*** New Stringway Cross Stringing Tool***

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by 1012007, Nov 9, 2008.

  1. 1012007

    1012007 Hall of Fame

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    Guys - i just got an email off Stringway. The email contains a document which has a pic of the aluminium cross stringer and all the benefits of the tool. It also explains the 2 versions of the tool they have and shows the introductory offer they are selling the tool at up until 20th of February (10 days). If anyone wants the document, give me a quick pm and ill happily send it to you.

    They also told me if I "want to receive any more information or a newsletter about the tools contact Alpha Tennis in the US info@alphatennis.com or Stringway outside the US info@stringway-nl.com"
     
    #51
  2. william7gr

    william7gr Professional

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    Any info on how much $$$$$ this will cost?
     
    #52
  3. Il Mostro

    Il Mostro Banned

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    ^^^^^^
    $130.00 for two (HD&LD) if pre-ordered from Alpha. $89.00 each after that. Mark tried these at the GSS symposium and says the real benefit is on natural gut (leaves it in virtually untouched condition) and poly (just easier if you are doing a lot of poly jobs). No real benefit on SG. YMMV.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2009
    #53
  4. Bolivian Ace

    Bolivian Ace Rookie

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    That looks way too slow!!! I wouldn't use it.
     
    #54
  5. 1012007

    1012007 Hall of Fame

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    The introductory offer from Alpha/SW is $77.95 and $129.90 for the set.



    After February 20th that increases to $89.90 and $154.90.
     
    #55
  6. supermario343

    supermario343 Hall of Fame

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    lmao i was thinking the same thing hahahah
     
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  7. eteaGuy

    eteaGuy New User

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    From the video, it looks like Mr. Apple from the Fruit of the Loom gang was doing the demonstration.

    This tool seems like a great idea with its benefits, but the other day when I saw the stringer who worked on Nadal's racquet at the AO I was even more impressed. The guy sandwiched his palms together, one on top and one on the bottom of the mains stringbed and just weaved the crosses so effortlessly back and forth in a very short amount of time. And he was doing this while talking to the camera people.
     
    #57
  8. 1012007

    1012007 Hall of Fame

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    Just recieved these pics. The tool is made out of Aluminuim rather than the material in the video

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    #58
  9. NoobWannabe

    NoobWannabe Rookie

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    I dont understand why they charge an arm and a leg for this simple tool, I mean you can easily make this yourself.
     
    #59
  10. william7gr

    william7gr Professional

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    If you make one tell be how you made it.
     
    #60
  11. NoobWannabe

    NoobWannabe Rookie

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    It's basically a combination of 2 combs, one used to push the main strings down and the other one is to push them up, alternately. Then you insert the cross string through the opening, With this knowledge i think you can figure out how to make one yourself, it's not that hard. You just have to choose material that won dmg the string that's all.
     
    #61
  12. topspin

    topspin Semi-Pro

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    After reading through this thread, I will not get this tool even though it is an interesting idea. I would only get it if I did a lot of full natural gut jobs. Another reason I won't get it is because of that crazy balloon the woman is wearing. And whoa is she ever slow!
     
    #62
  13. NoobWannabe

    NoobWannabe Rookie

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    I can see that this tool sold for about 40 bucks but come on 80 bucks?? what a ripoff
     
    #63
  14. Lefty78

    Lefty78 Professional

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    One might better try to kill a mosquito with a cannon.

    This device appears to create bigger hassles than the ones it solves.
     
    #64
  15. JamesBond

    JamesBond Rookie

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    I do tend to agree with you, but before closing the subject on this note, here's a story that may interest you :

    In the late eighties I bought a large stock of 6 metres lengths of Klipspringer natural gut strings so that I could make hybrid strings with Luxilon (and also polyester) mains and natural gut crosses. It worked well with the Babolat VS in the crosses, but this was too expensive and the Klip deal was a great opportunity, I bought several hundred half sets.

    Unfortunately I had huge problems with the gut getting twisted and unravelling. The last 5 or 6 crosses looked more like rough cotton twine than natural gut, it played well but looked terrible. Not like the expensive, top quality string that it was supposed to be. A total loss . . .

