YouTube Videos - How To

1) Not sure what you are saying exactly, but so long as it's tied like the video shows, you'll be fine.
Seems I didn't explain myself too well. I tied a knot that did not match the video (and none of your other knot videos), but rather liked it. I suppose the question was whether the knot I tied would be approved. Are there any other knots that you haven't included in your videos? Or a 'big book of knots'? I appreciate that for my own racquets I can literally do whatever I like, but I'd rather be consistent and use authorised techniques so I don't get into bad habits when stringing for others.

2)Hopefully this helps.
Helps no end, thanks!

3) The "ghosting," as it's called, is normal (especially with NXT.) Don't worry about it unless it is leaving physical indentations. It's better to have a little ghosting than having the string slip through the clamps.
Thanks for clarification, it's reassuring to know that it wasn't an error. I may end up with a love-hate relationship with NXT: I hate the way it looks with the ghosting, it costs a lot, and it's the first string that has made a 'pinging' sound when I hit the ball (I don't use a dampner). But I found it really comfortable with a lot of feel, damn it!
 
N

NadalFan1990

Guest
YULITLE, this may be a random question, but I was wondering what application you use when you "zip-through" your videos like when you speed up the video at certain points.
 
N

NadalFan1990

Guest
Nope. This is what I hope to post soon. Just gotta get my hands on some floating clamps. There is a good vid already about starting your mains with floating clamps. I still hold firm that there is a way to start them without double pulling, as he does.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ktxcs5dUoE8
he didn't even put any tension on the two center mains...
he just clamped them at a fairly random spot then started lacing the rest of the mains and tensioning those as he went along
 
hey, I have a quick question here. since I'm going to be using hybrids on a microgel Prestige MP (18 x 20 pattern), I'm pretty sure I won't have enough string to reach the tensioner. I've heard people talk about this "reef knot", but I tried it doesn't really work. this is mainly because the other end of the string in the knot is already attached to the racquet, aka the other end of the string is already tensioned, if you understand what I mean. so, what exactly do I do to extend the string to the tensioner? what I'm talking about here, is that the other end of the red string ( in this diagram) is already tensioned inside the racquet, so I cant get it to make the knot.
 
hey, I have a quick question here. since I'm going to be using hybrids on a microgel Prestige MP (18 x 20 pattern), I'm pretty sure I won't have enough string to reach the tensioner. I've heard people talk about this "reef knot", but I tried it doesn't really work. this is mainly because the other end of the string in the knot is already attached to the racquet, aka the other end of the string is already tensioned, if you understand what I mean. so, what exactly do I do to extend the string to the tensioner? what I'm talking about here, is that the other end of the red string ( in this diagram) is already tensioned inside the racquet, so I cant get it to make the knot.
If you are going to be stringing for a few years, it may be advantages to get a starting clamp, as they are relatively cheap.That way there is no knot slippage for extending the string.
 

GPB

Professional
Last night I completed my 4th racket on my SP Swing. The first 3 I did 2-piece, because it seemed to be the simplest way. This time, though, I used Dire-Desire ATW and loved it. I oughtta add that the racket was a Pro Staff Classic 6.1 (16x19) so I couldn't do a "normal" 1-piece. I love this pattern though (the DD ATW)! The lack of overlaps saved me a ton of time (I usually end up using the awl to push strings out of the way...) and it was nice to only have to tie 2 knots!

Oh, and I did Parnell knots instead of Double Half Hitches. I think the DHH knots look nicer -- what are the advantages of the Parnell?

Thanks, the vids are great!
 
Well basically, i was going to buy a cheap fish scale so i could just check my machine. Is there much difference between a cheap one ($15 ) and that of something like the Ultrasport 30?
Thanks
 
Well basically, i was going to buy a cheap fish scale so i could just check my machine. Is there much difference between a cheap one ($15 ) and that of something like the Ultrasport 30?
Thanks
Should be fine with the cheaper one. I wouldn't get it if it can't be calibrated itself.
 
