***Stringway Machine Users Club***

PURPOSE:
The intent of this club is to be a central resource for current and past owners of Stringway machines, in order to share personal experiences with use of the machine(s), tools, techniques, tips, and to collaborate on information and questions. Hopefully it can also be a resource for those exploring Stringway as an option.

TW MESSAGE BOARD GUIDELINES:
Please review if you are not familiar with them: http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=3

ADDITIONAL GUIDELINES:
1. No competitor discussion, please.
2. Keep comments positive and focused on the product. We want this forum to remain in good standing.
3. This forum is for information sharing and not to promote direct or indirect sales of Stringway products.

MY EXPERIENCE
I recently acquired a very nice, used Stringway ML100 with T98 fixed clamps (sold as a Laserfibre MS200tt). After nine years of stringing on an entry-level drop-weight machine, I spent the last year researching upgrade options that would allow me to offer stringing services to my local tennis community. My requirements included simplicity, reliability, predictability, consistency, portability, and continuous pull. Through information and feedback in other TW forums as well as directly from machine owners, I decided to pursue a Stringway drop-weight. A testament to the following of the Stringway products, it took a good amount of time and patience to find a used machine. After a long road trip to pick it up, I downloaded the manual and used it to completely disassemble the machine, clean it, lubricate it, overhaul the clamps, and silicone the frame. I am the third owner, but the machine is still in great shape. I have only used it a few times thus far, but am very happy with it. I quickly decided to invest in two triple and one double flying clamps, as well as the cross stringing tools and am impressed with both. I string a lot of gut, and have found the clamps and tensioner to be very gentle.



If you own (or have owned) a Stringway, please feel free to join this club and share your story with these wonderful machines. Posting pics is welcome as well.

Thanks in advance to each of you for your contribution. As this club develops I hope you will find this sharing of experience and information beneficial.

10SDad

MEMBERS - 40
1: 10SDad
2: BlxTennis
3: scotus
4: Slitch
5: Peppershaker
6: cluckcluck
7: Pbarrow
8: onehandbh
9: _skunk_
10: pstar
11: diredesire
12: Power Player
13: ike81
14: TennisCJC
15: Bugs
16: Joonas
17: Overheadsmash
18: JasperJ
19: marco_forehand
20: Maui19
21: Darkhors
22: TfReAk
23: Audiophile
24: 7zero
25: volusiano
26: oble
27: hyperion99
28: eagle
29: elkwood
30: Learner46
31: Rysty
32: Purist
33: beepee1972
34: Herge
35: 66darren66
36: skhoman
37: Albie
38: MathieuR
39: LMW
40: Kingair001
41: Mkpk
PURPOSE:
The intent of this club is to be a central resource for current and past owners of Stringway machines, in order to share personal experiences with use of the machine(s), tools, techniques, tips, and to collaborate on information and questions. Hopefully it can also be a resource for those exploring Stringway as an option.

TW MESSAGE BOARD GUIDELINES:
Please review if you are not familiar with them: http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=3

ADDITIONAL GUIDELINES:
1. No competitor discussion, please.
2. Keep comments positive and focused on the product. We want this forum to remain in good standing.
3. This forum is for information sharing and not to promote direct or indirect sales of Stringway products.

MY EXPERIENCE
I recently acquired a very nice, used Stringway ML100 with T98 fixed clamps (sold as a Laserfibre MS200tt). After nine years of stringing on an entry-level drop-weight machine, I spent the last year researching upgrade options that would allow me to offer stringing services to my local tennis community. My requirements included simplicity, reliability, predictability, consistency, portability, and continuous pull. Through information and feedback in other TW forums as well as directly from machine owners, I decided to pursue a Stringway drop-weight. A testament to the following of the Stringway products, it took a good amount of time and patience to find a used machine. After a long road trip to pick it up, I downloaded the manual and used it to completely disassemble the machine, clean it, lubricate it, overhaul the clamps, and silicone the frame. I am the third owner, but the machine is still in great shape. I have only used it a few times thus far, but am very happy with it. I quickly decided to invest in two triple and one double flying clamps, as well as the cross stringing tools and am impressed with both. I string a lot of gut, and have found the clamps and tensioner to be very gentle.



If you own (or have owned) a Stringway, please feel free to join this club and share your story with these wonderful machines. Posting pics is welcome as well.

Thanks in advance to each of you for your contribution. As this club develops I hope you will find this sharing of experience and information beneficial.