    The Klip crosses were forgotten in a carton for a couple of years, but during an ISPO Trade Show (in Munich), I stumbled across a tool which was supposed to make it easy to string in gut crosses. I begged the stringer to sell it to me (it was not on sale at the show), took it back home and tried to find a solution for my Klip crosses. It was perfect, no more problems of hopeless twisting and unravelling, I managed to get rid of my stock of gut and the cross-stringer had paid for itself after the first 5 strings. What would have been a sad loss became a super profit, thanks to the "cross-stringer".

    As I only bought the tool for the Klip crosses, I chucked it in a box and forgot about it until this thread reminded me of the fact that I actually have one of the original SW cross-stringing tools.

    The curiosity got the better of me, I scrounged around until I found it, then after a few problems trying to remember how it all fits together I managed to string a racquet with a co-polymer mono in both mains and crosses. To my surprise it's really an interesting concept.

    I've now strung up 6 racquets (4 knots, crosses T to B) and much as I don't feel that I string quicker (nor slower), it's certainly "lay-back", no effort at all for about 15 crosses, you can put in the 16th cross by weaving in 1 cross behind the tool, but you have to put in the last 3 crosses by hand weaving. That's no big deal, you would have to do that anyway if you string the crosses by hand.

    The only problem I have noted with the original tool is that there is only one tool with two different cams (or combs) which are designed to fit the spaces in between the main strings. One for 16 (tight) mains, the other for 14 (more open) mains. The gaps for the strings are too regular and they don't always fit the string pattern in a satisfactory way.

    It looks as though this has been improved with the new version, there are now 2 tools instead of 1, and it looks like the gaps become larger towards the extremities of the mains. If in fact each tool has been correctly calibrated to fit either high density or lower density string patterns, in my humble opinion this could well be a very useful tool to have, not only for gut strings, but also for monos and polyesters which, as I have always insisted, need to be treated with the same respect as a natural gut.

    I would need to test each of these "SW cross-stringers" to give a well considered opinion on the real advantages of these tools, but from the satisfaction that I had over 15 years ago and my pleasent surprise on re-discovering the old version, which despite some short comings is still a great invention.

    This tool reminds me of the original hand looms which are still used in the mid-east to make mats and other woven cloths. Can you imagine how difficult it would be to weave by hand, without a mechanical loom ?

    When stringing a racquet, we are weaving the crosses almost the same way that you would weave a mat. Why would the use of a mechanical loom be something to scorn at and to make fun of when stringing a racquet ?

    Apart from the professional stringers who would not like to under rate their talents, how many other stringers who continue to struggle with weaving in the crosses, would not be delighted to make their task easier by using a cross-stringing tool ?

    Personally, I think that we should take a closer look at what this invention has to offer, I will certainly follow up the subject and keep you posted on my findings.
    JB.
     
    #65
  16. scotus

    scotus Legend

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    I have never used Klipspringer natural gut, but some of these cheap guts out there (e.g., Grand Slam Gut) have snapped on the mains, so I don't think that this device would help in this instance.

    But for some semi-decent guts it might do wonders.
     
    #66
  17. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    JamesBond, thanks for sharing that story. Would you mind posting a photo??
     
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  18. JamesBond

    JamesBond Rookie

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    Yep, I have a photo of the beast and I will do my best to show it to you, here's my first try :


    [​IMG]

    If it works, (this time it's fine) you will notice that the the old model looks like crocodile's teeth (more teeth and less pitch between them), where as new tools are much more simple, less grooves and a more precise movement, it really looks like there have been some progress in what was already a very good tool.
    Simpler is often better . . .
    JB


     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2009
    #68
  19. 1012007

    1012007 Hall of Fame

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    JB thanks for posting the pic, that pic is probably the best so far as it shows it at a good angle. When or if will you try the tool??
     
