Your favourite signature shots of all time

Your favourite signature shots of all time!

  • Agassi return of serve

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Sampras running forehand

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Becker diving volleys

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Connors sky hook

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Sabatini inbetweenie

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Graf forehand (always late on contact but still devastating)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Seles reurn of serve

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Sampras slam dunk

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Henin's one handed backhand

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    1
L

laurie

Guest
Hi. There have been many many players who have brought something different to the game of tennis. Their own way of doing things or shots which are hard to duplicate. With that in mind what's your favourite signature shot of all time. I didn't want to say greatest or best. The word favourite is much more appropriate.

Feel free to add others. The poll only gives me ten choices.

I also can't think of a signature shot for Federer. He has a great all round game but I can't think of a shot unique to him. Federer fans feel free to enlighten me
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
Jimmy Connors groundstrokes, forehand or backhand. They were so distinctive and sadly we'll never see the likes again.
 

LendlFan

Semi-Pro
Jim Courier's - Baseball Bat swinging backhand shot (hard to duplicate)

Andre Agassi's - OTR Forehand (harder than it looks to master)

Pete Sampras's - Jumping overhead smash (Air Sampras)

Steffi Graf's - Backhand Slice

Roger Federer's - Movement (not a shot but certainly part of his arsenal)

Boris Becker's - Down-the-Tee 1st Serve (You know it's coming and you can't do anything about it)

Yannick Noah's - Between the legs shot was better than anybody since

Lindsay Davenport's - Forehand is as good as the men when she plants her feet.
 
L

laurie

Guest
Ah yes!! How can I forget the Courier baseball bat grip! Good call.

I also wanted to include Graf slice backhand but only get 10 choices.

Any more?
 

joe sch

Legend
The Sampras running FH is actually how many of the old champions drived winning groundstrokes. Hard, flat drives. They are beautiful. Federer is one of the players who still has the ability to make similar winners. If most modern fans knew about players like Gonzales, Kramer, Hoad, Vines, Budge and Tilden, you would see some of their names in polls like this. The other 2 dominating winners I like are the Sampras slam dunk overheads and Boris diving volleys, awesome ! I would have surely added Macs drop dead angle volleys to this list !
Those volleys were like slow motion death to most of his opponents :)
 

urban

Legend
Laver's screaming backhand topspin on the run, Rosewall's slight underspin backhand and McEnroe's forehand volley stop with loose grip.
 

fantom

Hall of Fame
I voted for Sampras' running FH. I loved the way he'd camp out on the ad side of the court just daring his opponent to try to hit a winner into the duece court. As soon as they tried, he'd take off in a flash and punish the ball. He never over-ran or under-ran the ball. His timing and accuracy were flawless. His consistency was unbelievable for how hard and flat he hit that thing.....
 

Craig Sheppard

Hall of Fame
Don't forget about Federer's airborne backhand smash! He's just sick he's so good at that--hardest shot in tennis supposedly, he makes it look easy.
 

joe sch

Legend
urban said:
Laver's screaming backhand topspin on the run, Rosewall's slight underspin backhand and McEnroe's forehand volley stop with loose grip.
Yep, Laver & Rosewall should be included with the Gonzales, Kramer, Hoad, Vines, Budge and Tilden gang :)
 

AAAA

Hall of Fame
joe sch said:
The Sampras running FH is actually how many of the old champions drived winning groundstrokes. Hard, flat drives. They are beautiful. Federer is one of the players who still has the ability to make similar winners. If most modern fans knew about players like Gonzales, Kramer, Hoad, Vines, Budge and Tilden, you would see some of their names in polls like this.
I believed his fans and thought Sampras invented the running forehand. Damn another Sampras myth debunked.
 

Matthew

Professional
Craig Sheppard said:
Don't forget about Federer's airborne backhand smash! He's just sick he's so good at that--hardest shot in tennis supposedly, he makes it look easy.
I forgot about that one. Probably the coolest looking shot too. You think Federer is getting ready to lobbed our caught out of position at the net and BAM, he leaps up and slams it down. "The Flicka".
 

