the Bay Bridge and San Mateo Bridge were too congested, or there were high wind warnings on the bridges, I would sometimes take this route from the East Bay to Stanford. I don't like the Dumbarton route.

I never ran into problems in this section, but avoided peak traffic hours. Is that just after the Sunol Grade when headed south?
Yes, Sunol Grade is particularly congested northbound in the evenings (map posted above was 5:00 p.m. conditions). There is no express or car pool lane.

Transportation officials say the one new additional northbound lane (toll lane), to be completed in 2020, will eliminate the congestion. But I doubt one additional lane will be nearly enough.

I don't see how commuters can bear to sit for 1.5 hours to travel just 10 miles on a daily basis. Very stressful.

Located along a 14-mile stretch of southbound I-680 from State Route 84 south of Pleasanton to State Route 237 in Milpitas, the I-680 Sunol Southbound Express Lane has been in operation since September 2010. A northbound express lane along this same corridor broke ground in April 2018 and construction is underway.​
Officials on Thursday broke ground on a new express lane along one of the most congested corridors in the Bay Area: northbound Interstate 680 over the Sunol Grade.​
"Traffic is one of the key issues many people in the valley struggle with," said Fremont Mayor Lily Mei.​
The additional fourth lane will extend roughly nine miles from the Mission Boulevard and Auto Mall Parkway area of Fremont to just north of the Highway 84 exit for Livermore. One transportation official said the extra lane will result in "significant, substantial congestion relief" for the frequently clogged stretch of freeway.​
"The bottlenecks that everybody's seeing from 1 to 8 p.m. today are going to be totally eliminated," Arthur Dao with the Alameda County Transportation Commission said. "What we're trying to do is replicate the effect that we had with the southbound improvement that we did a few years ago.​
When complete, the express lane will act just like the other ones scattered across the Bay Area. Carpoolers and any motorist with a clean air vehicle decal will able to use it free of charge. Solo drivers with a FasTrak tag will also be allowed to use the lane if they are willing to pay a toll. The toll will fluctuate based on timing and demand.​
"It's convenient," commuter Leo Serrano said. "If it gets me out of traffic, I don't mind paying."​
Commuter Robert Malik, on the other hand, is not so fond of the project.​
"I don't think we should have to pay for it," he said. "I think it should be something that just comes along with driving on the freeways. Seems like we already pay for our roads and what not."​
 
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#23
There are just more people and more cars. Last night we drove home from a neighboring town. About 7:30 PM, 18 mile commute, speed limit is 65. It took us 15 minutes to get home and the traffic was really bad. We must’ve seen 12 oncoming cars on the journey.
 
#26
Worst trafic I have personally been in was in Jakarta during rush hour on a Friday night.
This one time it took about 4 hours to travel about 2-3 km on the freeway. People were WALKING along the freeway next to the cars, selling water and snacks to the drivers more or less parked on the freeway.
Yes. I have heard from friends who grew up in Jakarta that the traffic is the stuff of legend.
 
#27
This has to be one of the worst commutes in the country. 680 North from Milpitas/San Jose towards Pleasanton.
1 hour 20 minutes to travel 10 miles. That is the normal rush hour commute. There is absolutely no mass transit option.
I think I can walk faster.
:(

You'd have to walk at 8 minutes per mile and most can't do that. Bicycling is certainly possible.

I'm in New Hampshire and I have a 20 minute commute for 11 miles. I could probably cut 3 minutes by taking a toll road.
 
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