    #69
  20. JamesBond

    JamesBond Rookie

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    I have already used my original tool many times, what interests me is to try the new version. Thanks for your help in trying to post my photo, but somewhere I messed it up. I have sent you my photo by e-mail, can you try to sort it for me as I really don't understand what I need to do to make it work right. On my post there is all that URL address which shouldn't be there, if you can get it right I will try remove mine. It's a shame to have such a poor quality photo, it really is much better.

    Thanks again for your help.
    JB
    Edit : thanks, I tried again and this time it worked fine, even at my age I can still learn something new, that's re-assuring. There may be some hope for me after all . . .
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2009
    #70
  21. 1012007

    1012007 Hall of Fame

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    Here you go JB
    It should be bigger aswell
    [​IMG]
     
    #71
  22. Racer41c

    Racer41c Semi-Pro

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    What the heck? do you have to wear that to use the tool?
     
    #72
  23. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    JB, thanks for the follow-up. Great photo as well. As someone else pointed out, the angle it is taken really shows what the machine looks like when on the strings. !!!!

    A++++
     
    #73
  24. Bud

    Bud Bionic Poster

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    Yes... yes you do... it temporarily holds the air from your head while stringing the crosses :)
     
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  25. Bud

    Bud Bionic Poster

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    :lol::lol::lol:

    It's not quite as simple as it looks.
     
    #75
  26. 1012007

    1012007 Hall of Fame

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    JB - have you tried the tool yet??
     
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  27. GnRFan

    GnRFan New User

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    Hey,

    Does anyone know if it is possible to use this tool without having to change tension on the crossed by 8 or so lbs? Can you just remove the tool for each cross and tension the crosses as normal. I am interested in trying it for gut.

    Cody
     
    #77
  28. 1012007

    1012007 Hall of Fame

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    If you mean, tension the string while it is in the tool, there will be no friction as the crosses arent touching the mains. You will then have to decrease tension to compensate for the lack of friction. I am not sure how much you would have to decrease your tension by, to create the same tension as if you werent tensioning through the tool.

    Yeah you can do that. Thats probably the best thing to do, as when doing customers rackets etc, you still know the correct tension etc
     
    #78
  29. 1012007

    1012007 Hall of Fame

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    Hello guys,
    I have just been informed by Stringway that there new cross stringing tools will be available from next week, and they have produced a video to show the tool in action, from the beginning to the end of a string job:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjTYW3947JM


    As you can see, it doesn’t take long to weave a cross. It also looks very easy to pull all the string through the tool, which would save a lot of time. As the string just goes straight through the tool it would take the same time to weave a stiff polyester and natural gut. Also, no damage would be done to the main or cross strings.
     
    #79
  30. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    ^^^Thanks for sharing. Cool and practical tool. Although not sure this will ever catch on big with a lot of stringers.
     
    #80
  31. 1012007

    1012007 Hall of Fame

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    Thats alright drak, my I ask.. why do you think it will never catch on?
    I would of thought it would save people alot of time just because they dont have to pull the string through after each weave, meaning there is no friction between the main and cross strings. This would make life easier esp when stringing nat gut or stiff poly's. In the video, it literally takes the person 1 second to weave the string through the tool. In theory, this will cut loads of time, as all the weaves will be done in 20 secs.
     
    #81
  32. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    ^^^I believe "Purist" would never "degrade" themselves to use such a tool. They are too into the "art" of stringing, and very proud of their stringing prowless.

    I also believe they may feel it is too much of a headache to set the tool up on the mains, and then turn the handle to do one weave, then the other, etc.

    Just my 2 cents. :)
     
    #82
  33. jmverdugo

    jmverdugo Hall of Fame

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    I think it is a good tool that would save a lot of time to professional stringers once they get used to it. For someone that string a couple of rackes a day it would be just a nice gadget to have because the time saved would be minimal.

    On another note the videos are worth to watch just to listen the music.
     
    #83
  34. Redflea

    Redflea Hall of Fame

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    It seems like a lot of the better stringers may avoid this feeling they are better off with their skilled hands...but for those who string less frequently and might gain the most benefit, the pricing makes it quite reach given the smaller number of racquets they amortize the cost over.