AAAA

Hall of Fame
Matthew said:
I forgot about that one. Probably the coolest looking shot too. You think Federer is getting ready to lobbed our caught out of position at the net and BAM, he leaps up and slams it down. "The Flicka".
Rafter had a good backhand smash as well.
 

Tenny

Professional
There are too many.
Edberg's Kick serve
Mac's Screwdriver lefty Serve to ad side of the court
 
Matthew said:
I forgot about that one. Probably the coolest looking shot too. You think Federer is getting ready to lobbed our caught out of position at the net and BAM, he leaps up and slams it down. "The Flicka".
Don't forget about the Federer short low ball scissor kick forhand. Heard courier talking about how he is the only one on the tour that does this shot. Pete used to do a variation of this shot but Feds is more effective.
 

AAAA

Hall of Fame
I liked Michael Stich's serve. Something like 120+ mph serves without jumping off the ground and with a service motion that looked like his prematch stretch of his hitting arm.
 

s_andrean

Semi-Pro
I think Federer does sort of have a signature shot. Watch him run around his backhand on a second serve, he seems to climb an 'invisible staircase' (to quote tv commentators when in his doubles match against GB) and just slaps an unstoppable forehand.

Also not forgetting the unchanged 'cool as ice' face ;)
 

35ft6

Legend
What about Rios' jumping scissor kick backhand?

Gasquet's running backhand down the line. Federer's short angle forehand crosscourt.
 

Rodzilla

Semi-Pro
While we're adding, why not Clijster's split squash shot and Roddick's hands-up-together approach serve?
 

Matthew

Professional
Rafael's running backhand bunts. Incredible stuff there.

Roddick has a nice "slam dunk" as well. Afterall, he was a basketball player.
 

Tenny

Professional
AAAA said:
I liked Michael Stich's serve. Something like 120+ mph serves without jumping off the ground and with a service motion that looked like his prematch stretch of his hitting arm.
although I agree his motion is very efficient and effortless, I don't think his serve motion is one of the best as some others suggested. Very classic looking motion though.
 

finesse15

New User
Federer's backhand overhead is a classic. So smooth and effortless on what is essentially a difficult shot.
 

fedex27

Professional
i voted sampras overhead but i would vote for federer's on the run bh crosscourt angle passing shot
 
I think the Safin swinging volley is unique. It is difficult to explain in words, but I suggest watching this year's AO semifinal against Federer. Safin put on a display of his improvisation.
 

!Tym

Hall of Fame
For me, it's both of Bruguera's groundies. He had the wristiest, most ideosyncratic forehand technique in history in my opinion. There have been lots of big western forehands over the years, but they ALL use that generic windshield wiper technique, except for Bruguera.
For me personally, I like seeing self-choreographed technique, the kind that cannot be taught. And to me Bruguera's groundies exemplified that.

I just think his forehand in particular, it was like a marvel of egineering, the eigth world wonder to me, that he was able to pull that contortionist style technique off against pro level pace...on a scale of one to ten, I'd give it a 14+ in terms of how difficult I think it is to try and copy this stroke.

Also, his backhand was also entirely unique. Most backhands have that generic straight take back technique. Rios did too, it's honestly techinquely no more unique than say Kiefer's backhand. BUT Rios was just a naturally stylish guy, like on So You Think You Can Dance, they always say about how some of the dancers, they're just naturally "cool." That's just how Rios was, a James Dean type who didn't need to say much because the mere stare alone was enough, he was the pasa doble of tennis, the bull fighter, the cape, the glare, the snarl said enough...BUT his actual technique on the backhand was textbook, honestly not that unusual, it's just that Rios had his way of sweeping his cape that made it look just a little hotter than the rest...even though it's still just pulling a cape.

Bruguera's backhand, however, I admired because to me no one else has ever hit it like him, he invented his own technique...it wasn't merely a stylich but still textbook technique. As Cliff Drysdale once said, "Do you see how he takes the racket back, with the wrist cocked? It's a unique shot Patrick, it's a unique shot." Exactly. No one has ever used that stylish, regal BOX beam take back, not unlike his RD-7, preparation on a two-hander before to my knowledge. To me, he actually hit it with the same technique as a one-handed backhand, only with a second hand glued along for the ride. His technique was unique in that he prepared with a traditional, one-hander's closed, sideways, stance, and stayed that way through the contact point, again like a one-hander. Agassi in contrast, in particular, for example has more of a semi-open backhand stance preparation.