10SDad

MEMBERS - 40
1: 10SDad
2: BlxTennis
3: scotus
4: Slitch
5: Peppershaker
6: cluckcluck
7: Pbarrow
8: onehandbh
9: _skunk_
10: pstar
11: diredesire
12: Power Player
13: ike81
14: TennisCJC
15: Bugs
16: Joonas
17: Overheadsmash
18: JasperJ
19: marco_forehand
20: Maui19
21: Darkhors
22: TfReAk
23: Audiophile
24: 7zero
25: volusiano
26: oble
27: hyperion99
28: eagle
29: elkwood
30: Learner46
31: Rysty
32: Purist
33: beepee1972
34: Herge
35: 66darren66
36: skhoman
37: Albie
38: MathieuR
39: LMW
40: Kingair001
41: Mkpk10s
 
The Stringlab 2 has to be adjusted on LB to show the right dimensions of the stiffness in DT and kg/cm.

We discovered a better way to carry out this adjustment as shown on this video: \

 
I owned an ML100 before I switched over to the foot-operated machine (MS 200 ?). If memory serves, the standard weight that comes with the machine has a maximum tension of around 60 lbs, so if you plan to go higher than that, you need to purchase an extra weight.

I do believe that stretchy strings can force you to pull twice. At least with the MS200, I had to do that quite often.

The other thing I hated about the ML100 was having to use the ruler to set tension, because the numbers are not printed directly on the tensioning arm/rod.
Scotus, I'm a little confused by your statement that you had to pull twice with the MS200.
My understanding that the MS200 being a Constant Pull machine, all you'd have to do is wait a reasonable amount of time to take out the initial creep of the string before you clamp off.
Is my understanding wrong?
 
Scotus, I'm a little confused by your statement that you had to pull twice with the MS200.
My understanding that the MS200 being a Constant Pull machine, all you'd have to do is wait a reasonable amount of time to take out the initial creep of the string before you clamp off.
Is my understanding wrong?
It is constant pull, but the distance it can pull is limited. If you're dealing with very stretchy strings like natural gut or some multis, the tensioner will pull all the way to its max range but still be unable to reach the correct tension. So you have to re-step on the lever (pedal), take the slack off the string around the gripper and re-pull.
 
It is constant pull, but the distance it can pull is limited. If you're dealing with very stretchy strings like natural gut or some multis, the tensioner will pull all the way to its max range but still be unable to reach the correct tension. So you have to re-step on the lever (pedal), take the slack off the string around the gripper and re-pull.
Thanks for the explanation Scotus. I now understand.
Is this an engineering flaw in the design of the MS200? Is there another way to overcome the problem with highly-elastic strings other than having to double-pull/take out slack?
Perhaps Fred could opine.
 
Thanks for the explanation Scotus. I now understand.
Is this an engineering flaw in the design of the MS200? Is there another way to overcome the problem with highly-elastic strings other than having to double-pull/take out slack?
Perhaps Fred could opine.


I do not think that it is an engineering flaw of the MS200.

It has to do with the dimensions of a rotating system and it is the same for all Stringway machines.

But there is an easy work around and a tuning question:

* Our advises when you string stretchy strings are:

- Do the second pull without moving the clamps. Just lift the lever, tighten the string and pull again. The tensioner needs less travel for the second pull.

- Prestretch the hole length of string by hand before you start to string. As long as you stay below the stringing tension this does not have any influence on the playability and it string easier and with less loss of tension.
* An important question is if stretchy strings should be strung at high tensions?

In our opinion this does not make any sense:

The player feels the elongation of the string only when the string bed actually deflects. If not the string does not stretch and the player can impossibly feel how it stretches.

That is why the stringer feels the SBS first and if that is not too high he will feel the quality of the string.

That is why our Tension Advisor advises the combination of the SBS and type of string together.

https://www.stringwaynederland.nl/SW-TA-online/SwingCalc/tad-en.php
 
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I am now set up with a vintage LaserFibre M60-TR with flying clamps thanks to help of Technatic. Having strung on an old school Oliver, Extelon/Neos, and Gamma X-ES, I absolutely love the accuracy, simplicity and engineering prowess of Stringway. Does anyone out there have a spare "locking bar" which keeps the tension bar with weight at 45 degrees at rest? The locking bar attaches to the base and the red tension head rests on top of it. Thanks in advance for any help/suggestions.
 