    I think the best market for this is the stringer more in my category, albeit at a lower price point.

    I'm an occasional stringer - just string for me, wife and two kids, and occasionally for some of my friends. So speed isn't an issue for me - I'm watching TV/listening to the radio and interacting w/my family while I'm stringing.

    But if it was cheaper (like $50) I would buy it, just because it would make stringing easier...weaving the crosses is the least enjoyable part of stringing for me and I don't do it often enough to get really good at it. So for me (and I think other stringers like me) it would remove the "PITA" portion from the stringing process.

    Someone from Stringway listening? $50 and my money is yours. $90 and I'll keep suffering along... :)
     
    #84
  35. 1012007

    1012007 Hall of Fame

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    Redflea:
    Some thoughts in answer to yours:
    Personally, I believe a consistent stringer is a consistent stringer and when the highest point of consistency is reached, the quality of the weaving cannot be improved. So I do not see the advantage for better stringers to weave by hand:

    It is more convenient and faster to use the cross stringing tool, and it is more relaxed so you can do more racquets in succession.
    On top of that it is better for the string, and in my opinion craftsman should use the best and easiest way to get the job done. Why would all experienced stringers want very expensive electronic machines, but not buy a simple but effective tool, which will make stringing easier and quicker?

    About the price: It may be mistaken the tool is a cheap product that comes from China for $10. I have double-checked this and it’s not the case. I was told the tool is a result of difficult pieces of CNC milling work which is more expensive then people may think. (the inside is much more complicated than the outside).

    Stringway said they may consider casting, but in that case the high cost of the 2 moulds have to be earned back.
     
    #85
  36. Redflea

    Redflea Hall of Fame

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    Good post...

    My comment regarding experienced stringers was more that a lot of them may be unwilling to buy it (even if it has a benefit for them). Human nature at work. :)


     
    #86
  37. 1012007

    1012007 Hall of Fame

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    Yeah I suppose thats also true:) Many of them will not want to believe a tool is better than them:)
     
    #87
  38. Bud

    Bud Bionic Poster

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    It seems to be more of a hassle than it's worth as crosses are not difficult to weave.
     
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  39. 1012007

    1012007 Hall of Fame

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    I dont think weaving is difficult, just time consuming. Looking at the video, the tool is quicker at weaving than I am and any experienced stringer.

    PS, I have replied to your email:)
     
    #89
  40. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    ^^^Not entirely sure about that. I'm fairly confident lots of stringers out there could finish a string job faster without that tool.

    obviously, once the tool is set up, putting the string through it is going to be faster than weaving. However, setting the tool up after each weave seems more time consuming.

    I wonder if any of the more experienced stringers have one of, and use this tool. I may have to purcahse one just to see how good it is.
     
    #90
  41. 1012007

    1012007 Hall of Fame

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    Thats what I was talking about:) The speed of the tool though will vary on the user. With the tool, a beginner who has used the tool 10 times could be quicker than a experienced string who has used the tool 10 times
     
    #91
  42. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Seriously true. I wanted to buy one immediately after the music started even before I saw it in action. Then when I saw it I wanted to buy it even more because I LOATHE weaving crosses.

    Doh, found it.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2009
    #92
  43. 1012007

    1012007 Hall of Fame

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    Adding to what I said:

    Drak - You mean moving and closing it is time consuming?? You enter the tool into the main strings only once for a stringing job.

    About the speed: SW tells me, that an inexperienced stringer who is experienced with the tool can do the crosses in around 10 minutes. I think that that is quite quick.
    Certainly if you realize that a poly and gut go through as easy as a nylon.

    It is not only the weaving that goes quicker, you can also pull the string through as fast as you can without any friction.
     
    #93
  44. 1012007

    1012007 Hall of Fame

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    Beernutz, i copied this from the other thread.
    LOL I received the video from SW a long time ago and actually put the video on my own youtube account, just to share with everyone. I'll take it down as you suggested
     
    #94
  45. Redflea

    Redflea Hall of Fame

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    Hopefully none of Pink Floyd's lawyers are tennis players, or Stringway is going to get a cease and desist notice. :)

    That video really makes it clear how it works and how to use it. I want one!