The thing is, this box beam take back actually adds nothing to the shot. It's just a unique ideosycrasity. In fact, if anything, I would argue that it actually HURTS the stroke in my opinion, robbing one of valuable time, and introducing a hitch in the motion. Nevertheless, his backhand was known as one of the best on tour per Peter Burwash ("one of the most versatile backhands in the game").

I noticed, however, that on the seniors tour and in the last match I have of him against Federer, he was no longer using the trademark box beam preparation nearly as much. He used to do it on virtually every ball which I always found remarkable, because having tried to copy that technique for years with much difficulty (put it this way, I found picking up a one-handed backhand as a life long two-hander much easier and more natural), I realize it really does rob you of time and requires more timing and EARLIER preparation. If you lose a step with this kind of technique, you're in trouble.

The thing is when I saw him play Federer, he was MUCH slower than in his prime, just coming off surgery, and moving with nowhere near the same confidence or anticipating nearly as well. He simply didn't get in position in enough time to take that unique take back anymore. Against Courier on the Seniors tour it was the same thing. He actually goes to the box beam take back only occasionally now when he has a plenty of time, otherwise he's simplified the stroke and now hits it more traditionally, i.e. the same ol' boring straight take back you see from every two-hander from Clijsters to Pierce to Capriati to Kiefer to Martin to Malivai Washington to Medvedev to etc., etc., ad nauseum, infinity. I must say I'm really dissapointed about this development. I liked Bruguera so much because I thought his technique was so unique and difficult to copy, time, and execute. Now that I see he's taken the easy way out on his backhand technique, by incorporating the simpler, less stylish but more efficient, straight take back swing; it's sad, because what made him unique is no longer there. It's like telling Sampras he can't lift his toe up before swinging on the serve, telling Becker there's a new "rocker rule," i.e. you can only rock back and forth two times before serving before the ref blows the whistle and the ball girls get to throw one ball at your private parts.

A little graphic, but you get what I mean. I like ideosyncratic strokes that I feel no one else on the planet can emulate or copy...ideosyncrasies that I think would make it FAR more difficult for the average person trying to hit these strokes to copy, but for whatever unknown reason it just seems to work for this particular pro only and no one else in the world.

To me, there's a few other "signature" strokes that belong on this list besides Bruguera's groundies, in no particular order.

1) Guy Forget with his hanging hind leg, grasshopper serve.
2) Edberg and the twitch your head to the side and look GQ for the cameras before you swing service motion.
3) The Becker rocker dropper (short for "rock 'em, drop 'em, SOCK 'em") service motion.
4) The Sampras raised toe, pigeon does what pigeon wants, service motion.
5) The McEnroe right angle triangle service motion.
6) The Bersategui Hawaain, "pinata" grip.
7) The Courier "Buff Bagwell" baseball backhand and pure MUSCLED, my jockstrap's too tight! forehand.
8) The Magnus Gustaffson chain-saw killer in a movie, slap-shot forehand hit with a Randy Johnson fastball meets a fat catcher's mitt type impact.
9) The Wayne Ferreira, the last South African cowboy standing on earth, lasso forehand.
10) The Seles Medussa like, two-headed, snapping pirranhas with a purpose two-handed forehand and backhands.
11) The Chang backdoor escape hatch, floppy wrist take back on the backhand.
12) The Kafelnikov my arms are so stiff they could be mistaken for crow bars forehand and backhands.
13) The Kaarsten Braasch lady bug that's been squashed and is squirming with its wings and eyes bugging out for dear life serve.
14) The Rios, Joey Casual sliding for home plate front foot first serve.
15) The Korda sword fish forehand swooping in for the kill, I also think the Korda condor forehand swooping in for the kill is another good analogy, also the venus flytrap looking for a bologne sandwich also works for me.
16) Am I missing anybody else?
17) Yes, that bisterd dey call me me in French. Pass the mustard.

