How much do Teaching professionals get paid?

TagUrIt

Hall of Fame
My coach charges $70 an hour. I have tennis buddy and we generally split the cost and share a lesson. He charges $35 a person for 90 minute tennis clinics and they average 6 players. I like his teaching style and he participates in drills/hitting which helps with your training also.
 

giantschwinn

Semi-Pro
The going rate in socal is $75 an hour. This is for someone who doesn't have a track record. The trick is to find a young coach with the drive and desire to develope junior players quickly. Too many coaches are happy to collect the weekly checks and tell you that developing a player is a marathon. Stay away from those that insist on red, orange and green balls following USTA timelines.
 
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AnyPUG

Professional
Just a general question.
It could be less than you might want to make.
Tennis is the same whether it's played in Tokyo or Iquitos City - there should be one rate for all pros in the world. Anything else is just super common nonsense.
 
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socallefty

Legend
$80 an hour at my club in the Los Angeles area - I think the club sets the prices. A couple of the coaches are ex-ATP pros and can probably get a lot of students even if they charge $120 - they usually coach all the top juniors and a select few of the 4.5+ adults. There are other pros who are ex-college players who currently play only at a 4.5 level and they mostly coach lower-level adults or hold group clinics. Many of the juniors are on long-term development plans and I don’t know if they get a discount for multiple lessons per week for the entire year.

Most of the adults tip the coaches 15-20% on top of the hourly rates. I pay my coach $100 per hour because he is very good at what he does and he works hard all day long.
 
The money sounds a lot but it is not easy to make a living as a coach. You have to pay the court, balls and you also need to pay for your health insurance and so on.

Also it is not easy to get students 8 hours a day and you have to work weekend and evenings so no family friendly job. Also if you are hurt or ill there is no income and depending on the region there is less winter jobs.

So before you complain about the high rate maybe think again.
 

giantschwinn

Semi-Pro
Most of the adults tip the coaches 15-20% on top of the hourly rates. I pay my coach $100 per hour because he is very good at what he does and he works hard all day long.
I’ve never heard anyone tipping the coach. Why are you tipping someone who is basically working for themselves?
 

mnttlrg

Professional
Just a general question.
General answer, they get paid a lot, but don't get a lot of business.

More specific answer, I see the lower level guys getting $70 / hour, and the top guys getting over 100. I live in a wealthy area, and there are only a few guys that get enough repeat business to really do well with it.
 

FatHead250

Professional
I’ve never heard anyone tipping the coach. Why are you tipping someone who is basically working for themselves?
If you are a millionaire like that guy you replied to, you pay people more than they expect for various reasons. For example, it might be internal shame about being way more rich than the guy, and you sort of guilt yourself into paying more because otherwise you might assume the guy would think you are stingy (even if they don't want to or would never admit it or even believe it themselves, stil tehy would think that) by paying the prescribed amount. Also you might give more to feed your own sense of being kind and good by making others happier
 
It could be less than you might want to make.
Tennis is the same whether it's played in Tokyo or Iquitos City - there should be one rate for all pros in the world. Anything else is just super common nonsense.
Tennis might be the same but the skills of the instructors and the economics of the areas are definitely not.
 

socallefty

Legend
I’ve never heard anyone tipping the coach. Why are you tipping someone who is basically working for themselves?
As I said in my post, my club sets their hourly rates and the coaches are not allowed to set their own rates. So, while the coaches are not employees of the club, the club restricts their ability to set their own market-based rates for the privilege of using the club’s courts and having access to the thousands of members. The club also charges them a % of their lesson fees for using the club’s courts

Also, you get good service as a customer when you tip well with all establishments and service providers. My coach will go out of his way to schedule a lesson at a time that is convenient for me even if it means rearranging his own schedule. There are different customs in different parts of the world and many students tip their coaches at my club.

Anyway, this thread is just asking what people pay their coaches and I’m not advocating that everyone should tip their coaches -do it if you want to.
 

Moveforwardalways

Hall of Fame
I have not heard of tipping coaches for routine adult or junior lessons at a private club. If a kid is “special” and can potentially play professionally, different rates may be worked out. However, this is uncommon. Regular highly competitive juniors who come up through an academy are simply paying academy fees, not tipping for the experience. I have never heard of a routine adult rec player tipping, as it is rare that this type of player would take a lesson anyway (would rather spend $1000 on multiple new Pure Aeros strung at slightly different tensions, lol).
 

zipplock

Hall of Fame
If they make minimum wage, yes tip. They are making pharmacist hourly rate. I don't think you tip your pharmacist.
Great. Don't tip then.

The guy I take lessons from had to move back in with his parents because of this virus. He's recently out of college (played college tennis) trying to make a life as a teaching pro. This virus is making it very hard for him. When I get a lesson I give a little extra. I want to encourage him. I want him to succeed. You do as you like.
 
If they make minimum wage, yes tip. They are making pharmacist hourly rate. I don't think you tip your pharmacist.
Don't most pharmacists work full-time? It's not just the hourly rate: if I make $500/hr but can only find 1 hour of work per week, that ain't so good.

Pharmacists don't usually have to find their own patients either.

This isn't an argument for or against tipping, just that your binary view ignores the subtleties.
 

Wheelz

Professional
hmmm, here its 40$ for a good one, canadian dollars. It can maybe go up or down 10-15$ depending on qualification but at 40$ you are already getting a good level coach. This is outdoor on public courts (no private outdoor courts, as long as you have your city card), so they don't have to give a % to a club. Indoor it gets to 60-80$ because of the court fees.
 

