Would you take a higher swing weight, over a higher static weight for the modern ATP FH?

Would you take a higher swing weight, over a higher static weight for the modern ATP FH?


  • Total voters
    55

Tennisanity

Legend
I don't do HH racquets so no. Highest SW that is HL always. Who the hell plays with HH frames anymore??
Well it's all relative isn't it? 1 pt HL is HH relative to 9 pts HL. You can call it anything you like. In other words, higher swing weight always means relatively more HH.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
You would take 10 oz, 362 SW, 15 pts HH, over 12.6 oz, 335 SW, 9 pts HL????
I wouldn't pick either to hit with regularly without customization.

The former could be fixed with weight added in the handle and the latter with a little lead tape at 12 and some weight removed from the handle.
 

Fintft

Legend
I don't do HH racquets so no. Highest SW that is HL always. Who the hell plays with HH frames anymore??
While I agree that no good player plays with a HH frame, if you look at my first post, I switched to a higher SW (but less static weight), which was still HL (or even balanced), but not as HL as my previous frame.

I basically went from 10pts Head Light racquet to another racquet that seems to be Even Balanced/or 6 pts Head Light (as I see it now on another side, but that might be a confusing between the 2016 and the newer, more HL 2017 model).
 
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Attila_the_gorilla

Guest
While I agree that no good player plays with a HH frame.

That's a brave statement. I'd say Carlos Moya was a pretty decent player. A lot of the women also use HH frames. Serena and Venus, for example.
 
2

2HBH-DTL

Guest
95% of good players will use HL frames. That would probably be the best way to put it ;)
 

Fintft

Legend
95% of good players will use HL frames. That would probably be the best way to put it ;)
Thanks, but also, as per the question in this thread: how much HL?

  • E.g. I've moved from 10 points HL to Even Balance/or 3 pts Head Light
  • And increased the SW, while decreasing the static weight at the same time.

BTW, what's up with the differences in measurement for the same racquet: between what says on the frame and what TW site indicates?

E.g. my current frame is listed as either Even Balance, while marked 3 pts Head Light; it seems to be the later, b/c even with an over grip is slightly HL or even ballanced.
 

Simplicius

Semi-Pro
You would take 10 oz, 362 SW, 15 pts HH, over 12.6 oz, 335 SW, 9 pts HL????
Not for tennis use.
Only if I want to nail nails on the wall!
lol

But I also vote for the higher swing weight.
My specs are 8HL, 345g, 350 sw.
So close to vote for a choice, but...
 
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Attila_the_gorilla

Guest
I play mostly doubles where I absolutely need a very short balance. Around 315 mm, not sure how many pts HL that is.
But that setup doesn't work well for singles and I've been lengthening the balance on my singles racket. I want to try lower static weights and longer (more head heavy) balances, to give me better swing speed. Trouble is all my good rackets have silicone in the handle which is a pain to remove, so I need to experiment with some of my less preferred frames.
 

LocNetMonster

Professional
Basically, given decent SW, one would use balance that feels right for his/her game.
This, 100%. The emphasis should be on finding the right racquet characteristics that suits an individual's swing mechanics that helps them achieve the desired level of spin, pace and control.
 

socallefty

Legend
Usually the advice for demoing new racquets is to first pick the highest swingweight range that you can swing comfortably with high racquet head speed (RHS) including on serves. Then, demo different racquets in that range with different static weights, balance, beam thickness, head size etc. and see what feels good. Most of the time it requires an adjustment period of only 10-15 hours to get used to different string patterns, beam width, static weight etc., but it is tough to play well with racquets that have a very different swing weight than what you are used to. You also need to make sure that your racquet has enough stability to withstand the power of your typical opponents without twisting in your hand or feeling too lightweight.

My sweetspot is SW 330-340, weight around 12 ozs and balance around 6-7 pts HL in a 97-98 sq inch racquet with beam thickness less than 22 mm.
 
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3virgul14

Rookie
My racket specs are 364g, 32.50cm, 355sw... so heavy with high swing weight but not really that headlight...

P.S. 20.87 MGR/I

I have the same specs, 364g strung ,32.5cm, 358sw. I'm 1.76 and lean so you don't need to be a body builder to use this stick.

Filled with silicone in the handle, calfskin leather grip and lead under grommets. 9to3

TGK 293.1 prostock prestige. 95 head and quite easy to use. Enormous spin and laser control with tbhs7t strung 22kgs.

Only after 2.5 - 3 hours I feel the weight on serves but I rarely play that long since we don't have best of 5 grandslams around here :)

The dilemma I am facing : I can hit harder with lower powered polys( hawk touch) but then it's more difficult to get out of defensive positions.
 

Fintft

Legend
I have the same specs, 364g strung ,32.5cm, 358sw. I'm 1.76 and lean so you don't need to be a body builder to use this stick.

Filled with silicone in the handle, calfskin leather grip and lead under grommets. 9to3

TGK 293.1 prostock prestige. 95 head and quite easy to use. Enormous spin and laser control with tbhs7t strung 22kgs.