Finally, as an addendum, I forgot one of my favorite signature (my definition of the term at least) shots of all time. The Goran serve. I've seen several of the newer generation try to copy his motion, and do it pretty good; but to me Goran's hamoc like, see-saw, swaying motion was something indicative of a perfect ocean breeze...so light, airy, and effortless yet so crisp in its impact that you'll not soon forget it...AND it can NEVER truly be recaptured or duplicated ever again, just like Saved by the Bell (there's only one Zach Morris.) It's what we neighbordhood kids around the Tennis Warehouse block call "The Wonder Years." Looking back, sigh, was something of a spiritual journey to watch Goran wind through his serve all those years. He kind of looked like a go kart racer from a Japanese anime movie flashing a Red Von Baron ace airfighter pilot for hire like grin before the start. And then, bam, the gun went off and you were left thinking gee this guy's got the rings of Saturn churning around his head like he's some kind of God who walks on air.

Funny, because I also tried to immitate Goran's serve for the longest time, and I had my good days just like I do with the Bruguera forehand and backhand; but I tell you, it really is a more difficult motion to time in my opinion than the more typical, textbook, Agassi style serve. On that, I kind of just think ok, throw ball up, bend knees, swing. On the Goran motion, you feel like you're performing lyrical dance with a partner you've never seen (call her a very beautiful, beautiful woman not unlike Alyssa Milano) for the very first time...on Star Search, and all the world is holding their breath waiting for either the ace, or more likely...the WHIFF, batter strikes out. Alyssa drops you like you're yesterday's news, and eyes Ed McMahon for a little sumthin'-sumthin'.

The weird thing is that in *almost* every case study listed above, these ideosyncrasies actually were their best or "signature" shots for the above aforementioned very successful pros. I kind of look at it like Minus' wet blanket, it's comforting to know that at least you're comfortable with your wet blanket. Why? Because that just means know one else wants to take it. No sir, that space of the universe is entirely reserved for you. Bombs away and happy million dollar earnings to you.
 

rafael

Rookie
baselinebrawler said:
Don't forget about the Federer short low ball scissor kick forhand. Heard courier talking about how he is the only one on the tour that does this shot. Pete used to do a variation of this shot but Feds is more effective.
JCF has done it before. When I saw it I was like "holy crap that rocked!"
 

sarpmas

Rookie
joe sch said:
The Sampras running FH is actually how many of the old champions drived winning groundstrokes. Hard, flat drives. They are beautiful. Federer is one of the players who still has the ability to make similar winners. If most modern fans knew about players like Gonzales, Kramer, Hoad, Vines, Budge and Tilden, you would see some of their names in polls like this. The other 2 dominating winners I like are the Sampras slam dunk overheads and Boris diving volleys, awesome ! I would have surely added Macs drop dead angle volleys to this list !
Those volleys were like slow motion death to most of his opponents :)
Hey joe sch, that's exactly my pick as well! My order may be a little different, first is Sampras's running fh, second is Becker's diving volleys and third is Sampras's slam dunk overheads.

The beauty of the first two choices is that these two are morale zapping defense into offense shots. The level of difficulty in executing these shots successfully are extremely high. Usually prior to executing these 2 shots, you are already under enormous pressure from your opponent, and a winner for your opponent seems inevitable, but to turn the whole point around with these 2 shots, it's simply awesome!

As for Sampras's slam dunk overheads, I thought the level of difficulty is just a tad lower. This shot is supposed to be a winner. The beauty of this shot is that it encompasses Sampras's athleticism, movement and hand-eye coordination in a single shot. Try running towards the ball, leap high up the ground and attempt an overhead, you'll know what I meant.
 

Northerly

Rookie
I'm amazed no-one has mentioned Hana Mandlikova's serve. It was the most elegant and graceful - and effective - shot ever!
 

teedub

Rookie
Matthew said:
Rafael's running backhand bunts. Incredible stuff there.

Roddick has a nice "slam dunk" as well. Afterall, he was a basketball player.
Roddick's 'slam dunk' smash? I'd have to whole-heartedly disagree. That thing is ugly and inaccurate :)
 
W

williams planet

Guest
wtaplayerz said:
Monica Seles' mindboggling ANGLES!
I agree.