    Hey - I know. Anyone want to split one with me? I'll pay half, you pay the other half. I'll keep it for the first 10 years, then you get it the second ten years... ;)
     
    #95
  46. SLow

    SLow New User

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    Imagine how much easier it will be to string up a prestige mid using gamma rough
     
    #96
  47. 1012007

    1012007 Hall of Fame

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    I have just remembered about this thread:)
    I believe the tool has been out almost around 1 month now. Has anyone bought and received it, what do you think?
    Hopefully mine should be arriving very shortly. I will post back when it arrives, should be in the next couple of days
     
    #97
  48. JamesBond

    JamesBond Rookie

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    So let's pick-up where I left-off some time ago, this week I finally received the 2 tools in the cross-stringer kit. The first surprise is that these are really high quality precision instruments, not molded aluminium like the MK1, these have been machined out of a solid block. They are very impressive.
    I have strung up a couple of sticks, 2 using the HD (High Density) and 2 using the LD (Low Density) and in both cases the tools were very easy to use and amazingly efficient.
    I will add to this thread to give some interesting details, a little patience please.
    Later,
    JB :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2009
    #98
  49. JamesBond

    JamesBond Rookie

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    Hi y'all,

    The first point that I wanted to make is that the original MK1 cross-stringer was conceived about 20 years ago and it had 2 string-density settings using the same tool but with 2 different combs :
    > 1 for string patterns in wooden frames (tight : HD)
    > 1 for the Prince O/S frames in aluminum. (open : LD)
    The problem with this tool was that the combs were not always well adapted to the string patterns generally found in most racquets today.

    So the real challenge for Stringway was to develop a more versatile tool, well adapted to our needs. They have opted to make 2 modèles :
    > the MK2 HD (high density string patterns)
    > the MK2 LD (low density string patterns)
    and both tools are necessary if you want to make the most of this concept.

    I insist on this because I have just strung up 2 different Dunlop frames :
    > an Aerogel 200 95 sq.in. with a 16/19 with dense string pattern
    > an Aerogel 400 100 sq.in. with a 16/19 with a more open string pattern
    and it became quickly evident that despite the fact that these 2 frames are almost the same size and that they have the same number of mains and crosses, each frame required the approprate cross-stringer, the HD for the Aerogel 200 and the LD for the Aerogel 400.

    This is why I advise you to take the kit of both tools, not just one or the other, because you will not be able to string the majority of the tennis racquets with just one cross-stringer.

    This leads me to another important point, there have been several posts either complaining about the prices or joking about the real interest of this remarkable invention :
    > firstly, the price is quite high, especially for the kit of 2 cross-stringers, but there is incredible value for money once you have these tools in hand.
    > secondly, these tools are going to change the way we are going to string tennis racquets in the future.

    Seeing is believing, stringing with them a couple of times will illiminate any doubts you can have about the success that these tools will enjoy. Once you get the knack of it, you just don't want to go back to your usual way of stringing. Just ask your fingers after 3 or 4 sticks, no way back . . .

    These tools make stringing crosses amazingly easy, it's a lay back way to work, whether you string polys, rough or textured monos, natural gut and even rubbery multis, all can be woven into place quickly, with little effort, and requiring a minimum of attention. It's probably not fool-proof, but any stringer, even a beginner can learn to string the crosses efficiently after a couple of racquets.

    I sincerely believe that the Stringway cross-stringers are a milestone in the tennis stringer's world, they are really going to change things permanently. It will take time to pick up momentum, but once it takes off, everyone and his dog will want to string with these things, no matter how expensive some of you think they are, because the service they render largely outweighs their cost, in my opinion they pay for themselves with-in a couple of months at the most . . .

    I will update in a week or so, once I really get into the habit of using these tools. The first impression is extremely positive, I can't wait to get on top of this concept, I'm sure that they are even better than I had imagined.:idea:
    JB.
     
    #99
  50. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Can you weave every cross with them or do you have to take them out to weave the last cross(es) by hand?
     

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