TypeRx

Semi-Pro
Don't most pharmacists work full-time? It's not just the hourly rate: if I make $500/hr but can only find 1 hour of work per week, that ain't so good.

Pharmacists don't usually have to find their own patients either.

This isn't an argument for or against tipping, just that your binary view ignores the subtleties.
It never even crossed my mind that one should consider tipping a tennis pro as a general principle, but I do believe there is nothing wrong in tipping ANYONE in a service profession that you feel goes above and beyond. Maybe not always extra cash, as it can be seen as tacky or even a conflict of interest. But something (case of beer, etc.). I could see a great "tip" being a pair of tickets to a local show/concert/game for a tennis pro if not $.

Pharmacists don't all work full time, are paid hourly in common settings (e.g. retail), and aren't paid by the patient or patient volume. So your counter-argument doesn't make much sense either. Regardless, I would NEVER think to tip my pharmacist, nurse, or doctor other than a nice thank you card during the Holidays or something like that.

In SoCal, I have seen certified pro rates all the way from $35 - $150/hour. Massive range that is tailored based on the experience/prestige of the pro plus their target clientele. Also, I guess not everyone is in it for the $$. Average is $75/hour. Take out $15/hour for "club" fees. Even at 20 hours per week, that amount appears commensurate with the amount of education/risk they had to take to become a tennis teaching pro. Also, the fact that they have essentially no/low overhead helps. Bonus if they are also smart with their taxes as they should be able to massively minimize liabilities through legitimate deductions.
 

EP1998

Semi-Pro
Some have minimal overhead using parks etc.

There is also the betting customer...rate changes and/or bonus depending upon how many rounds the player wins.
 
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sureshs

Bionic Poster
$80 an hour at my club in the Los Angeles area - I think the club sets the prices. A couple of the coaches are ex-ATP pros and can probably get a lot of students even if they charge $120 - they usually coach all the top juniors and a select few of the 4.5+ adults. There are other pros who are ex-college players who currently play only at a 4.5 level and they mostly coach lower-level adults or hold group clinics. Many of the juniors are on long-term development plans and I don’t know if they get a discount for multiple lessons per week for the entire year.

Most of the adults tip the coaches 15-20% on top of the hourly rates. I pay my coach $100 per hour because he is very good at what he does and he works hard all day long.
This is the first time I have heard of a tennis coach getting tipped.
 

Fintft

Legend
While I heartly agree with the giantshschwinn's entire post, if I may add:

I found a younger girl coach, who had a higher coaching degree (according to her) then the head coach at the largest coach in town and she charges half, like $40 (I pay $50 lately, b/c she usually also brings a brother and they were students).

So she charges half and her lessons are about twice as interesting and customized to you then the other pro(s), plus she speaks my native language (so no misscommunications there).

She is a former WTA player and mainly trains her brother, who played Futurities and Challengers and who is the current city champion (in Canada's capital Ottawa), but has been plagued by injuries (former opponent of Shapavalov at juniors)
She used to be a pro at another club, but then focused on her studies and work.

Other places where pros teach for less are Eastern Europe or South America:e.g. in Eastern Europe I don't pay more then $30 for a GREAT pro and that includes the court fees on perfectly maintained red clay (the courts alone can be be found for as little as $5-10/h).

With a couple of those coaches I'm actually good friends now and hike etc. :D

The going rate in socal is $75 an hour. This is for someone who doesn't have a track record. The trick is to find a young coach with the drive and desire to develope junior players quickly. Too many coaches are happy to collect the weekly checks and tell you that developing a player is a marathon. Stay away from those that insist on red, orange and green balls following USTA timelines.
 

Miki 1234

Semi-Pro
Funny post, in my city guys with atp points spar and coach for 10 dollars and no one wants to pay.
Balkan rules haha.
I know a guy asked a sparing for his daughter 300 wta ranked and the coach/ sparing was also ex player and coach asked for 10 euro per hour and the dad said can you do it for 7? True story.
They worked for 10 in the end .
 
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Fabresque

Hall of Fame
Sorry guys, I think i was more looking at a general salary I guess. I know they don’t have a “formal salary” but is 40k in the ball-park?
 

NLBwell

Legend
I made $70 an hour on my own 6 years ago when I was teaching. When working for a facility, I ended up with about 1/2 of that after they take their cut. I also used to teach for $10 an hour and free indoor court time (which was difficult to get at any price).
Teaching outdoors in the summer I could make good money - lots of demand and I got to keep all the money I earned on my own. Not very good money the rest of the year. It's difficult to get enough students much of the year and you only get a % of the money.
Where you live will make a big difference in how much you can make teaching tennis.
 

Miki 1234

Semi-Pro
Its not a good job if you really dont love it and even then its bad.But there are exemptions .
If you have people skills then you can make money .If you only know tennis you are not in good position. Its just to real for most people.
Best coaches in the world know tennis but are more then willing to take money from anyone
and promise results but only have real interest in top talents and put their energy in such players while not keeping their promise to lesser players , coz only top talents are good advertise.
in the end its only way to make top money.
And also depends on position .
Its not a carrier choice thats for sure.
Only if you really love it and if you habe nothing better to do it can do.
In my opinion coaching is about having many players that play against each other like college.
That makes sence , i dont know the salary tho.
And single hour private coaching is well not so great with some exemptions , with corona even worse...


 
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NLBwell

Legend
You have to love TEACHING tennis. Many good players are poor teachers and unhappy in their job of teaching tennis because they love playing tennis and don't know what else to do. They usually find something else to do after a while.
 
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