Monica's technique is different from almost every other player. If she hadn't been injured (stabbed), her technique would have become the dominant technique. What she does very different from the other players is she has two-handed strokes (on forehand and backhand). In coaching, we call it 'loading.' She loads her wrists. She squeezes hr hand back against her racket - it's loaded like a catapult - then she relaxes her front hand just whips the racket through. She has almost no racket preparation, but she has tremendous velocity and total disguise.

When you play against Monica, you're invariably caught flat-footed because she gives you no close as to where she's going to go with the ball. It's a very, very deceptive stroke on both sides. She hits angles that are almost geometrically unreasonable.
 

LendlFan

Semi-Pro
!Tym said:
For me, it's both of Bruguera's groundies. He had the wristiest, most ideosyncratic forehand technique in history in my opinion. There have been lots of big western forehands over the years, but they ALL use that generic windshield wiper technique, except for Bruguera.
For me personally, I like seeing self-choreographed technique, the kind that cannot be taught. And to me Bruguera's groundies exemplified that.

I just think his forehand in particular, it was like a marvel of egineering, the eigth world wonder to me, that he was able to pull that contortionist style technique off against pro level pace...on a scale of one to ten, I'd give it a 14+ in terms of how difficult I think it is to try and copy this stroke.

Also, his backhand was also entirely unique. Most backhands have that generic straight take back technique. Rios did too, it's honestly techinquely no more unique than say Kiefer's backhand. BUT Rios was just a naturally stylish guy, like on So You Think You Can Dance, they always say about how some of the dancers, they're just naturally "cool." That's just how Rios was, a James Dean type who didn't need to say much because the mere stare alone was enough, he was the pasa doble of tennis, the bull fighter, the cape, the glare, the snarl said enough...BUT his actual technique on the backhand was textbook, honestly not that unusual, it's just that Rios had his way of sweeping his cape that made it look just a little hotter than the rest...even though it's still just pulling a cape.

Bruguera's backhand, however, I admired because to me no one else has ever hit it like him, he invented his own technique...it wasn't merely a stylich but still textbook technique. As Cliff Drysdale once said, "Do you see how he takes the racket back, with the wrist cocked? It's a unique shot Patrick, it's a unique shot." Exactly. No one has ever used that stylish, regal BOX beam take back, not unlike his RD-7, preparation on a two-hander before to my knowledge. To me, he actually hit it with the same technique as a one-handed backhand, only with a second hand glued along for the ride. His technique was unique in that he prepared with a traditional, one-hander's closed, sideways, stance, and stayed that way through the contact point, again like a one-hander. Agassi in contrast, in particular, for example has more of a semi-open backhand stance preparation.

The thing is, this box beam take back actually adds nothing to the shot. It's just a unique ideosycrasity. In fact, if anything, I would argue that it actually HURTS the stroke in my opinion, robbing one of valuable time, and introducing a hitch in the motion. Nevertheless, his backhand was known as one of the best on tour per Peter Burwash ("one of the most versatile backhands in the game").

I noticed, however, that on the seniors tour and in the last match I have of him against Federer, he was no longer using the trademark box beam preparation nearly as much. He used to do it on virtually every ball which I always found remarkable, because having tried to copy that technique for years with much difficulty (put it this way, I found picking up a one-handed backhand as a life long two-hander much easier and more natural), I realize it really does rob you of time and requires more timing and EARLIER preparation. If you lose a step with this kind of technique, you're in trouble.

The thing is when I saw him play Federer, he was MUCH slower than in his prime, just coming off surgery, and moving with nowhere near the same confidence or anticipating nearly as well. He simply didn't get in position in enough time to take that unique take back anymore. Against Courier on the Seniors tour it was the same thing. He actually goes to the box beam take back only occasionally now when he has a plenty of time, otherwise he's simplified the stroke and now hits it more traditionally, i.e. the same ol' boring straight take back you see from every two-hander from Clijsters to Pierce to Capriati to Kiefer to Martin to Malivai Washington to Medvedev to etc., etc., ad nauseum, infinity. I must say I'm really dissapointed about this development. I liked Bruguera so much because I thought his technique was so unique and difficult to copy, time, and execute. Now that I see he's taken the easy way out on his backhand technique, by incorporating the simpler, less stylish but more efficient, straight take back swing; it's sad, because what made him unique is no longer there. It's like telling Sampras he can't lift his toe up before swinging on the serve, telling Becker there's a new "rocker rule," i.e. you can only rock back and forth two times before serving before the ref blows the whistle and the ball girls get to throw one ball at your private parts.

