YouTube Videos - How To

1012007

Hall of Fame
Hey 1012007 :)
I was gonna get one from W&D Strings, its brand is not stated but it's probably Pro's pro - £14
I'm reluctant to pay so much also...
where are you finding the stringway clamp?
Tennis Tech UK has the Stringway Starting clamp
 

1012007

Hall of Fame
OK that would be great thanks. Will you use it for just tightening knots or for ATW patterns and bridging from frame to tensioner?
 

ls206

Professional
Yea I'll use it for the whole shebang :p
tightening knots, ATW patterns and also to start crosses on hybrid jobs. Oh and for tensioning, yes.
The problem with cheaper stuff is longevity, which I won't be able to determine, d'oh
 

1012007

Hall of Fame
Yeah but as it's Pro's Pro, i would guess that it wouldnt be good enough to hold the string on ATW patterns etc without losing a load of tension on the string
 

ls206

Professional
I think it's a Pro's pro. To be fair, their stuff isn't all that bad considering the price. I use their overgrips and really like them, they don't last quite as long as the big brands but they cost under 50p!
I'll put the clamp through some "slippage" tests with some 17g smooth syn gut.
 

1012007

Hall of Fame
OK that would be great. Thankyou.

What overgrips do you use? I use gamma supreme which is under 50p each anyway if you get a 30 reel
 

ls206

Professional
pro's pro prestige, quite tacky and fairly absorbent. I change about....every 8-10hrs
how're the gammas?

Do you guys have any tips on cleaning your clamps?
at the moment I just wrap some string in cloth and "floss" the clamp
 

1012007

Hall of Fame
gammas are very nice and last four hours. They are very good at the start and very very slowly deteriate

I just put white spirit on a cloth, then put it in the clamp and tighten the clamp.
 

ls206

Professional
Yea I should probably change mine every 4-5hrs, 8 is pushing it.

I got the clamp today and have been testing it out a bit.
It feel very solid, has 3 springs which are well lubricated.
the clamping surface is slightly textured and there is one set of tensioning holes.
I tied some knots and also tensioned some string.
The clamp only leaves slight marks on the string. (I used tecnifibre syn gut 17) and it grips very well.
I tensioned some string with the clamp at 30kgs and there were no signs of movement or potentially dangerous slippage.
 

ls206

Professional
yea, that's the true test.
It does have 3 springs whereas a lot of the cheap ones only have 2.
but for now, it's very good.

Edit, just used the new clamp to string the UKRSA atw pattern.
I have to say, I really like this pattern, I can actually feel the string bed is nicer....hard to explain.

Next up, the DireDesire pattern, that looks to be very nice too.
 
Last edited:

Dags

Hall of Fame
With the help of these vids I've just strung my first racquet. :) I'm sure you're bored of hearing it by now, but thanks for making them. I think I'd still be trying to figure it out otherwise.

One question I have is regarding mounting the racquet. I have a 6-point mounting system, and followed the advice in your video so the side posts just touched enough so they wouldn't twist back and forth. At least, that's how they were at the start. By the time I got towards the throat on the crosses, I noticed that the posts at that end were a little loose. I guess this is because the string tension had caused the frame to compress slightly.

Should I be checking for this and tighten them as necessary? I don't have anything to tighten under the posts themselves like you do in the video - they just sit freely. The only way I can move them is to use the knobs at the end. In the video you state that they're to stop the frame from moving out rather than to keep it in, so I'm not sure if this is important or not.
 

YULitle

Hall of Fame
With the help of these vids I've just strung my first racquet. :) I'm sure you're bored of hearing it by now, but thanks for making them. I think I'd still be trying to figure it out otherwise.

One question I have is regarding mounting the racquet. I have a 6-point mounting system, and followed the advice in your video so the side posts just touched enough so they wouldn't twist back and forth. At least, that's how they were at the start. By the time I got towards the throat on the crosses, I noticed that the posts at that end were a little loose. I guess this is because the string tension had caused the frame to compress slightly.

Should I be checking for this and tighten them as necessary? I don't have anything to tighten under the posts themselves like you do in the video - they just sit freely. The only way I can move them is to use the knobs at the end. In the video you state that they're to stop the frame from moving out rather than to keep it in, so I'm not sure if this is important or not.
Some people do tighten as they go, making sure that they side supports always touch. I find that if a machine does this on one racquet, it's liable to do it on another, so I add a little more pressure to start.

