Your favourite TV shows?

Poisoned Slice

Bionic Poster
The final season of Power has been excellent. Making use of every minute in the first five episodes. Big things going down. Still kinda rooting for Ghost. haha
 

NonP

Hall of Fame
Since most of the few TV shows I follow(ed) happened (or not) to be Emmy nominees Sunday nite and I'd already bloviated about some of 'em in a group convo about a month ago (and also because I just created a new thread about the perennial question of cinema vs. TV) I figured I'd combine all my capsule reviews here, with a couple new additions.

I was initially somewhat intrigued by The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel when the title heroine refused to run back to her hubby Joel after he unceremoniously dumped her in the very first episode to placate his fragile male ego, but that's the only time the series showed a hint of the original course it could have taken. The show came at the right place at the right time: on Amazon's burgeoning Prime when "peak TV" was all the rage and streaming was being heralded as the wave of the future, before Amazon was turning record profits and began attracting more scrutiny for its questionable business practices, and, of course, when #MeToo was about to become the cultural force and rallying cry it is today. And whatever "representation" it purports to bring to the masses rings ultimately hollow when you realize that the show is decidedly geared towards the upper-middle-class professionals who, like its heroine, can afford to try their hand at a new career without having to worry about a fallback option. A competent escapist fantasy dressed up in feminist garb might have stood out a decade or two ago, but not in this era of Netflix, Prime, Hulu and other streaming services overflowing with superior options.

The final season of Orange Is the New Black was indeed one of its better ones in years and I especially liked Natalie "Fig" Figueroa (babe Alysia Reiner)'s transformation from a comically corrupt villain into a sympathetic partner of Joe Caputo (who undergoes a notable transformation of his own). So why does it still feel like a PC summer camp jammed into 13 episodes even though its willingness to tackle politically volatile issues (the migrant crisis at the US-Mexico border this time) was there from the very beginning? Perhaps because the show for all its daring and frankness is centered around the life of an upper-middle-class white woman who by the end clearly has it better than any of her former fellow prisoners, but I say more because there's nothing remotely compelling about any of the characters that you haven't seen in countless other stories with the substituted identities of their own cast. Both Maisel and OITNB have been lauded for their exploration of women's sexuality and identity, and rightly so, but try to look in either series for a smidgen of the complex interplay between female (self-)empowerment and female narcissism found in Cukor's best films, let alone an originality of the same order that renders Great Expectations' Iago-like Estella incapable of love except in its most fleetingly maternalistic incarnation. And speaking of which OITNB's admittedly genuine concern for the less fortunate among us is still child's play compared to that of Dickens, who had a more profound understanding than any other artist except perhaps Chaplin of what it means to be poor.

The one recent TV series (and play) that did show an understanding of how girl power can not only coexist but thrive with narcissism is Phoebe Waller-Bridge's Fleabag, which seems to be the year's critical darling and given the lackluster reviews for Veep's final season (here I must add the caveat that apart from GoT I've yet to see any of this year's Emmy nominees except the ones critiqued in this post which exclude Veep) probably the deserving Emmy winner in the top comedy categories. But the comparison with Cukor again works to his competitor's disadvantage as PWB is all too content to direct her ire at trendy boogeymen (egocentric masculinity, neoliberal capitalism and Catholic sexuality, to name just three) while the true master manages to cut deeper and through the ideological BS in one (iconic) scene:


(Much as I liked Gaga in the A Star Is Born, she's no match for Judy as only one of the two knows instinctively what it's like to be constantly looking over her shoulder.)

And I've already discussed how PWB's brand of nihilistic comedy tempered with irreverent humor and asides takes a back seat to Howard Hawks'. Call me a spoilsport or what you will but maybe peak TV has a bit of catching up to do with classical Hollywood?

Better Call Saul isn't as compulsively watchable as Breaking Bad but morally and narratively more intelligent. When Bob Odenkirk recently enthused about the "shattering" fifth season I hope that's not a sign of the old sensational ways to come. Jimmy McGill's slow descent into the Saul Goodman persona and all that represents is one of the great character studies in TV history and may well end up upstaging Walter White's own decline and fall from grace.