A little graphic, but you get what I mean. I like ideosyncratic strokes that I feel no one else on the planet can emulate or copy...ideosyncrasies that I think would make it FAR more difficult for the average person trying to hit these strokes to copy, but for whatever unknown reason it just seems to work for this particular pro only and no one else in the world.

To me, there's a few other "signature" strokes that belong on this list besides Bruguera's groundies, in no particular order.

1) Guy Forget with his hanging hind leg, grasshopper serve.
2) Edberg and the twitch your head to the side and look GQ for the cameras before you swing service motion.
3) The Becker rocker dropper (short for "rock 'em, drop 'em, SOCK 'em") service motion.
4) The Sampras raised toe, pigeon does what pigeon wants, service motion.
5) The McEnroe right angle triangle service motion.
6) The Bersategui Hawaain, "pinata" grip.
7) The Courier "Buff Bagwell" baseball backhand and pure MUSCLED, my jockstrap's too tight! forehand.
8) The Magnus Gustaffson chain-saw killer in a movie, slap-shot forehand hit with a Randy Johnson fastball meets a fat catcher's mitt type impact.
9) The Wayne Ferreira, the last South African cowboy standing on earth, lasso forehand.
10) The Seles Medussa like, two-headed, snapping pirranhas with a purpose two-handed forehand and backhands.
11) The Chang backdoor escape hatch, floppy wrist take back on the backhand.
12) The Kafelnikov my arms are so stiff they could be mistaken for crow bars forehand and backhands.
13) The Kaarsten Braasch lady bug that's been squashed and is squirming with its wings and eyes bugging out for dear life serve.
14) The Rios, Joey Casual sliding for home plate front foot first serve.
15) The Korda sword fish forehand swooping in for the kill, I also think the Korda condor forehand swooping in for the kill is another good analogy, also the venus flytrap looking for a bologne sandwich also works for me.
16) Am I missing anybody else?
17) Yes, that bisterd dey call me me in French. Pass the mustard.

Finally, as an addendum, I forgot one of my favorite signature (my definition of the term at least) shots of all time. The Goran serve. I've seen several of the newer generation try to copy his motion, and do it pretty good; but to me Goran's hamoc like, see-saw, swaying motion was something indicative of a perfect ocean breeze...so light, airy, and effortless yet so crisp in its impact that you'll not soon forget it...AND it can NEVER truly be recaptured or duplicated ever again, just like Saved by the Bell (there's only one Zach Morris.) It's what we neighbordhood kids around the Tennis Warehouse block call "The Wonder Years." Looking back, sigh, was something of a spiritual journey to watch Goran wind through his serve all those years. He kind of looked like a go kart racer from a Japanese anime movie flashing a Red Von Baron ace airfighter pilot for hire like grin before the start. And then, bam, the gun went off and you were left thinking gee this guy's got the rings of Saturn churning around his head like he's some kind of God who walks on air.

Funny, because I also tried to immitate Goran's serve for the longest time, and I had my good days just like I do with the Bruguera forehand and backhand; but I tell you, it really is a more difficult motion to time in my opinion than the more typical, textbook, Agassi style serve. On that, I kind of just think ok, throw ball up, bend knees, swing. On the Goran motion, you feel like you're performing lyrical dance with a partner you've never seen (call her a very beautiful, beautiful woman not unlike Alyssa Milano) for the very first time...on Star Search, and all the world is holding their breath waiting for either the ace, or more likely...the WHIFF, batter strikes out. Alyssa drops you like you're yesterday's news, and eyes Ed McMahon for a little sumthin'-sumthin'.

The weird thing is that in *almost* every case study listed above, these ideosyncrasies actually were their best or "signature" shots for the above aforementioned very successful pros. I kind of look at it like Minus' wet blanket, it's comforting to know that at least you're comfortable with your wet blanket. Why? Because that just means know one else wants to take it. No sir, that space of the universe is entirely reserved for you. Bombs away and happy million dollar earnings to you.