Also, be sure that your center mounts aren't slipping. If they slip, then the racquet will stretch and give the appearance that your side mounts aren't tight enough.
 

Dags

Hall of Fame
No slipping today, but some light marks on the bumper guard/grommet strip afterwards, suggesting I went a touch too far the other way. Which is worse for the racquet - to be slightly too loose, or too tight?

I also just ordered a Carbon Leaf album based on the excerpt in your Starting Crosses with a Starting Clamp video. Sounded like a nice tune :)
 

YULitle

Hall of Fame
No slipping today, but some light marks on the bumper guard/grommet strip afterwards, suggesting I went a touch too far the other way. Which is worse for the racquet - to be slightly too loose, or too tight?

I also just ordered a Carbon Leaf album based on the excerpt in your Starting Crosses with a Starting Clamp video. Sounded like a nice tune :)
Sweet! They're a great band to hear live too, from what I hear.

I would think that too tight is worse than too loose, but there are certain degrees. There's a point where it being so loose could break the frame almost everytime.
 
Sure, if anyone minds sending me a Klippermate for a while, I'll make some. :D
I'm sure you can ask one of your worshipers to buy you one. :twisted: by the way, I don't think the "stringing mains with flying clamps" is a valid method of stringing. I've tried this twice and the clamp at the throat slipped, unless I'm supposed to clamp it to a dummy string. I find my customized starting pin method works much better.
 

Dags

Hall of Fame
Sweet! They're a great band to hear live too, from what I hear.

I would think that too tight is worse than too loose, but there are certain degrees. There's a point where it being so loose could break the frame almost everytime.
I'll keep an eye out for them if they ever tour the UK (unless I hate the album of course).

Thanks for the advice. Hopefully it won't take too many goes to get it spot on, but I'll err on the side of a touch loose until I hit it.
 

GPB

Professional
I just watched your "starting crosses with starting clamp" video, and I'm curious why you didn't just keep tension on the starting clamp the whole time. What made you tie off before you finish the rest of the crosses?

Thanks -- I just got my SP Swing in the mail, and will try to do my first unsupervised racket stringing tonight!

Edit: and about pre-stretching: since a dropweight is constant-pull, is it advisable to prestretch multi's on this kind of stringer?

Thanks guys!
 
Last edited:

YULitle

Hall of Fame
I just watched your "starting crosses with starting clamp" video, and I'm curious why you didn't just keep tension on the starting clamp the whole time. What made you tie off before you finish the rest of the crosses?

Thanks -- I just got my SP Swing in the mail, and will try to do my first unsupervised racket stringing tonight!

Edit: and about pre-stretching: since a dropweight is constant-pull, is it advisable to prestretch multi's on this kind of stringer?

Thanks guys!
You can leave it on throughout the process. I just remove it so that there is less chance of knocking it off.

Pre-stretching is just a good skill to have. There really isn't a set instance in which pre-stretching is required. It's all determined by user preference. It's like knowing how to tint windows at a oil-change shop. You never would just assume that a car needed their windows tinted just because they were getting their oil changed, but when they ask for it, it's wise to know how to better service them.
 

GPB

Professional
You can leave it on throughout the process. I just remove it so that there is less chance of knocking it off.
Okay, sweet. I went ahead and left it on, tying both my knots one after another. So I did my first 2-piece job last night, on an old PK Graphite Ace (14x18). Using a 40' set of PSGD, there was over 10' left over, lol! Next up will be one of my PSC's (not sure if I'll give it Alpha Gut 2000 or E-Matrix).

Anyways, it took me about 3 tries to start the mains correctly (I have two flying clamps and a starting clamp) but the crosses were a piece of cake. Thanks to everyone in this thread for your help (lots of people read but don't post).

My biggest problem with my stringjob yesterday (after figuring out the mains, of course) was that I cut the tail on a knot too short. I'm afraid it's not gonna last through a hitting session. Oh well, more stringing practice I guess.
 

ls206

Professional
nice one GPB

I find that when cutting the tail off knots, if you place the cutters on the frame of the racquet and cut towards the hoop, the tail is not too short and also doesn't catch on anything that brushes against the frame. (for knots where the tail points away from the hoop)
 

ls206

Professional
:p no probs,
yea the clamp has been present in all my recent string jobs. Only about...5, but it's still working well, it marks multi strings a bit, but I think that is to be expected. it's definitely not as harsh as overtightened clamps.
 