Only after 2.5 - 3 hours I feel the weight on serves but I rarely play that long since we don't have best of 5 grandslams around here :)

The dilemma I am facing : I can hit harder with lower powered polys( hawk touch) but then it's more difficult to get out of defensive positions.
But can you swing it fast enough on the FH? For myself, I have some doubts about my RF97A....
 

mrtimetravel

New User
I have the same specs, 364g strung ,32.5cm, 358sw. I'm 1.76 and lean so you don't need to be a body builder to use this stick.

Filled with silicone in the handle, calfskin leather grip and lead under grommets. 9to3

TGK 293.1 prostock prestige. 95 head and quite easy to use. Enormous spin and laser control with tbhs7t strung 22kgs.

Only after 2.5 - 3 hours I feel the weight on serves but I rarely play that long since we don't have best of 5 grandslams around here :)

The dilemma I am facing : I can hit harder with lower powered polys( hawk touch) but then it's more difficult to get out of defensive positions.
I'm shorter than you... so I agree that you don't need to be a bodybuilder to use specs like these... I actually never get tired playing with my racket... idk I just like it
 

mrtimetravel

New User
But can you swing it fast enough on the FH? For myself, I have some doubts about my RF97A....
When you have specs like that, there is no need in swinging extremely fast. The racquet does all the work for you but that is only if you can get it in front.
 

Fintft

Legend
When you have specs like that, there is no need in swinging extremely fast. The racquet does all the work for you but that is only if you can get it in front.
I'm not sure about that though, as the pros still manage to swing very fast with heavy racquets and we are supposed to play with one as heavy as we can still swing comfortably with....
 

Dragy

Legend
I'm not sure about that though, as the pros still manage to swing very fast with heavy racquets and we are supposed to play with one as heavy as we can still swing comfortably with....
Those guys you ask are possibly flattish hitters, not big-spin fans.
 

3virgul14

Rookie
But can you swing it fast enough on the FH? For myself, I have some doubts about my RF97A....
Those guys you ask are possibly flattish hitters, not big-spin fans.
I almost never hit flat, but have one of the heaviest forehand drives in the town, it is more mechanics IMHO than power. And topspin is a big advantage for controlling your shots.

Some self driven forehands just now:

 

BlueB

Legend
My favourite racquets are typically over 330g and about 320 SW. I max out at 340g and 330 SW.
However, if for some reason the SW is in 340 range, I like the weight to be below 340g.
 

Dragy

Legend
I almost never hit flat, but have one of the heaviest forehand drives in the town, it is more mechanics IMHO than power. And topspin is a big advantage for controlling your shots.

Some self driven forehands just now:

Nice shots. Good you can swing fast with hefty racquet. You likely won’t say it’s not needed to swing fast, and that the racquet does its job at slow speed.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
But can you swing it fast enough on the FH? For myself, I have some doubts about my RF97A....
Trick is to weight it correctly. When you do that you can swing it fast enough. Here is a 422g RF97A and I am an old out of shape dude and I never thought it was too much to swing

 

Fintft

Legend
Trick is to weight it correctly. When you do that you can swing it fast enough. Here is a 422g RF97A and I am an old out of shape dude and I never thought it was too much to swing

Nice!
Although, at first glance, on my tablet, I'm not sure that's enough RHS on the FH (besides it's a short ball).
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
Trick is to weight it correctly. When you do that you can swing it fast enough. Here is a 422g RF97A and I am an old out of shape dude and I never thought it was too much to swing

I'm just thinking about all of the static weight in the sleeve of your sweatshirt.
 

RajS

Semi-Pro
I have been playing around with weighting my rackets to get a bit more power, and I finally got an understanding of how adding weights to the head and handle works! The price I paid to get this understanding was many sets of horrible doubles matches where I kept changing rackets to figure out which one was better... lol! My conclusions follow...

I believe now that swing weight, as it appears in the racket specs, is a number that is a reflection of the feel of the racket to the wrist and forearm and nothing more, for all practical purposes. Adding weight to the head increases the torque the wrist has to apply during a ground stroke, and makes the racket feel heavier to the wrist, since the center of mass (COM) moves out towards the tip of the head. Adding weight to the handle counteracts this torque and makes the racket feel lighter to the wrist, since the COM moves towards the handle, closer to the grip. Head weight makes the racket head naturally move faster relative to the handle - that is, come around faster in a ground stroke or serve - and increases the racket's power, hence the racket will be harder to control (again, because the COM moves closer to the racket head tip). Handle weight slows down the speed with which the head comes around in a ground stroke or serve, and decreases power, but increases control due to less head movement. The more headlight a racket is, the less its power. An overall lighter racket is much easier/quicker to maneuver, since the swing involves the upper arm and shoulder, and the axis of the swing is well outside the racket. Somewhere in between all this is a configuration of weighting that a player will really love, and this is probably different for every player...

I have now chosen to make my rackets more head heavy (even balance), but keep the overall weight low (no handle weight), and work on control... the extra power is really intoxicating to someone getting older and weaker, like me! Of course, I am hoping my Pro Kennex rackets will live up to their billing and protect my hand and shoulder from the abuse to which I am subjecting them.
 
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