So what would you suggest to calibrate a machine? A spring 1 i think is too unreliabe, especially after a few years
There's a guy on the forums that has used, with success, a digital fish scale that he bought from wal-mart. I haven't had to use one in quite some time, and even then it wasn't with much regularity. So... I don't have much experience with using one day in and day out. Again, I would chiefly be concerned with being able to calibrate any device that I get.
 
I bought the Ultrasport50. If you get a good reading on something that won't change mass when you first get the meter, you can use that as a baseline. It would be nicer to get a set of measurements close to the range you will be using.

I have a drop weight with known measurements at 35,40,45,50,55,60,65,70. Those are the 8 points I use to check any machine. Doesn't really matter if you go through the effort to actually recalibrate the stringing machine, as long as you can keep track of the difference and know approximately how it compares to other properly calibrated machines.

Likely overkill, but it's nice to have a consistent starting point.
 
Do you know how to fix butt caps?

I have not found a video anywhere on how to fix butt caps. I have found various articles using various methods, but no video and comparisons on how good each solution is.


Thanks if anyone can provide this.
I recently purchased a used racquet on **** and it looked fine, but the buttcap came out in 5 minutes of warmup with it.
 

ls206

Professional
do you mean the trap door thing, or the whole buttcap?

It's tricky because I put weight under my trap door, so I would want to glue it in, but that's an option.

If it's the whole buttcap, you'll need to take the grip off and staple it to the handle
 
hello YUlitle. Refering to this video, "Starting Crosses with a Starting Clamp," since I have flying clamps instead of fixed clamps, do I double pull the first two crosses, and then continue as normal? or is there a better way to do this. I've just ordered my starting clamp as a benefit of tightening knots, but... how will it assist me in two-piece stringjobs? is the only benefit allowing one to use four finishing knots instead of 3 finishing knots and a starting knot? thanks in advance.
 
Yeah, It's the whole buttcap that fell off. I looked under the grip and buttcap and the white structure looks cracked. Never seen under the buttcap before on any racquet till I received this used racquet and it fell off.
Any good solution to this? I'll have to see about borrowing a staple gun, but a way to fill in the gaps/cracks would be nice. I like the racquet.


do you mean the trap door thing, or the whole buttcap?

It's tricky because I put weight under my trap door, so I would want to glue it in, but that's an option.

If it's the whole buttcap, you'll need to take the grip off and staple it to the handle
 
hello YUlitle. Refering to this video, "Starting Crosses with a Starting Clamp," since I have flying clamps instead of fixed clamps, do I double pull the first two crosses, and then continue as normal? or is there a better way to do this. I've just ordered my starting clamp as a benefit of tightening knots, but... how will it assist me in two-piece stringjobs? is the only benefit allowing one to use four finishing knots instead of 3 finishing knots and a starting knot? thanks in advance.
I've not come up with a better way to start crosses with flying clamps. I haven't really had them to try anything, and there only so much mental manipulation of non-existent string jobs that my brain can handle. :D
 
I have a question about the starting mains with fixed clamps (not double pulling) video.

in the beginning you pull both mains and then clamp one of the strings opposite to the side that was closest to the gripper. why is this? because you're just going to have to re-tension the string later as you do in the video. also, wouldn't tensioning the string twice affect it's stiffness?

also, i'm not sure if this is the same with manual linear grippers (since you use an electronic on in the video) but with a rotational gripper I cant pull two strings at the same time since I can't make the gripper hold onto the string.

sorry if this has been asked before, just dont' feel like looking over 1800+ posts to find it.
 
I have a question about the starting mains with fixed clamps (not double pulling) video.

in the beginning you pull both mains and then clamp one of the strings opposite to the side that was closest to the gripper. why is this? because you're just going to have to re-tension the string later as you do in the video. also, wouldn't tensioning the string twice affect it's stiffness?

also, i'm not sure if this is the same with manual linear grippers (since you use an electronic on in the video) but with a rotational gripper I cant pull two strings at the same time since I can't make the gripper hold onto the string.

sorry if this has been asked before, just dont' feel like looking over 1800+ posts to find it.
:D Blast from the past.

Okay, I'm not sure what you mean by clamping the string closest to the gripper because if I was tensioning both center mains, then they would both be "closest."