Dags

Hall of Fame
Reading various threads, I've seen that you use the turntable lock on a machine when stringing Prince O3 racquets. This got me thinking: is there any benefit to locking the turntable when stringing a racquet with regular grommets? I was wondering whether it might lead to a more consistent job, as the turntable could not slip at any point. But on the other hand, perhaps it leads to a more inconsistent job unless you get the angle spot on. So I'm not sure now, hence the question. :)
 

YULitle

Hall of Fame
Reading various threads, I've seen that you use the turntable lock on a machine when stringing Prince O3 racquets. This got me thinking: is there any benefit to locking the turntable when stringing a racquet with regular grommets? I was wondering whether it might lead to a more consistent job, as the turntable could not slip at any point. But on the other hand, perhaps it leads to a more inconsistent job unless you get the angle spot on. So I'm not sure now, hence the question. :)
Doing it the same way every time is the surest way to consistency.

However, pulling straight out of a grommet so that the pulled string is parallel to the main/cross it's attached to (inside the racquet) isn't possible without a sliding turntable(or similarly sliding tension head.) The angle the string would turn coming out of the tension head to approximate this would negate any benefits you think you'd gain by attempting this. So, it's best to just let it fly and allow the tension head to turn the racquet freely (but not crazily, of course.) The pulled string should come straight out of the tension head to the racquet, regardless of the angle it turns into the frame.
 

Dags

Hall of Fame
Phew, just read this thread start to finish. You're a patient man, answering the same questions over and over! I notice you were talking about becoming a teacher: from your videos and responses in this thread, I think you'd have an excellent temperament for it.

I have one further query at the moment, which has yet to be posed. :) I've strung one of my Head FXP Prestige MP racquets, which has the CAP grommet system. I did a 2-piece job, and experienced an issue when I got near the end of the crosses: where I tied off the mains, I've blocked a cross hole. This wasn't an issue approaching the grommet from inside the frame where I could cut the end at an angle and wiggle it through, but going from the outside all I could see was the string covering the hole. How do you prepare for that with the CAP system? Because it's such a narrow opening, the only way I could see to get around it was to move the string with an awl. Any special techniques?

Carbon Leaf also arrived, and I'm undecided about it after the first few plays. Believe it or not, this is an extremely good sign: if I dislike an album then I tend just not to listen to it, and if I take to it straight away then I will often get bored with it very quickly. The ones I'm unsure about often turn into growers and become my favourites.
 
Phew, just read this thread start to finish. You're a patient man, answering the same questions over and over! I notice you were talking about becoming a teacher: from your videos and responses in this thread, I think you'd have an excellent temperament for it.

I have one further query at the moment, which has yet to be posed. :) I've strung one of my Head FXP Prestige MP racquets, which has the CAP grommet system. I did a 2-piece job, and experienced an issue when I got near the end of the crosses: where I tied off the mains, I've blocked a cross hole. This wasn't an issue approaching the grommet from inside the frame where I could cut the end at an angle and wiggle it through, but going from the outside all I could see was the string covering the hole. How do you prepare for that with the CAP system? Because it's such a narrow opening, the only way I could see to get around it was to move the string with an awl. Any special techniques?

Carbon Leaf also arrived, and I'm undecided about it after the first few plays. Believe it or not, this is an extremely good sign: if I dislike an album then I tend just not to listen to it, and if I take to it straight away then I will often get bored with it very quickly. The ones I'm unsure about often turn into growers and become my favourites.
flatten the string, cut it at a sharp edge, dip it in lip stick, and clamp it with your pliers and then shove it through the grommet ( at an angle). this should work, but make sure you're holding only the very tip with your pliers, like YuLitle demonstrates. and.. the whole thread? wow!
 

YULitle

Hall of Fame
Phew, just read this thread start to finish. You're a patient man, answering the same questions over and over! I notice you were talking about becoming a teacher: from your videos and responses in this thread, I think you'd have an excellent temperament for it.

I have one further query at the moment, which has yet to be posed. :) I've strung one of my Head FXP Prestige MP racquets, which has the CAP grommet system. I did a 2-piece job, and experienced an issue when I got near the end of the crosses: where I tied off the mains, I've blocked a cross hole. This wasn't an issue approaching the grommet from inside the frame where I could cut the end at an angle and wiggle it through, but going from the outside all I could see was the string covering the hole. How do you prepare for that with the CAP system? Because it's such a narrow opening, the only way I could see to get around it was to move the string with an awl. Any special techniques?