I'm rather hesitant to comment on The Handmaid's Tale before finishing Atwood's latest The Testaments which reportedly incorporates several storylines that have been introduced in the TV series. Suffice it to say for now that the show's endless parade of female oppression and subjugation followed by occasional F-U triumphs is wearing thin and I'm not a fan of June (played by usually reliable Elisabeth Moss)'s equally monochrome projection of simmering female rage that fails to register when the situation calls for more nuanced responses. The countervailing force has been Bradley Whitford's Commander Joseph Lawrence who plays an outsize role in more ways than one and who I hope will return for season 4 and beyond.

Stranger Things is fun while it lasts and season 3 delivered on that score, but while I understand the new evil-Russians angle isn't without a historical basis I found it gratuious (and arguably irresponsible, given the renewed Red Scare of late thanks to you-know-who) as well as an awkward attempt at social relevance when it's clear this is little more than an extended sci-fi romp through the '80s. And I know I'm not alone in thinking the show could use less Demogorgon.
 

acintya

Legend
Television just seems to be getting worse. There are more shows than ever but practically nothing I care to watch.
you can say that for every topic you pick.
too much of everything, diamonds get lost in dirt and ****. ok,ocassionaly some light pops out but not for long.
 

Poisoned Slice

Bionic Poster
My mate finally talked me into watching Suits. Now I'm wondering why I never gave it a go before. My mate sees a bit of Harvey in himself. haha I really enjoyed the first episode. Looks like good stuff.
 

Vcore89

G.O.A.T.
My mate finally talked me into watching Suits. Now I'm wondering why I never gave it a go before. My mate sees a bit of Harvey in himself. haha I really enjoyed the first episode. Looks like good stuff.
Must-see tv though it fell off the cliff somewhere down the road. You're gonna love to hate Daniel Hardman of Pearson Hardman [before it became Pearson, Specter Litt; Litt; Wheeler, Williams & Bennett]. You won't miss Wendy Rhoades when you've got a Donna Paulsen.
 

MichaelNadal

Bionic Poster
Been watching Xena a lot lately again, and I dream of Jeannie...... new season of American Horror Story, New (and final season) of HTGAWM, and midway through Smallville season 6
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
@Vcore89
My mate finally talked me into watching Suits. Now I'm wondering why I never gave it a go before. My mate sees a bit of Harvey in himself. haha I really enjoyed the first episode. Looks like good stuff.
Outstanding show. However, it's been a while since I've seen it. Watched most of the 1st 2 seasons and part of season 3 before I lost access to the USA Network. Initially, a lot of the show centered around Mike and Harvey. Louis was the guy you loved to hate. Paralegal, Rachel (Duchess of Sussex), was always a treat to watch. As was Donna and Jessica.

A buddy of mine says he really enjoyed the 6 seasons but has not kept up after that. Heard that season 7 was also decent but don't know anyone who's seen more recent eps.

I've not had a chance to see Katherine Heigl in the last seasons. Enjoyed her characters in Roswell, Greys Anatomy and a number of her movies. Hoping she's ok in this cuz I've not seen her acting in a while.
 

Vcore89

G.O.A.T.
Look forward to seeing Daniel Hardman. :cool:

Harvey really is next level.

''I take great pride in my work.''

Speaking of loving to hate, I;m loving to hate this guy right now. haha He is quality banter. :D
Just like Titans' ''Eff Batman'', Harvey has got this:

@Vcore89
Outstanding show. However, it's been a while since I've seen it. Watched most of the 1st 2 seasons and part of season 3 before I lost access to the USA Network. Initially, a lot of the show centered around Mike and Harvey. Louis was the guy you loved to hate. Paralegal, Rachel (Duchess of Sussex), was always a treat to watch. As was Donna and Jessica.

A buddy of mine says he really enjoyed the 6 seasons but has not kept up after that. Heard that season 7 was also decent but don't know anyone who's seen more recent eps.

I've not had a chance to see Katherine Heigl in the last seasons. Enjoyed her characters in Roswell, Greys Anatomy and a number of her movies. Hoping she's ok in this cuz I've not seen her acting in a while.
Jessica is now a bit tamed on her own spin-off show, Pearson.

Katherine Heigl [Samantha Wheeler] as a season regular in season 8 was brought in [I believe] to fill in the void left by the ghost of Duchess Meg. And Sam said, “We’ll...always feel like outsiders no matter how much we earn their respect.”
 