Thanks for the explanation Scotus. I now understand.
Is this an engineering flaw in the design of the MS200? Is there another way to overcome the problem with highly-elastic strings other than having to double-pull/take out slack?
Perhaps Fred could opine.
Rather than a flaw, think of iit as a limitation that can be worked around by a little more work on the part of the user. I have moved on to Babolat Star 5 and enjoy not having to deal with those limitations.
 
Rather than a flaw, think of iit as a limitation that can be worked around by a little more work on the part of the user. I have moved on to Babolat Star 5 and enjoy not having to deal with those limitations.
Last time I checked you could purchase at least three MS200s for the price of one Star 5. The extra cost can also be viewed as a significant limitation of the Star 5 ;)
 
Last time I checked you could purchase at least three MS200s for the price of one Star 5. The extra cost can also be viewed as a significant limitation of the Star 5 ;)
Of course, the more expensive machines in general offer more amenities.

In my case, I found a lightly used Star 5 at a price lower than a new Stringway, so it worked out great for me.
 
Thanks Technatic! I'm enjoying this Users Club and the Stringway machine!
It feels good to help people who are still so happy with their very old Stringway machines.

I got this message from another "long time users" this morning:

Hi Fred I have owned and operated one of your MS 200 machines for nearly 20 years now. I bought mine from the former laser fiber salesman Tim. I have had not one moment of trouble with my machine it is without a doubt the best stringing machine on the market. With its unique tensioning head and racquet mounting systems it is the best machine to string rackets that has ever been made.

I may be in need of a few of the nylon pieces that go on the gripper arms and the two large nylon circles at the top that hold the racquet head.
If those are the only parts that he needs after 20 years we are happy to supply them for a special price.
 
Because many users have a lot of confidence in our 5 point direct support we will offer both light weight machines with this support from now on.

They are called the MS140NS and MS140LS





 
We have evaluated the MS140 project with the following conclusions:

- MS140 users are very happy with their machine we never get any comments or questions.

- Most of the MS140 users do not use the machine for travelling.

- Potential buyers have more confidence in the standard 5point racquet support than in the support of the MS140

- We managed to lower the cost price of the machine considerably.

- Potential buyers think that the “light weight” means less strong and less sturdy.

These conclusions result in the following decisions:

- We will not offer the MS140 as a light weight machine anymore. We will sell it as MS200 technique in a portable machine. There is nothing about the machine that is less reliable than with the MS200.

- Prices will go down considerably.

- We will only supply the MS140 with the 5 point racquet support from now on.
 
I am a proud member of the Stringway Users Club.
I recognize that Fred (Technatic) posting on the boards might seem (to those who are not fully on board with Stringway's approach) like self promotion. I say any company/individual who is offering to manufacture a piece for a machine built and sold twenty years ago deserves recognition.
My personal experience dealing with a French company that spends a lot of money on advertising (self promotion) and one of it's older, out of production machines was very different. I never had the chance to communicate with anybody in a senior position with their US distributor or in their main office.
The people who did reply offered half hearted worthless advice. Then I was told the only way to move forward was to ship the unit back to France, with no promise that it would be fixed, just looked at.
Stringing equipment should, in my opinion, be made to last. It should also be made in such a way that if it fails, it can be fixed in the field.
Stringway gets that.
(The Eketlon H is another example of classic, time tested machine that is built to be used for decades)

One more thing in this regard, in my opinion, a simple design will be easier to maintain over the long term. Minimal (or NO) electronics is a plus.
 
Thank you Marco for this nice compliment.

We are very happy that we can work so directly together with users all over the world and it gives us a lot of satisfaction that stringers are still so happy with machines that we made so many years ago.

And as you say simplicity is the first step to high quality.
 
We have evaluated the MS140 project with the following conclusions:

- MS140 users are very happy with their machine we never get any comments or questions.

- Most of the MS140 users do not use the machine for travelling.

- Potential buyers have more confidence in the standard 5point racquet support than in the support of the MS140

- We managed to lower the cost price of the machine considerably.

- Potential buyers think that the “light weight” means less strong and less sturdy.

These conclusions result in the following decisions:

- We will not offer the MS140 as a light weight machine anymore. We will sell it as MS200 technique in a portable machine. There is nothing about the machine that is less reliable than with the MS200.

- Prices will go down considerably.