Carbon Leaf also arrived, and I'm undecided about it after the first few plays. Believe it or not, this is an extremely good sign: if I dislike an album then I tend just not to listen to it, and if I take to it straight away then I will often get bored with it very quickly. The ones I'm unsure about often turn into growers and become my favourites.
Yeah, Carbon Leaf has a couple albums. I have two. I definitely prefer one over the other.

About the Cap grommets. If I have to string two piece, and the cross is a multifilament, I will try as best as I can to push it through using the method in my video. If that doesn't work, after many tries, I will end up using an AWL. :(

Thanks for reading through the thread first. :D
 

Dags

Hall of Fame
flatten the string, cut it at a sharp edge, dip it in lip stick, and clamp it with your pliers and then shove it through the grommet ( at an angle). this should work, but make sure you're holding only the very tip with your pliers, like YuLitle demonstrates. and.. the whole thread? wow!
Does it matter what colour lipstick? ;) I've seen reference to chapstick or lip balm in this thread: did you mean that, or do you really mean lipstick?

The issue have with the CAP system is that there doesn't seem to be any room to work in. I can go through your checklist right up to 'shove it through the grommet (at an angle)' - because of the narrow opening and distance to the grommet, I was unable to create an angle.

I thought someone should read the whole thread. I was looking to see if there were any golden nuggets I could glean. That and putting off searching the net for cheaper house insurance.
 
woops, i meant chapstick. sorry ;]. If that doesn't work, than you have yourself in quite a deep pool of water, my friend. I don't know any alternatives except buying a pathfinder guiding awl. I don't even use it myself, because I've never experienced the need to use this. but.... if you're willing to shell out the money, I think this item would work.
http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/descpage-PATHAWL.html

I'm pretty sure YULitle has a video demonstrating how to use this confangled contraption :)
 

Dags

Hall of Fame
Yeah, Carbon Leaf has a couple albums. I have two. I definitely prefer one over the other.

About the Cap grommets. If I have to string two piece, and the cross is a multifilament, I will try as best as I can to push it through using the method in my video. If that doesn't work, after many tries, I will end up using an AWL. :(

Thanks for reading through the thread first. :D
Which do you prefer? I opted for Love, Loss, Hope, Repeat, as it has Under the Wire on it, and that's what was prompting me to buy their music.

I'll re-check your video and the methods tennisfreak mentions above for the grommets. The string moved extremely easily with the awl (surprisingly so, in fact), but it's heartache waiting to happen. I might try to prevent it from blocking the hole in the first place... maybe stick a scrap piece of string through the grommet before I tie off the main or something...
 

Dags

Hall of Fame
woops, i meant chapstick. sorry ;]. If that doesn't work, than you have yourself in quite a deep pool of water, my friend. I don't know any alternatives except buying a pathfinder guiding awl. I don't even use it myself, because I've never experienced the need to use this. but.... if you're willing to shell out the money, I think this item would work.
http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/descpage-PATHAWL.html

I'm pretty sure YULitle has a video demonstrating how to use this confangled contraption :)
He does have a video. I might consider it if I continue to have problems, but I'm not sure if it's much better than just moving the string out of the way with a regular awl.
 
to YULitle or anyone who has tried stringing a Microgel Radical MP with an ATW pattern, it won't harm the racquet, correct? I keep hearing around the forums that the radical has a soft substance in the head that makes it more prone to deformation. I just need to verify that it will not damage the frame on an ATW pattern, since I am horrible at 2-piece stringing.
 

YULitle

Hall of Fame
to YULitle or anyone who has tried stringing a Microgel Radical MP with an ATW pattern, it won't harm the racquet, correct? I keep hearing around the forums that the radical has a soft substance in the head that makes it more prone to deformation. I just need to verify that it will not damage the frame on an ATW pattern, since I am horrible at 2-piece stringing.
The ATW is much better than down-up cross installation, especially on the Radical. The only thing "better," and it's certainly arguable, is two-piece.
 
The ATW is much better than down-up cross installation, especially on the Radical. The only thing "better," and it's certainly arguable, is two-piece.
okay, thanks. ATW pattern it is. I'll start trying 2-piece as soon as I get a starting clamp to tighten knots. needle nosed pliers always seems to break the string... and my face. :|
 

Dags

Hall of Fame
An update from last night: the piece of scrap string in the grommet didn't work (whose idea was that, eh?) as it prevented the main from entering the CAP on tie off. However, this time it only partially blocked the cross grommet, so I was able to complete the job awl free. Hurrah!