Other than your exquisite style of (I Be Lovin Adjectives) writing which is enjoyable, I was think you covered just about all except Jay Berger.
Do you remember anything unique about his style?
 

Colpo

Professional
Edberg's backhand volley: Struck so perfectly, it might've broken a baseball bat off the bounce

Becker's kick 2nd serve: The game's best at age 17

Mac's running forehand: Back when Sampras was still collecting dollar bills from the Tooth Fairy

Lendl's scalp collecting: I beg you to approach the net on me ... please

Gasquet's backhand: Not a "signature" just yet, but give the kid 5 years

Borg's baseline game: There's the Bolshevik revolution, then there's the Cuban revolution, and then there's the Borg revolution - everything else is just chatter
 

Grimjack

Banned
Many had a hand in "inventing" the running-forehand-as-weapon. Pete certainly improved upon what the old-timers created, and crafted a remarkable weapon out of it.

But Lendl perfected that shot.
 

LendlFan

Semi-Pro
Grimjack said:
Many had a hand in "inventing" the running-forehand-as-weapon. Pete certainly improved upon what the old-timers created, and crafted a remarkable weapon out of it.

But Lendl perfected that shot.
I thought about Ivan's running forehand and almost included it (thank you) but I believe Pete's shot was on another level and I'd have to give the nod to him on that shot.

Ivan was very good at drawing a winner from a defensive posture but Pete would hang way in the Add Corner and bait his opponent to go wide to the Deuce corner and regardless of what corner you covered, he would find the winner. His speicalty was his cross court winners but Pete's shots were to mid-deuce side where there was no way you could get there.
 

Assassin

New User
Agassi takes it for me, despite the great group he is mentioned with. Agassi invented the return of serve IMO. No matter what type of serve, he stands in close, takes it early with those great eyes of his, and punishes it. I've never seen anyone do it better. Great example for students of the game!
 

Grimjack

Banned
LendlFan said:
I thought about Ivan's running forehand and almost included it (thank you) but I believe Pete's shot was on another level and I'd have to give the nod to him on that shot.

Ivan was very good at drawing a winner from a defensive posture but Pete would hang way in the Add Corner and bait his opponent to go wide to the Deuce corner and regardless of what corner you covered, he would find the winner. His speicalty was his cross court winners but Pete's shots were to mid-deuce side where there was no way you could get there.
I disagree, and I don't think it's even that close. The shots themselves were very similar, with the possible exceptions of the facts that Pete nailed a few more winners (very few), and Lendl's was more consistent (quite a bit). But just judging by the overall SIZE of the shots, you've got to give a huge edge to Lendl. Both were huge, but Pete's was huge in an era when everybody was banging huge FH's. Lendl's was bigger than his contemporaries' by an order of magnitude. Relative to his time, the Lendl FH might be the biggest shot in history. And the runner was his bread and butter.
 
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laurie

Guest
Grimjack and Lendl fan. Can I remind you that I said what was your favourite shot? Not what was the best or greater shot because that would start unneccesary arguments.

Thats nice of you Lendlfan to have that name but still give props to Pete's running forehand.
 

LendlFan

Semi-Pro
laurie said:
Grimjack and Lendl fan. Can I remind you that I said what was your favourite shot? Not what was the best or greater shot because that would start unneccesary arguments.

Thats nice of you Lendlfan to have that name but still give props to Pete's running forehand.
I became a true fan of Tennis during Ivan Lendl's coming of age. he was a workhorse greatly criticized for his demeanor and seeming coldness on court. Yet I was fotunate enough to see that this guy took his job seriously and actually had a great sense of humor which apparently went un-noticed. Ivan's ability to remain in the Top Level of this sport and hold onto the #1 spot for such a long period against the greatness of Becker. Wilander, Edberg, McEnroe and Connors spoke volumes of what he was able to achieve which many seem to forget. Most people who would probably sing his praises often include in such staements, "But he never won Wimbledon" which drives me nuts. Countlss others before & after have not won Wimbledon yet Ivan's record at Wimbledon, I'd take in a heart beat.

Ivan Lendl & Andre Agassi are my hands down favorite male Players and although neither are ever mentioned in conversations regarding the GOAT, I personally put them up there on that list.
 
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