- We will only supply the MS140 with the 5 point racquet support from now on.
Hi Fred,
I'm very glad to see the reorganisation of your MS140 offering.
One thing that springs to my mind is perhaps also a redevelopment at the MS200 towards a lighter version. For example, the MS200 turntable seems very bulky and heavy to me. Perhaps in the days when it was first designed, materials and structural integrity required the bulk, but given the lightness and the rigidity of the MS140 turntable is able to withstand a whopping 72lbs tensile pull, I'm wondering why not devise a version for the MS200? And why stop there, and try to perhaps reduce more bulk elsewhere in the design without compromising integral stability of course? Or maybe I'm barking up the wrong tree and stability is what has dictated the design thus far?
Nonetheless, Just a thought for further development :))
All the best.
 
Hi Fred,
I'm very glad to see the reorganisation of your MS140 offering.
One thing that springs to my mind is perhaps also a redevelopment at the MS200 towards a lighter version. For example, the MS200 turntable seems very bulky and heavy to me. Perhaps in the days when it was first designed, materials and structural integrity required the bulk, but given the lightness and the rigidity of the MS140 turntable is able to withstand a whopping 72lbs tensile pull, I'm wondering why not devise a version for the MS200? And why stop there, and try to perhaps reduce more bulk elsewhere in the design without compromising integral stability of course? Or maybe I'm barking up the wrong tree and stability is what has dictated the design thus far?
Nonetheless, Just a thought for further development :))
All the best.
Hello Casius_Juventus

We appreciate any thoughts that we get.

But I do not think that developing a lighter MS200 or ML100 is a good idea.

We learned from the MS140 project that stringers like to get a lot of weight for the price because that gives them a solid and firm feeling.

The nice thing about the MS140 is actually that it is a much more “high tech” design which uses the material much more effective than with the other machines with the very accurate MS200 drive system inside.

Maybe it helps that the prices went down so the price per kg went up.;)

But the other side of the matter is that we sold much more convential machines last year then the high MS140

So not many reasons for new developments.
 
Hello Casius_Juventus

We appreciate any thoughts that we get.

But I do not think that developing a lighter MS200 or ML100 is a good idea.

We learned from the MS140 project that stringers like to get a lot of weight for the price because that gives them a solid and firm feeling.

The nice thing about the MS140 is actually that it is a much more “high tech” design which uses the material much more effective than with the other machines with the very accurate MS200 drive system inside.

Maybe it helps that the prices went down so the price per kg went up.;)

But the other side of the matter is that we sold much more convential machines last year then the high MS140

So not many reasons for new developments.
Thanks Fred. Appreciate your thoughts.
I'm a great fan of the MS140 turntable. It's very efficient and stylish.
Finally regarding its reorganisation, have you finalised what the new pricing is going to be?
 
Any videos out there that show these new machine offerings in action and explain how they work would be appreciated......
One remark about our video:
We will only supply the MS140 with the 5 point standard Stringway racquet support as shown on the picture above.

This document describes how the MS140 system works.

http://www.stringway-nl.com/pdf/The simplicity of the MS140.pdf

Finally regarding its reorganisation, have you finalised what the new pricing is going to be?
The long initial discussion about the light weight machine was removed because I answered a question about the price. So the only thing that I can say is: Considerably lower than last year please look at our Euro-site or send me an email.
 
One remark about our video:
We will only supply the MS140 with the 5 point standard Stringway racquet support as shown on the picture above.

This document describes how the MS140 system works.

http://www.stringway-nl.com/pdf/The simplicity of the MS140.pdf



The long initial discussion about the light weight machine was removed because I answered a question about the price. So the only thing that I can say is: Considerably lower than last year please look at our Euro-site or send me an email.
Thanks Fred.
Will do.
 
Please do not hesitate to launch any ideas that you all have about improving our products.

We are open minded to any ideas that could improve our equipment.

Of course an idea has to meet a number of requirements to be useful for production and the price is a very important one.
My Gamma Progression ll dropweight machine has:

Etchings in lbs and kilos.

Costs $500 or so less.

Has fewer moving parts.....meaning, it is simple, not much can go wrong.

Reliable.

To me....has a better and faster mounting system. I prefer 2 pt. over 6pt any day.

Is lighter weight....more portability.

Did I also mention it has a bar with etchings for lbs and kilos.........and costs less, more simple.

Look, I have lusted after a Stringway machine for a very very long time. But you can't charge a steep price for something that is really so simple without putting etchings on the tension rod.

That's like designing a really great automobile and charging a steep price, but the problem is, it has no speedometer.......you have to download an app(ruler) telling you how fast you're going......Makes no sense this day in time to say you can't put etchings on a rod.