Of course, another string job means more questions arising. ;-)

Question 1: I revisited the parnell knot video to remind myself how to do it, and realised that I hadn't been following it properly first time round. I made the mistake because I was following what you said, rather than what you did. The first hitch is fine - Over, Under, Through. On the video, you then say to go under and through again, whereas what you actually do is go Over, then under and through. So my knot from last week was actually a variation that went like this:

(Starting as in your video with the anchor string on the right, and the tie-off on the left):

Over, L-R. Under, R-L. Through. Under, L-R. Through the loop on the right side of the anchor.

Having tied with a proper parnell last night, I actually think this alternate method results in a neater knot. Is it an accepted variation? The only issue I could see is that it is slightly smaller, but I've been hitting with that racquet all week and had no problems.

Question 2: I haven't quite identified what a hard weave is yet. Once the first couple of crosses are in, they all look hard to me! Would there be anything technically wrong with pulling twice on every cross (other than obviously taking longer)?

Question 3: Having had success with my syn gut jobs, I tried a multi last night. The string in question was NXT Tour, a pretty clear-coloured string. When it was held (both in the clamps and tension head), white marks were made on the string where it had been gripped. I spent about half and hour at the start adjusting the clamps, but found that if they were loose enough not to make a mark, then they wouldn't hold tension. No damage has been done (at least, as far as I can tell), but they look pretty rubbish in the racquet now with white marks all over them. Is this normal? Or is it down to poor technique on my part?

Thanks for reading!
 

YULitle

Hall of Fame
An update from last night: the piece of scrap string in the grommet didn't work (whose idea was that, eh?) as it prevented the main from entering the CAP on tie off. However, this time it only partially blocked the cross grommet, so I was able to complete the job awl free. Hurrah!

Of course, another string job means more questions arising. ;-)

Question 1: I revisited the parnell knot video to remind myself how to do it, and realised that I hadn't been following it properly first time round. I made the mistake because I was following what you said, rather than what you did. The first hitch is fine - Over, Under, Through. On the video, you then say to go under and through again, whereas what you actually do is go Over, then under and through. So my knot from last week was actually a variation that went like this:

(Starting as in your video with the anchor string on the right, and the tie-off on the left):

Over, L-R. Under, R-L. Through. Under, L-R. Through the loop on the right side of the anchor.

Having tied with a proper parnell last night, I actually think this alternate method results in a neater knot. Is it an accepted variation? The only issue I could see is that it is slightly smaller, but I've been hitting with that racquet all week and had no problems.

Question 2: I haven't quite identified what a hard weave is yet. Once the first couple of crosses are in, they all look hard to me! Would there be anything technically wrong with pulling twice on every cross (other than obviously taking longer)?

Question 3: Having had success with my syn gut jobs, I tried a multi last night. The string in question was NXT Tour, a pretty clear-coloured string. When it was held (both in the clamps and tension head), white marks were made on the string where it had been gripped. I spent about half and hour at the start adjusting the clamps, but found that if they were loose enough not to make a mark, then they wouldn't hold tension. No damage has been done (at least, as far as I can tell), but they look pretty rubbish in the racquet now with white marks all over them. Is this normal? Or is it down to poor technique on my part?

Thanks for reading!
1) Not sure what you are saying exactly, but so long as it's tied like the video shows, you'll be fine.

2)Hopefully this helps.

And technically, there is nothing "wrong" with pulling all crosses twice, just so long as you do it all the time.

3) The "ghosting," as it's called, is normal (especially with NXT.) Don't worry about it unless it is leaving physical indentations. It's better to have a little ghosting than having the string slip through the clamps.
 

GPB

Professional
Yeah, I ghosted my E-Matrix and Wilson Supreme when I strung them. At the time the strings were indented a little, but now (after a day) they're fine. Should I be more careful in the future, or does this sound fine?

Edit: oh yeah, my real question! The pattern to my PSC 95 says to tie off on the 13T, which is a cross. I strung both of my rackets this way (with a 2-piece). Is this acceptable? Thanks guys!
 

YULitle

Hall of Fame
Yeah, I ghosted my E-Matrix and Wilson Supreme when I strung them. At the time the strings were indented a little, but now (after a day) they're fine. Should I be more careful in the future, or does this sound fine?

Edit: oh yeah, my real question! The pattern to my PSC 95 says to tie off on the 13T, which is a cross. I strung both of my rackets this way (with a 2-piece). Is this acceptable? Thanks guys!
Yes, tying off on a cross is fine.
 
Top