Poisoned Slice

Bionic Poster
Louis is my guy in Suits. haha He is hilarious.

On the Smallville season 6 finale now, gonna watch that later before HIAC :)
Just got into Undercover Boss and "My Strange Addiction" this week. Both are a trip

''At last... A Kryptonian... '' No spoilers. I just like that quote from the season 6 finale. :p
 

Azure

Legend
I was initially somewhat intrigued by The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel when the title heroine refused to run back to her hubby Joel after he unceremoniously dumped her in the very first episode to placate his fragile male ego, but that's the only time the series showed a hint of the original course it could have taken.
In watched this one. First two seasons. It started out great and in season 2 the show just reinforced prejudices. The lady runs back into the arms of her jerk of a husband towards the end of the season. This pissed me off completely. The show depicts a seemingly intelligent woman only acting dumb in key moments. I prefer her perky manager more. Season 1 was good...I thought it would get better but season 2 was a disappointment.

Watched a few episodes of House. Once I got through season 1, I lost interest.

I rewatched a few episodes of Fry and Laurie over the last week and this show is still outstanding after all these decades!
 

donquijote

Legend
I became a follower of British crime series after watching the excellent Line of Duty. Right now I'm watching The Fall. It's very good so far after two episodes and Gillian Anderson is still beautiful.
 

Poisoned Slice

Bionic Poster
@Poisoned Slice, the casts of Suits in particular, Ms Paulsen [nobody says no to The Donna] request the honor of your presence in the final season of Mr Queen's odyssey.

Mr Slice [obligingly]: No, not ever!o_O
He's been through some *bleep* in his life. Nice trailer. I might show my face for the opening episode and see how it goes from there. Definitely in for the big event later on.
 

Harry_Wild

G.O.A.T.

Firefly - 2002-2003, a Sci-Fi western drama!

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firefly_(TV_series)


ar. The series is set in the year 2517, after the arrival of humans in a new star system and follows the adventures of the renegade crew of Serenity, a "Firefly-class" spaceship. The ensemble cast portrays the nine characters who live on Serenity. Whedon pitched the show as "nine people looking into the blackness of space and seeing nine different things".[1]


The show explores the lives of a group of people, some of whom fought on the losing side of a civil war, who make a living on the fringes of society as part of the pioneer culture of their star system. In this future, the only two surviving superpowers, the United States and China, fused to form the central federal government, called the Alliance, resulting in the fusion of the two cultures. According to Whedon's vision, "nothing will change in the future: technology will advance, but we will still have the same political, moral, and ethical problems as today".[2]

Firefly premiered in the U.S. on the Fox network on September 20, 2002. By mid-December, Firefly had averaged 4.7 million viewers per episode and was 98th in Nielsen ratings.[3] It was canceled after eleven of the fourteen produced episodes were aired. Despite the relatively short life span of the series, it received strong sales when it was released on DVD and has large fan support campaigns.[4][5] It won a Primetime Emmy Award in 2003 for Outstanding Special Visual Effects for a Series. TV Guide ranked the series at No. 5 on their 2013 list of 60 shows that were "Cancelled Too Soon".[6]

The post-airing success of the show led Whedon and Universal Pictures to produce Serenity, a 2005 film which continues from the story of the series,[4]and the Firefly franchise expanded to other media, including comics and a role-playing game.[7][8]
Firefly premiered in the U.S. on the Fox network on September 20, 2002. By mid-December, Firefly had averaged 4.7 million viewers per episode and was 98th in Nielsen ratings.[3] It was canceled after eleven of the fourteen produced episodes were aired. Despite the relatively short life span of the series, it received strong sales when it was released on DVD and has large fan support campaigns.[4][5] It won a Primetime Emmy Award in 2003 for Outstanding Special Visual Effects for a Series. TV Guide ranked the series at No. 5 on their 2013 list of 60 shows that were "Cancelled Too Soon".[6]

The post-airing success of the show led Whedon and Universal Pictures to produce Serenity, a 2005 film which continues from the story of the series,[4]and the Firefly franchise expanded to other media, including comics and a role-playing game.[7][8]
 

Vcore89

G.O.A.T.
Tried to watch Watchmen [I'll just stick with Pennyworth; even Batwoman and definitely Titans] then I switched to Raising Dion and went to bed.
 
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