You say it would be expensive......okay, outsource it. If you don't like that, buy an engrave machine and make them in house. If you can etch the "S" Stringway logo into the machine, you can put etchings on a bar...


Like I said, I think you have a really great product.....I have the double and triple flying clamps and they are very well made and have good feel, but I can't justify a purchase of a simple dropweight machine that doesn't have engraved tension settings on the bar.

You designed a portable machine in the 140. You offered the 5 pt. and a 2pt. option. People complained that they didn't believe the 2pt. mount was secure so now Stringway says they will not make the 140 with the 2pt. mount anymore. Not going to get in the whole 2pt. vs. 5 or 6pt. To me it's all preference, and I prefer the 2pt any day and everyday.

Point is, if you're willing to give the consumer what they want by changing the mounting system of the machine, surely you can put those etchings on a bar. There are no excuses. Other companies do it.....

Find a way to do it! or lose customers to the competition that can give them what they want at a much cheaper price.

I respect Stringway, but this is such a solvable problem.
 

eagle

Hall of Fame
Hi kabrac. I actually asked the question about the etchings 2 years.

See Post 466

I love the tabletop stringer but since I've gotten the Neos 1000, I haven't used it. The Neos is just much easier to setup, use, and put away.

I will put it in the For Sale section soon.

Thanks.
 
Hi kabrac. I actually asked the question about the etchings 2 years.

See Post 466

I love the tabletop stringer but since I've gotten the Neos 1000, I haven't used it. The Neos is just much easier to setup, use, and put away.

I will put it in the For Sale section soon.

Thanks.
Why the need to overcomplicate things? Just the standard etched rod with both lbs and kgs, ala Gamma, would be fine.
 
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Hi kabrac. I actually asked the question about the etchings 2 years.

See Post 466

I love the tabletop stringer but since I've gotten the Neos 1000, I haven't used it. The Neos is just much easier to setup, use, and put away.

I will put it in the For Sale section soon.

Thanks.
I know. I should have mentioned you in my reply. I just wanted to hopefully let them know that is a very solvable problem with the tension rod. They can use all the excuses about it costing too much......blah blah whatever. Outsource or make them in house and don't pass on the cost to the customer. They are already charging a pretty penny for a dropweight machine. I definitely like them but i just can't justify the purchase.

I also have stung on and owned a Neos 1000. I agree, they are fantastic!! Love how quickly you can mount a racquet.

I sold it because I moved and just went with the 2pt Gamma Progression ll. And I love it's simplicity.

Thanks for chiming back in!
 
What the need to overcomplicate things? Just the standard etched rod with both lbs and kgs, ala Gamma, would be fine.
Q
Hi kabrac. I actually asked the question about the etchings 2 years.

See Post 466

I love the tabletop stringer but since I've gotten the Neos 1000, I haven't used it. The Neos is just much easier to setup, use, and put away.

I will put it in the For Sale section soon.

Thanks.
Which machine are you selling?
 
What the need to overcomplicate things? Just the standard etched rod with both lbs and kgs, ala Gamma, would be fine.
Exactly. I know the rod Stringway uses is longer than the Gamma dropweight rod, but Gamma, Klippermate, Alpha, hell, even Eagnas can put lbs and kilo etchings on a metal rod.....Why can't Stringway.

Their avatar on here reads, "Every Detail Counts". Well, I think they missed a pretty "important" detail if you ask me.

And I don't want to hear about costs, that it's too expensive. If Eagnas can do it, and their reputation speaks for itself, surely Stringway can step up to the plate and offer this on their machines. The ruler thing is a joke for what they charge for a basic dropweight machine.
 
Why the need to overcomplicate things? Just the standard etched rod with both lbs and kgs, ala Gamma, would be fine.
This discussion has been run and won.

Two reasons for the Ruler ...

1/ Etched markings on the metal rod can be scraped and fade away over time with use. Once the markings are worn out, the machine is useless. The ruler is unlikely to become useless. And in the unlikely event it is damaged or lost, it is easy to acquire a replacement.

2/ Using a Ruler permits the flexibility to use different "Weights" on the rod.

For sure, it probably saves some $$$ in the manufacture. And if those savings are passed on to the purchaser that is a good thing.
 
Hi guys,

Because of the very high customer satisfaction with the MS140 and the fact that we can lower the price considerably we decided to make a special MS140 for badminton.

This video shows how it works.

 
This discussion has been run and won.

Two reasons for the Ruler ...