Yes, tensioning twice does affect stiffness, but it is my belief that it is a better than double pulling for tension (as is customary.)

About the rotational grippers; I've never had trouble pulling two strings with a rotational gripper. The only machine I've seen that I thought might have an issue pulling two at once is the Klippermate.
 
:D Blast from the past.

Okay, I'm not sure what you mean by clamping the string closest to the gripper because if I was tensioning both center mains, then they would both be "closest."

Yes, tensioning twice does affect stiffness, but it is my belief that it is a better than double pulling for tension (as is customary.)

About the rotational grippers; I've never had trouble pulling two strings with a rotational gripper. The only machine I've seen that I thought might have an issue pulling two at once is the Klippermate.
i have an x-2, soon to get a 602fc, but the former could never do two strings at once. it would just slip.

as for closest to the gripper. it's the side of the racquet that is closed to where the string is being tensioned. in the video this would be the top of the racquet and the opposite side (furthest from the gripper) would be the throat of the racquet.
 
i have an x-2, soon to get a 602fc, but the former could never do two strings at once. it would just slip.

as for closest to the gripper. it's the side of the racquet that is closed to where the string is being tensioned. in the video this would be the top of the racquet and the opposite side (furthest from the gripper) would be the throat of the racquet.
You have to lay them side by side in a rotational gripper.
 

GPB

Professional
I forget who brought it up (maybe Irvin?), or where it can be found, but somebody around here suggested starting crosses just like you start the mains with flying clamps, except on the top two strings instead of the middle two. I've used this method the past couple string jobs and it seems to work well.
 
i'm not sure why, but when i try to find this thread via replies/views it doesn't show up. i actually have to use the advance search to find it. anyone else have this problem?

edit: of course after i posted this it now shows up... is there a glitch cause this isn't the first time i had to go through advance search to find this thread.

just wanted to say again, thank you for all you're help yulitle. i'm now looking at the 50-50 method because i heard it can be used to string O3 racquets without a break and boomerang tool.

and while i'm here:

I see. I am actually tensioning BOTH strings on that first clamp.
right now i'm only tensioning one string at a time and it seems to work just fine. i hold one string (string 1) with the fixed clamp and tension the other string (string 2). clamp string 2. tension string 1. clamp string 1, though it is far from the grommet because of the first clamp. I tension another string next to string 2. i then retension string 1 and clamp it closer to the grommet.

is there anything wrong with this? cause i still don't know you tension both string at the same time.

edit again: okay i just saw your video of stringing o3 racquets. i am quite surprised i could've done it all along using my hip....now i feel stupid....
 
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right now i'm only tensioning one string at a time and it seems to work just fine. i hold one string (string 1) with the fixed clamp and tension the other string (string 2). clamp string 2. tension string 1. clamp string 1, though it is far from the grommet because of the first clamp. I tension another string next to string 2. i then retension string 1 and clamp it closer to the grommet.

is there anything wrong with this? cause i still don't know you tension both string at the same time.
If you have fixed clamps, try and tension the 1st main on one side, then tension the 2nd main same side, then tension the 1st main on the opposite side, and you will be able to clamp closer to the racquet frame, as you will not have the clamps that close together to get in the way of positioning where you want them to be.
 
If you have fixed clamps, try and tension the 1st main on one side, then tension the 2nd main same side, then tension the 1st main on the opposite side, and you will be able to clamp closer to the racquet frame, as you will not have the clamps that close together to get in the way of positioning where you want them to be.
yea, i was thinking about that when typing it. though i don't want to put that much stress on it by tensioning another string on the same side... though i have to say using fixed clamps does give me a lot more confidence that it won't slip than the plastic floaters on my x-2
 
yea, i was thinking about that when typing it. though i don't want to put that much stress on it by tensioning another string on the same side... though i have to say using fixed clamps does give me a lot more confidence that it won't slip than the plastic floaters on my x-2
Not that much stress, the USRSA states no more than 3 strings on one side over the opposite side, and this is only 2. There is no problem doing this. This way of starting is even listed in the USRSA Racquet Service Techniques manual! Give it a try, its much easier and you can position the clamps where they should be.To be honest I would think that just about every stringer out there would start the mains this way.
You can always start with a starting clamp on the outside of the frame, pull tension on that 1st main, then go to the opposite main, clamp with the machine clamp, then do the next main on that side, then string one more, then go to the starting clamp side and remove the clamp, and then string as normal. Not worth the trouble to string it that way, I did it once, as it was listed on a site a good while back as a way to start mains utilizing a starting clamp.Easiet to stringf as I listed above.
 