1/ Etched markings on the metal rod can be scraped and fade away over time with use. Once the markings are worn out, the machine is useless. The ruler is unlikely to become useless. And in the unlikely event it is damaged or lost, it is easy to acquire a replacement.

2/ Using a Ruler permits the flexibility to use different "Weights" on the rod.

For sure, it probably saves some $$$ in the manufacture. And if those savings are passed on to the purchaser that is a good thing.
Can you explain how the etchings get worn down. You undue the screw knob and it slides perfectly. I've had mine 3 almost 4 years and it looks new.........

Easy to forget and lose a ruler......
 
May be an etched rod AND a ruler to satisfy everyone?

Wait ... then we could have discussions about the quality control of the ruler and etchings and why they are off by a micrometer.
 
The principle of the MS140 tensioner is very simple and exactly the same as that of the MS200, that we produce since 1992:

When the lever is lifted the spring is ”loaded with force” and the string is tensioned by this force after clamping the string in the tension head.

The constant pull action is very accurate, reliable and cheap compared to electronic cp machines.

This video shows how consistent the badminton machine pulls tension

 
Its like if a lockout and dropweight had a baby...... resembles a dropweight, but the tension mechanism is a spring......

Well done. The gene pool is complete.

It seems easier to put etchings on a bar bahaha
 
Its like if a lockout and dropweight had a baby...... resembles a dropweight, but the tension mechanism is a spring......

Well done. The gene pool is complete.
Our footoperated MS200, which we make since 1992 is the actual parent, many very old ones are still in full operation.

This is such an old machine of one of the club members



Does the 140 use the Concord System?
No the MS140 has 360 degree rotation so does not need the Concorde.

What is the overall weight difference between the 140 and 100?
The MS140 weighs 6,7 kg and the ML100-TH 17 kg.

The difference in weight is in the lever, weight and heavy turntable.
 
Can you explain how the etchings get worn down. You undue the screw knob and it slides perfectly. I've had mine 3 almost 4 years and it looks new.........

Easy to forget and lose a ruler......
3 or 4 years? Try 25 Years!

Try hundreds and hundreds of racquet jobs where you are regularly having to change the tension settings.

If you only change setting on a rare basis, then it doesn't matter either way.
 
3 or 4 years? Try 25 Years!

Try hundreds and hundreds of racquet jobs where you are regularly having to change the tension settings.

If you only change setting on a rare basis, then it doesn't matter either way.
Have you ever strung on a dropweight before?.........and 25 years, yeah, I'm sure my machine will still be around and usable. It doesn't sound like you've ever used one before.

The rod isn't made out of wood. The tension weight and knob aren't a sharp knife......

When you unscrew the knob that holds the weight on.....the weight slides perfectly over the rod...........I just don't think you've used a dropweight before.
 
My old Serrano machine, my 1st machine , used, purchased back in 1968, is an automatic drop weight,
The rod is rather large with 2 large weights placed on the rod with a peddle that you step on. Knurled knob screws down to hold weight into position.
I bet that machine was one of there 1st ones with the low serial number, and it looked like it strung a massive number racquets before I got it, and back then, I put it through the works stringing a good number over the years.
Will occasionally use it for a wooden racquet that I get every so often, but the etched rod, ( looks like grooved lines and grooved numbers) into the metal is still very much readable (machine still functions as well) .
It was most likely built in the early 1930's. I really can't see how the etch would wear off if done properly. Any way that old beast sees very little use now. Served it purpose back then, but just to say if markings are placed properly in a metal rod, it does hold up where it is readable longer than many peoples life span.
 
I'm talking about 25 years from now.

I would expect an item that was manufactured 20 or 30 years ago to go the distance. Not so much one that was manufactured in the last 5 year - in many instances the cheaper machines will probably fail in other areas long before the rod becomes an issue.

In any case, I have used manual DW machines, and don't really care much for them. I belong to the LO Brigade.

Although I would happily "accept" a Stringway Automatic CP from anyone willing to donate one. LOL.
 
Find a way to do it! or lose customers to the competition that can give them what they want at a much cheaper price.

I respect Stringway, but this is such a solvable problem.
I think that the Stringway machines have some features compared to other machines which are so attractive in use that the scale which is not engraved is a secondary matter.

Besides, we have good reasons for the ruler:

- Difficult to get 3 scales on the round lever and also in good view.

- Engraving the scales on the lever is very expensive,

Do remember that our products are produced in the Netherlands and not in China like most of the others.

- We would need 2 different levers in KG en in LBS
 
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