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Hi YULitle

Thanks for the videos. Could you do one for stringing one-piece, bottom-to-top? The racquet I have is the Dunlop Muscle Weave 200G 95. My stringer is the Alpha Pioneer DC+.

Thank you
Kevin
 
well i did a few searches to make sure this is not a duplicate but i feel like someone has mentioned this.
the question is the first and last string on my mains and crosses are not tight enough. i can freely move them up and down but all my other strings are tight. i have a klipper mate stringer. i always try to tie the knots as tight and as close to the grommet hole before releasing the clamp. but i always end in failure. is there a special trick or something that i am missing?
 
well i did a few searches to make sure this is not a duplicate but i feel like someone has mentioned this.
the question is the first and last string on my mains and crosses are not tight enough. i can freely move them up and down but all my other strings are tight. i have a klipper mate stringer. i always try to tie the knots as tight and as close to the grommet hole before releasing the clamp. but i always end in failure. is there a special trick or something that i am missing?
Not uncommon. Not really a problem either. You could always increase the tension a couple pounds on those strings to help if it really bothers you.
 

diredesire

Adjunct Moderator
well i did a few searches to make sure this is not a duplicate but i feel like someone has mentioned this.
the question is the first and last string on my mains and crosses are not tight enough. i can freely move them up and down but all my other strings are tight. i have a klipper mate stringer. i always try to tie the knots as tight and as close to the grommet hole before releasing the clamp. but i always end in failure. is there a special trick or something that i am missing?
It's a two part answer.

1) There's always going to be some tension loss due to the untensioned length of string that is occuring at the point you clamp off, all the way (outside the frame) to the knot you tie. Once you release the clamp, this untensioned length of string is going to affect the final tension of the peripheral mains/crosses. You can deal with/compensate for this in a few ways. Some old-school stringers jam an awl in the tie off hole, but this is a very rare practice these days. Other stringers will bump up the tension on the last main/cross by ~10% to compensate [Side note: Some high end machines even have a "knot" setting, that automatically bumps up by 10%]. Other stringers just understand where the tension loss is coming from (in conjunction with point #2 below) and call it a day. It's all up to you, just do the same thing every time. Consistency is key, here. [Site Note #2: The argument for leaving it as it is: Shorter strings can have lower tension for the same string "stiffness." It doesn't hurt to have the outside main(s) a little lower in tension, it should reduce shock on off-center ball strikes.

#2: Your outside mains will almost never feel as tight as the inside ones. The reason? There's no string on the outside "holding it captive." If you look at the interwoven/interlocked nature of the strings, every center main has two mains next to it indirectly holding it in place due to the weaving of the crosses. This makes it much, much harder for any of those given mains to move. The same cannot be said for the outermost strings. This causes the natural tendency for the outermost strings to migrate outwards (making it much easier to push them outwards).

So cliff's notes: You're losing tension, and it's naturally going to feel looser. It's up to you to decide what you want to do about it. If you're comfortable increasing outside crosses, fine. If you leave it alone, fine. Just do the same thing every time.
 
I just wanted to say thanks for the video on "How to Stop a Rattle Sound in Your Racquet". As someone who recently got an annoying rattle sound of material that has shaken loose inside my racket I was frustrated as to how to get it out. Hopefully my racquet has a "Trap Door" on the butt end to open & get rid of it (its very annoying).

Currently using a Head Youtek six star.

Cheers ~ TG
 
Is the around the world stringing pattern the once piece way to string a racquet?

Asking because I have only ever done the 2 piece method and now that I have my 6.1 95s have stopped using hybrid string setups and would love to just use a one piece method for stringing my racquet.

Never done one piece before so looking for a good place to learn how to do it.
 
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